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Old 08-25-2006, 06:27 AM   #1
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Wink Purpose of putting chicken in a brine ?

So many recipes for frying chicken, say to put it in a brine ,I have never done this - alot of ppl soak in buttermilk (which I never buy) and do not care for egg wash on chicken. Could you use just the egg white ?Love my fried chicken !!!

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Old 08-25-2006, 06:35 AM   #2
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Brining meats (for at least 8 hours) before cooking them in whatever way makes them unbelievably moist. It makes the meat more forgiving too in case you overcook them. I do this for chicken breasts and pork chops. They always turn out so good :-)
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Old 08-25-2006, 06:43 AM   #3
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Wink

What do you brine in ? Thanks for the info.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopstix
Brining meats (for at least 8 hours) before cooking them in whatever way makes them unbelievably moist. It makes the meat more forgiving too in case you overcook them. I do this for chicken breasts and pork chops. They always turn out so good :-)
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Old 08-25-2006, 07:47 AM   #4
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Just for clarification you can brine poultry, pork and shrimp--NOT beef (as in "steak" referenced above). Brining red meat is not done--for tenderness as we are talking about here.
I dislike brining poultry and I know I am in the huge minority, but I think it makes the meat mushy. And I will put my moist unbrined thanksgiving turkey up against ANY!!
As for brining chicken for frying, I prefer to marinate in buttermilk for a couple of hours (no longer--again, mushy) and then batter and fry.
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Old 08-25-2006, 07:53 AM   #5
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Soaking in buttermilk is not the same as brining. To be a brine it needs to be water and salt at the minimum. Well actually you don't even need the water, and liquid would do, but salt is essential. The salt water (or liquid) is soaked into the meat thus making it juicier and more flavorful.

I agree with Gretchen that brining can make meat mushy, but only if you brine for too long. I find 2 hours plenty for my boneless skinless chicken breasts. I am a huge fan of brining. I think it greatly improves the taste, texture, and juiciness of certain meats.

Do a search here on Brining and you will find a ton more info.
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Old 08-25-2006, 08:09 AM   #6
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This is very interesting. I have used butter milk, I most often leave chicken breast in natural yogurt to soften, and then heavily spice rub then to grill. I also often leave them in cheap sherry.
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Old 08-25-2006, 08:25 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lulu
This is very interesting. I have used butter milk, I most often leave chicken breast in natural yogurt to soften, and then heavily spice rub then to grill. I also often leave them in cheap sherry.
Most of those would generally be considered marinades, not brines.
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Old 08-25-2006, 08:27 AM   #8
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Yes, I can see that. Its just that it is the experience closest to brining I have and I am trying, in my slow way, to relate to a new method! I am presuming than brining leaves no taste but a succelent meat, by way of osmosis?
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Old 08-25-2006, 08:37 AM   #9
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Osmosis is exactly right. It does leave a taste though since you are using salt. Also you can add other ingredients to further flavor the meat. Herbs are a great thing to add. Also things like sugar, peppercorns, seasonings, soy sauce, and things like that will contribute to adding flavor.
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Old 08-25-2006, 08:45 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barb L
What do you brine in ? Thanks for the info.
I brine in course salt, warm water to start with because it will delute the salt, and chicken stalk. It's my SIL's recipe and it's worked for me with turkey. Haven't done a chicken yet as cooking a whole chicken is somewhat of a waste with just two people at our house.
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