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Old 06-05-2006, 12:34 AM   #1
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Making chicken stock

i did a search and didn't really find any help. i want to make my own chicken stock, but i don't really have a clue where to start. i have a frozen chicken carcass in the freezer from a lemon roasted chicken. i've also got onions, celery, carrots, garlic, potatoes, peppers, all sorts of stuff. do i need more chicken to make a decent amount? how much water should i put in? also, how to make beef or veggie broth, same basic principles? any tips are greatly appreciated

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Old 06-05-2006, 01:07 AM   #2
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Hi Kat,
just about ready to call it a night, but, will look for some ideas for you to post tomorrow or tuesday..I'll bet that one of our great people here will drop by before then and give you a hand..Wish I could do it now, but, it's been a long day
Before I go, I haven't seen you before so a big welcome to you.

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Old 06-05-2006, 01:13 AM   #3
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Basic concepts are bones(=gelatin/body), aromatics(=depth) and liquid(viscosity).

it sounds like you have all the basics for a heart warming broth. I would break up the carcass to release the goodness(marrow). Start with some moderate heat, add the bones and render all that you can, then add your aromatics, and caramalize. Once things have developed some color and such, deglaze the pot w/ a palatable white wine, cook out the alchahol, and add your liquid. A this point I would recomend a "boquet garnie", or a sachet of your selection of herbs, seeds and other "perfumey" aromatics(bay leaf, peppercorns,whole woody herbs:rosemary/thyme,and the like). Then it is a matter of simmering. My rule of thumb is to reduce by a third, chill, and see how the gelatin content is( jiggily), the fat content is(the congieled oil drops/layer), and clarity is. From this stage you should have a stock, of wich you can render soups, and such. For a consomme, add a raft while the base is chilled, and slowley raise to a meer simmer, skim/drain, thus rendering you a jewel clear jus.

Hope this makes some sense...remember, soup is good food. Broths are simply rendered/boiled/processed leftovers. it is all about utilizing the most of your product.
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Old 06-05-2006, 02:14 AM   #4
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Hi Kat,

Here's the first part of a complete e-course on making chicken stock that has proven valuable to me http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=25256
You'll have no problems finding the rest of the course. Good luck!
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Old 06-05-2006, 10:04 AM   #5
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I've been making chicken stock for years. It's a staple in my kitchen. I tend to use a store-bought, cold, roasted chicken for my soups, and I save the scraps for stock. If I actually roast a chicken (or two these days), I'll save those scraps as well. I like using these, as they're already caramelized.

If I'm using raw poultry, I start with cold water (to coagulate the blood proteins), skim the foamy junk off the top, and when it finally comes to a boil, add the aromatic veggies, cover, and reduce to a simmer/poach. Don't "boil" the stock, as it will be cloudy.

If all of the scraps I'm using are cooked, I'll start with hot water, then bring it to a boil.

I only use onions and celery for aromatics in my chicken stock. I'm not fond of the taste of carrots with chicken (I don't put carrots in my chicken soup, either). If I have some leeks, I'll use those as well. Garlic cloves, whole, and some whole peppercorns can also be used, but I prefer to leave my stock more on the unseasoned side, as I'll season it when I use it.

I usually simmer/poach my stock for about 12 hours, to render all the cartiliage into gelatine.

I strain my stock at this point, then, in a different pan, bring it up to a boil and reduce it by about half. I do this to concentrate the stock, and make it easier to store. I usually make about 1 1/2 - 2 GALLONS of stock at a time, so storage space is at a premium.

Once my stock is reduced, I'll chill it in an ice bath in my sink. I go so far as to even place a 2-L pop bottle filled with water, then frozen, into the pan to help chill the stock. I can take 2 gallons of stock from a boil to 40 degrees F in about 30 minutes.

Once my stock is chilled, I start pouring the stock into ice cube trays and freezing it. If I have a lot, this may take a few batches of freezing to do, so I keep the stock in the refrigerator when done. Once the stock is frozen, I pop the cubes out and into a gallon ziplock bag, and store that.
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Old 06-05-2006, 10:05 AM   #6
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Obviously you can find procedures on the web... but here is what I do, and it works well.
Take that single chicken carcas. Break it up enough to fit in your pot. Cover with water and then a little more. Put in some garlic, carrots, celery, salt pepper... leave off the potato. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer- let it cook for couple of hours...strain out the bits, reserve the liquid. Cool in frige. Scrape off the fat that will get solid on the top. Freeze in containers in sizes that are useful to your cooking....
This is simple, easy and makes GREAT flavor.
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Old 06-05-2006, 10:31 AM   #7
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I think everybody else has just about covered it, but I just wanted to say it is very very easy and rewarding to make chicken stock. I use either leftover carcasses as you intend, or chicken wings, which are so cheap and make a superb stock or broth. I think the definate three other ingrdients are carrot, celery and onion. I also throw in some peppercorns (whole or crushed) but i don't salt....I add it to my finished soups or dishes as I really hate over salty food. Sometimes in summer or if I am making a chicken and tarragon soup I chuck in half a lemon too, it makes for a lighter soup but if you chuck in the lemon it can be slightly sour, whih I like but is not to everyones taste. If I am feeling decadent I put in a tiny pinch of saffron, just because I love the colour, which is a silly reason. I also get a bizarre trill out of cooking with something that started as a bunch of bones and ends as a set jelly in my fridge. I know that is peculiar, but its the truth! LOL

As I said, its very easy and very rewarding as home made stock really does taste good, and fills the kitchen with a home smell and makes you feel like a worthy cook.
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Old 06-05-2006, 11:26 AM   #8
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We make stock regularly.

Would take the carcass, rub a bit of tomato paste on the bones, and roast it.

While it is roasting would also add coarsely cut up celery, onions, and carrots (we like them, AllenMI does not, your stock, your choice).

When they are browned would put them in a large pot with cold water and let come to a simmer.

Let go for a few hours and add some spices. Thyme is my favorite and add it at the beginning and then again at the end.

Have made stock many ways, using uncooked chicked and the cooked kind.

When we use the raw chix will boil them briefly and toss out the water, and then simmer with the veggies.

There are many ways to do the job, and all are very good.

We usually go with the roasted carcass and the tomato paste, it gives the final product a color we like.

But one can get a clearer stock, and a different flavor, with a raw bird.

Have some fun and try a few ways of doing it.

That, at least to us, is what cooking is all about.
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Old 06-05-2006, 11:50 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kat
i did a search and didn't really find any help. i want to make my own chicken stock, but i don't really have a clue where to start. i have a frozen chicken carcass in the freezer from a lemon roasted chicken. i've also got onions, celery, carrots, garlic, potatoes, peppers, all sorts of stuff. do i need more chicken to make a decent amount? how much water should i put in? also, how to make beef or veggie broth, same basic principles? any tips are greatly appreciated
Hi Again Kat,
I knew our DC family would come to the rescue Since they have covered what you wanted to know, I'll not add my ramblings to this..You've gotten some wonderful ideas and I imagine will have a great tasting stock to use in your recipes.This is what is so great about DC, just ask and many will try to help.

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Old 06-05-2006, 12:16 PM   #10
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Yes, making chicken stock is a piece of cake.

I do it all the time, and some of my cooking jobs have required me to do it in past employment. Also, beef stock is easy as well, once the bones are browned in the oven.

Once you have the stock, the possiblilyies with it are endless!


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