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Old 03-03-2016, 09:35 PM   #11
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Location: Logan County, Colorado
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The saying for men is "The only difference between men and boys is the cost of their toys!" My wife can attest to the truth of that statement.

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Old 03-04-2016, 10:41 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
Lol, Chief! Yes, I have tons of power and hand tools (and know how to use 'em), along with jewelry-making and gardening stuff. I think the only thing I might be lacking is a Kitchen Aid mixer. No need, since I rarely bake.

I drove to school on a snowmobile, living in the Great White North. I found it amusing when we had the whole fam damly when we were in your lovely state of Michigan that I was the only one to keep folks upright on the waverunner. It's very similar to driving a snowmobile. Everyone else who tried driving them managed to dump themselves and their passengers, and the water was icy cold!
Learning to drive snowmobiles helped turn me into an above average driver more than any other machine. With my old Polaris, and it's track-wide cleats, if you got it on ice, or hardpack road snow, and went a little sideways, you could spin it endlessly, seemingly out of control. You had to use to counter-steer around corners (what the auto crowd calls drifting) to keep the sled going around properly. Body English was essential if you wanted to go the speeds I used to go, and not roll the machine. The same skills are used when being towed by a hot sled, and you are riding an aluminum flying saucer at 70+ mph. When done successfully, it was a fast and thrilling ride. Done wrong, you could end up in the hospital, or cemetery. And yet, I'm still alive, I think. Any way you look at it, by the time I got in a car (truck) to learn to drive, I had skid control, reflexes, and decision making processes firmly in place. Using that same metality, when it was time for my own kids to learn to drive, I knew that the school driver's ed program couldn't teach them all the skills they would need. So I took them out into icy supermarket parking lots, at 2 a.m., and taught them how to control skids, throw the tranny into neutral when coming to a stop, how to rock the car to get it unstuck, etc. Life's lessons are to be handed down from parent to child. That's how it's supposed to work.

I know longer own all the toys, but I have had them all at one time or another. Dirt bikes, road bikes, road bicycles, bows and arrows, fire arms, boats, canoes, and the list goes on. My best toys were my kids. Ever turn a 4 year old on his/her side, on your lap, and pretend they are a guitar, strumming on their bellies. It's a hoot. They wiggle, squirm, laugh, and just go crazy. So many games to play with them. Yep, my best toys have always been my kids, and now, my grandkids.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
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Old 03-12-2016, 07:37 PM   #13
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Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: New Brunswick
Posts: 17
We love chicken here :) A few simple recipes we like are-

Russian Chicken

I use 8-9 boneless/skinless chicken thighs (sometimes breasts *5-6*)
1 cup russian dressing
1 cup apricot jam
1 package onion soup mix.

Put chicken in baking dish and mix dressing, jam and soup mix together. Pour over chicken and cook @ 350 for around 45-55 minutes (or until cooked through). We serve it over rice and it's delicious!

I sometimes use 1.5 cups of dressing and jam and add more than a package of onion soup mix to make more sauce to fully cover chicken, depending on how much I want to make.
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Old 03-12-2016, 07:40 PM   #14
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Tex Mex Chicken (slow cooker)

3-4 chicken breasts cut into strips
1 large jar of salsa (or around 1.5 cups)
1 green and 1 red pepper (cut into thin strips)
1 cup of frozen corn
2 tbsp taco seasoning
2 tbsp flour

Mix taco seasoning and flour together and coat chicken, then put in slow cooker. Add in salsa, corn and peppers. Give a little stir and cook on low for 6-8 hours or on high for 4-6 hours. Once cooked we serve over rice and top of tex-mex shredded cheese.

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Old 03-12-2016, 07:43 PM   #15
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Chicken and stuffing casserole

3-4 chicken breasts (I pre-cook them in the oven and slice them up into chunks)
cream of chicken soup
cream of celery soup
frozen veggies of your choice (around 2 cups)
Stove top stuffing mix (2 boxes)

As I mentioned above, I pre-cook the chicken breasts and have them chunked up and toss in the bottom of my baking dish. I top with frozen veggies, then the soups and lastly I cook the stuffing then spoon over the top of the soup (as I like a firmer stuffing) and bake for around 30 minutes @ 350. Sometimes I add in some grated cheese too.
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Old 03-12-2016, 07:45 PM   #16
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Salsa chicken is good too and can be served with rice, salad, potatoes, whatever you fancy. Just bake chicken breasts with bit of salt, pepper, oregano and salsa on top (I cover with foil for a while) and you can finish it off with some grated cheese.

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