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Old 02-01-2018, 04:18 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
tenspeed... not sure I understand that statement. Could you explain please?
I think that it's just as stated. Cast iron takes more time to get up to temp, and then holds that temp. It takes a while to cool back down from searing heat to gentle cooking. A cast iron pan will retain it's heat for a while after you turn down the burner, so timing is important. Cast iron can often cook more evenly than a more conductive pan.

A clad frying pan cools more quickly as you change the temperature of the burner. This can actually lead to less even cooking, depending on the quality of the pan and of the heat source. The typical electric range element cycles on and off to achieve a "constant" temperature. That effect will be more noticeable with aluminum or clad than with cast iron.
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Old 02-01-2018, 04:59 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I think that it's just as stated. Cast iron takes more time to get up to temp, and then holds that temp. It takes a while to cool back down from searing heat to gentle cooking. A cast iron pan will retain it's heat for a while after you turn down the burner, so timing is important. Cast iron can often cook more evenly than a more conductive pan.

A clad frying pan cools more quickly as you change the temperature of the burner. This can actually lead to less even cooking, depending on the quality of the pan and of the heat source. The typical electric range element cycles on and off to achieve a "constant" temperature. That effect will be more noticeable with aluminum or clad than with cast iron.
jennyema suggested roasting in cast iron in the oven, though. If you preheat the pan with the oven and then put the chicken in, it will roast beautifully. Since the heat is coming from all around rather than just from underneath, like on the stovetop, it will be pretty even.

I would start it skin-side down, to get a good sear going, then turn them over and cook till the breasts reach 155F. Remove to a plate, cover with foil and let rest 10 minutes to allow them to cook through. Yummy, juicy tender meat
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Old 02-01-2018, 06:21 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I think that it's just as stated. Cast iron takes more time to get up to temp, and then holds that temp. It takes a while to cool back down from searing heat to gentle cooking. A cast iron pan will retain it's heat for a while after you turn down the burner, so timing is important. Cast iron can often cook more evenly than a more conductive pan.

A clad frying pan cools more quickly as you change the temperature of the burner. This can actually lead to less even cooking, depending on the quality of the pan and of the heat source. The typical electric range element cycles on and off to achieve a "constant" temperature. That effect will be more noticeable with aluminum or clad than with cast iron.
If you are roasting in an oven, it seems to me that the temperature stability of CI makes it a perfect vessel.

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Old 02-02-2018, 05:26 AM   #14
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tenspeed... not sure I understand that statement. Could you explain please?
Thermal conductivity of aluminum is about 3 - 4 times that of cast iron, and copper is about twice that of aluminum.

https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/t...als-d_858.html

One of the benefits of a heavy CI pan is its high thermal mass, meaning that it absorbs and stores a lot of heat energy. It's also relatively cheap. However, it does not conduct heat across the pan very well, at least not as well as aluminum or copper. A heavy CI pan is slow to respond to changes in the heat source.

Interesting fact - Diamond is one of the best thermal conductors, about five times that of copper. Cubic zirconia is a thermal insulator. The company that originally developed cubic zirconia for gemstone use (Ceres Corp.)also sold instruments to differentiate zirconia from diamond due to the difference in thermal conductivity, as the gemstone dealers couldn't tell the difference.
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Old 02-02-2018, 11:23 AM   #15
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I only roast chicken in a cast iron skillet. Parts or whole. I've tried various methods but the CI is the best performer, IMO. Been doing it for 30 years now.

Like others say, it holds heat and heats evenly. Its sides aren't too high. And its super simple to make a tasty pan sauce afterward.
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Old 02-02-2018, 11:34 AM   #16
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This discussion reminded me of the old chicken under a brick recipe. If you don't have a brick use a second CI pan.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/241500/...under-a-brick/
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