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Old 11-20-2008, 01:17 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by *amy* View Post
IIf you want a poultry taste, you can use poultry seasoning - depends on the recipe. .
Poultry seasoning doesn't make the stuffing taste like poultry though. I make my stuffing with unsalted turkey broth, which gives it a great turkey flavor.
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Old 11-20-2008, 05:17 PM   #22
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one more cook for the soup


Looks like there is a million ideas on this so I will add my turkey to the conversation. I do the brining, using an ice chest left outside in the shed overnight. Then I stuff the bird, old family recipe that is cooked before stuffing. Then I fire up my Weber and cook it indirectly. I have found that covering the turkey with cheesecloth and keeping that moist with a white wine/butter concoction helps to keep the skin from turning black and the breast moist. For the last 40 minutes or so take the cheesecloth off and let the skin brown. YUMMY, my wife won''t even let me cook one in the oven anymore.
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Old 11-20-2008, 08:51 PM   #23
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I have to disagree with this. I've been stuffing my turkeys for many, many years and my mother and grandmother before me and my turkey does not dry out. The breast meat is always juicy. I make up my stuffing the night before and don't stuff it until right before I put it in the oven. There is nothing in my stuffing to deem it unsafe. Putting the stuffing in the turkey does give it a better flavor than just putting it in a casserole. I always have some leftover that I just bake and it does lack the turkey flavor. My turkeys are usually 20 to 24 pounders.

Barb
ok, i'll sacrifice the aded turkey flavor (which i will get from the TURKEY and lessen my chances of sending my consumers to the JOHN for the next 48 hours,

finesse is nothing more than science not understood.
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Old 11-21-2008, 12:23 AM   #24
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ok, i'll sacrifice the aded turkey flavor (which i will get from the TURKEY and lessen my chances of sending my consumers to the JOHN for the next 48 hours,

finesse is nothing more than science not understood.
To each his own.....I've never sent anyone to the JOHN after my turkey dinners and I've been doing it well over 20 years! Do what you want.

Barb
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Old 11-21-2008, 08:20 AM   #25
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To each his own.....I've never sent anyone to the JOHN after my turkey dinners and I've been doing it well over 20 years! Do what you want.

Barb
Not to belabor the point, but how do you know? Do your guests tell you when they go to the John? They could be affected up to 72 hours after eating. Are they telling you 3 days later what their bathroom habits are?

I am not trying to be a jerk. I am just trying to point out that we do not always know if our cooking habits are negatively affecting people. The only way to really know if someone got food poisoning is for a doctor to do a blood test. Short of that, we are all just guessing.

Edited to add: I am not saying you have ever made anyone sick. It is very possible and even very probable that you have not. I am just saying that none of us can really know that for sure without a blood test.
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Old 11-21-2008, 08:56 AM   #26
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Although I haven't seen this subject discussed, but I HATE the practice of injecting a salt solution into meats and poultry. It changes the whole character of the meat and takes away my control of how much salt there is in the drippings. I much prefer to have the meat flavor in its natural state. I find this in pork roasts and turkey and in store roasted rotisserie chickens. I have not tried brining and probably won't. My turkeys, stuffed and unstuffed have all turned out moist and flavorful. AND the drippings make wonderful gravy, which is food of the gods!
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Old 11-21-2008, 09:21 AM   #27
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I haven't cooked anything but a fresh bird for years. Recently got into the free range thing and won't go back to caged critters...the taste is quite different.

Brining is great, but so is dry seasoning the day before. Injecting should also work fine. An herb butter or broth would be nice.

Your stuffing creation is your imagination and your likes. Some like fruit like apples in their stuffing. Sausage is great. I add leftover wild rice and chopped pecans, and also do an oyster one for those of us who like it.

I always stuffed the bird until last year. My stuffing was fine baked in a caserole, and my bird was awesome (cavity filled with onion garlic celerey etc).. you can cook the turkey a little less when unstuffed (it comes to safe temp more quickly and you don't have to wait for the middle of the stuffing to get there.)

Anyway...sounds like you got good ideas there so enjoy the day and the feast!
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Old 11-21-2008, 09:44 AM   #28
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Although I haven't seen this subject discussed, but I HATE the practice of injecting a salt solution into meats and poultry. It changes the whole character of the meat and takes away my control of how much salt there is in the drippings. I much prefer to have the meat flavor in its natural state. I find this in pork roasts and turkey and in store roasted rotisserie chickens. I have not tried brining and probably won't. My turkeys, stuffed and unstuffed have all turned out moist and flavorful. AND the drippings make wonderful gravy, which is food of the gods!
I don't like it either. But if you check the labels, you can choose meats that haven't had sodium added.

I always brine my Thanksgiving turkeys. Brined turkeys give you great gravy, too.
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Old 11-21-2008, 10:21 AM   #29
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I am extremely concerned about food safety as well but this thread seems to be getting a bit heated for my taste. I have even had food poisoning after eating over at someone's house so you don't have to tell me about proper prepping and cooking techniques. However, even Alton Brown has changed his mind about stuffing a bird. Stuffing is no longer evil.

And by the way, what is called "brining" is nothing more than what is done during the koshering process unless you are adding aromatics and other flavorings. In fact, Shirley O'Corriher explains the science of osmosis.

However you choose to make you Thanksgiving turkey, let's not forget what the holiday is truly about. May you have more blessings than you can count and close friends and family to share the day with.
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Old 11-21-2008, 11:34 AM   #30
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I am extremely concerned about food safety as well but this thread seems to be getting a bit heated for my taste. I have even had food poisoning after eating over at someone's house so you don't have to tell me about proper prepping and cooking techniques. However, even Alton Brown has changed his mind about stuffing a bird. Stuffing is no longer evil.

And by the way, what is called "brining" is nothing more than what is done during the koshering process unless you are adding aromatics and other flavorings. In fact, Shirley O'Corriher explains the science of osmosis.

However you choose to make you Thanksgiving turkey, let's not forget what the holiday is truly about. May you have more blessings than you can count and close friends and family to share the day with.

Stuffing a turkey is perfectly safe as long as you cook the stuffing to a temp of 165. If the stuffing doesn't reach that temperature, it's a potential source of food poisoning.

Depending on how you stuff the turkey and what you stuff it with, it sometimes takes longer to get the stuffing to 165 than it takes to fully cook the breast meat. This can result in an overcooked bird. What many people do is take the turkey out when its done, remove the stuffing and put it back in the oven to fully cook.

Brining a turkey is a different than koshering, as the bird stays in the brine for a lot longer than it does in the koshering process.

Corriher, McGee and other food scientists who have studied brining suggest that it involves a process much more complex than osmosis. The process draws in moisture, holds it in the cells and relaxes the protein strands.

IMO it's a great way to ensure a juicy, flavorful bird.
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