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Old 12-29-2006, 05:12 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
...I also split my bones to make it easier for stuff to flow out.
How do you do that?
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Old 12-29-2006, 05:27 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
How do you do that?
I'm not sure how GB does it, but all I do is break the backbone from the ribs and sort of pull the ribs apart a bit. Sort of crack them, but not really break them otherwise you find bits of bone in your soupbowl. BLECH!

I'm not sure if anyone addressed this, (likely they did so please forgive my repitition) but a tbsp of cider vinegar will help to leach all the good stuff from the bones into your soup. Don't overdo the vinegar though.
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Old 12-29-2006, 06:12 PM   #23
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I basically just take my cleaver and whack the bones with the spine of the cleaver, not the blade. I don't really split them from tip to bottom, but just break them open a bit.
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Old 12-30-2006, 08:22 AM   #24
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True stock should be simmered long and slow. As others have stated, add some vegetables - onion, carrot, celery. Add peppercorns. Maybe a little salt, how much depending on how much liquid but I wouldn't add too much. I tend to not add herbs because it might contrast with what you plan to use the stock for later, although parsley is a good neutral herb so I throw some in there

30 minutes is (IMHO) too short a time to simmer stock. I cover the carcass well with water (and I also throw in some reserved chicken wings, necks, etc., which I keep on hand in the freezer for making stock with). Bring it to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and let it go, lightly simmering, about 4 hours. Strain it into another deep pot or into freezer containers for later use. Discard the vegetables and bones; they've outlived their usefulness.

Now, important: Chill the stock in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Spoon the congealed layer of fat off the top. If you have made perfect chicken stock it will appear to be gellied! Not to worry, you've done it right! The stock will liquify upon reheating. It's perfect.

And yes, of course, you can use it in Gumbo. Who hasn't heard of Chicken & Sausage Gumbo? (raise your hands... heheh)

Fraidy
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Old 12-30-2006, 11:48 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FraidKnot
True stock should be simmered long and slow. As others have stated, ...

...Now, important: Chill the stock in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Spoon the congealed layer of fat off the top. If you have made perfect chicken stock it will appear to be gellied! Not to worry, you've done it right! The stock will liquify upon reheating. It's perfect.

And yes, of course, you can use it in Gumbo. Who hasn't heard of Chicken & Sausage Gumbo? (raise your hands... heheh)

Fraidy
Hmmmm. This all sounds familiar.

I am so guilty of repeating what someone else has already said. It's because I don't always read every post in the topic and so don't realize that what I'm saying has already been posted.

I'm glad that I'm not the only one who repeats ideas around here. And just so ya know, I'm certainly not slamming your post, FraidKnot. As a point of fact, you added some things that I should have said. Thanks.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 12-30-2006, 11:53 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FraidKnot
True stock should be simmered long and slow. As others have stated, add some vegetables - onion, carrot, celery. Add peppercorns. Maybe a little salt, how much depending on how much liquid but I wouldn't add too much. I tend to not add herbs because it might contrast with what you plan to use the stock for later, although parsley is a good neutral herb so I throw some in there

30 minutes is (IMHO) too short a time to simmer stock. I cover the carcass well with water (and I also throw in some reserved chicken wings, necks, etc., which I keep on hand in the freezer for making stock with). Bring it to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and let it go, lightly simmering, about 4 hours. Strain it into another deep pot or into freezer containers for later use. Discard the vegetables and bones; they've outlived their usefulness.

Now, important: Chill the stock in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Spoon the congealed layer of fat off the top. If you have made perfect chicken stock it will appear to be gellied! Not to worry, you've done it right! The stock will liquify upon reheating. It's perfect.

And yes, of course, you can use it in Gumbo. Who hasn't heard of Chicken & Sausage Gumbo? (raise your hands... heheh)

Fraidy
Ok, good, because mine did come out gellied. I simmered it about 2 or 21/2 hours and I did refrigerate it and scrape off the fat from the top. I used two cups of it in my gumbo and two cups of water and two beef bullion cubes - and I froze the rest of the stock in sandwich bags of one cup each.
The gumbo had turkey smoked sausage, shrimp and my leftover roasted chicken. I also tossed in a bit of chopped fresh spinach at the end because I had some. It was delicious and there was none leftover. (I kind of wanted there to be a little leftover so I could have some today, but it is gone.) I had a church potluck dinner at my house. Many people ate several helpings of the gumbo.
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Old 12-30-2006, 12:04 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by christianmomof3
Ok, good, because mine did come out gellied. I simmered it about 2 or 21/2 hours and I did refrigerate it and scrape off the fat from the top. I used two cups of it in my gumbo and two cups of water and two beef bullion cubes - and I froze the rest of the stock in sandwich bags of one cup each.
The gumbo had turkey smoked sausage, shrimp and my leftover roasted chicken. I also tossed in a bit of chopped fresh spinach at the end because I had some. It was delicious and there was none leftover. (I kind of wanted there to be a little leftover so I could have some today, but it is gone.) I had a church potluck dinner at my house. Many people ate several helpings of the gumbo.
I love hearing success stories like yours. It does my heart good. Congrats. You are now a cullinary star, at least with gumbo. Good job.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 12-30-2006, 12:52 PM   #28
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I made chicken and dumplings with part of the stock from my rotisserie chickens. I had bought two and we only used about half of each - 1 lemon pepper, the other mojo flavored. I only added a can of cream of chicken soup with herbs and some pepper and used frozen dumplings. They may have been the best we've ever had. The gravy was so rich even dh used some french bread to eat it up. I have enough to make another recipe, but will keep it in the freezer til we are finished with all the holiday stuff. I still have about a half of the ham and a bit of the rib roast to use up.
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Old 12-31-2006, 01:22 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sararwelch
My CIA Professional Chef book says 8lbs of chicken bones for 1 gallon of water, carrots onions and celery, salt and herbs. Simmer for 4 to 6 hours.
when i make my seafood + chicken + sausage gumbo, i debone all the chicken from 2 whole chickens and roast the bones & skin in the oven until very brown.

i add the roasted bones and skin to simmering water along with chopped onions, bell pepper, celery, garlic, and herbs to create a stock that would wake you up from a good sleep; it makes your WHOLE house smell wonderful.
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