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Old 08-25-2006, 08:58 AM   #11
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I hope you are not putting the meat in that warm water Sephora. That can be very dangerous. If you need to use warm water to disolve the salt then make sure to cool the water down below 40 degrees before you put the meat in.
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Old 08-25-2006, 09:45 AM   #12
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You don't need egg at all for fried chicken. If you marinate it in buttermilk, then jut pat it dry and dredge it in well seasoned flour and fry. For extra crispy, dip the dredged chicken in buttermilk and back to the flour a second time then fry.
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Old 08-25-2006, 11:14 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
I hope you are not putting the meat in that warm water Sephora. That can be very dangerous. If you need to use warm water to disolve the salt then make sure to cool the water down below 40 degrees before you put the meat in.
I've always (all of three times) used warm water and a frozen turkey. That's just how my SIL taught me to do it. I guess the temp of the frozen turkey immediately drops the water temp because it's usually cold.
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Old 08-25-2006, 11:42 AM   #14
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As long as the temp drops down below 40 degrees then you are ok, but if it doesn't then you are playing with fire. Just be careful. I would hate to see you get sick!
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Old 08-25-2006, 01:39 PM   #15
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How do I know the water is cold enough? I know that my water out of my tap is definitely not that cold except maybe in the dead of winter during an ice storm. Do you normally ad a bag of ice. Personally I have a cast iron stomach, it takes a lot for me to get sick, my mom was the queen of the last day to buy discount meat, but I would hate for my guests to get sick. I actually already know it's my year to do Thanksgiving so I would like to try this on a chicken this weekend.

Another question. Can you brine a chicken that you are going to use to make beer can chicken?
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Old 08-25-2006, 02:02 PM   #16
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To insure 40F temps for brining a turkey or chicken, you make the brine, cool it and put the bird and the brine in the fridge.

When I make a gallon of brine, I start with a half gallon of water and add all the salt and sugar, all the seasonings and bring it to a boil to dissolve the salt and sugar and to extract some flavor from the herbs and spices.

Then I add a half gallon of ice cubes and stir to dissolve the ice and mix the whole mess. The temp is good and it can all go into the fridge. A half gallon if ice cubes weighs about 4.2 pounds.

You can and should brine a beer can chicken.
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Old 08-25-2006, 02:15 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sephora
How do I know the water is cold enough?
Yet another use for a kitchen thermometer that goes from 0 to 500.

Brine in the fridge. If your turkey for Tgiving is too large, brine it in a cooler lined with a plastic bag in the basement or outside. Also, you can put blue ice packs sealed in ziplock bags into the brine to make sure it stays below 40.
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Old 08-25-2006, 02:23 PM   #18
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This is a good thred, lots of stuff I didnt know thanks
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Old 08-25-2006, 03:16 PM   #19
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We do the turkey in a round cooler in the shed when we do it in November at least here. My fridge wouldn't even hold a chicken it's so small and over filled. We've always brined and defrosted at the same time so chilling wasn't ever an issue I guess. I'm definitely learning things here.
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Old 08-25-2006, 04:24 PM   #20
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If you love your method, why change it?

Personally, I always soak chicken overnight in a buttermilk bath with assorted seasonings. I believe it makes the flesh softer. Conversely, I always soak my thanksgiving turkey in apple cider, kosher salt and other seasonings 2 days before thanksgiving, too.
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