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Old 01-31-2018, 11:27 PM   #1
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Roast split bone-in chicken breasts

Smithís (Krogerís) had a sale on bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts (where do they get these gigantic chickens, anyway?). Iíve got plenty of ways to prepare them. But I seem to recall, sometime in my wicked youth, a recipe where two split chicken breasts are tied together tip to top, wit the cavity stuffed with aromatics and compound butter rubbed under the skin. It sounds like a thing, but I canít figure out how to position it in the pan!

Have any of you ever heard of this method? If yes, could you shed some light? And if this technique is a product of my fevered dreams, please donít hesitate to say it!

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Old 02-01-2018, 02:38 AM   #2
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No replies?

I gotta' say, I've never heard of that style of cooking chicken breasts that you described. If you are going to roast them, I'd set them up so that the skins are both exposed to the dry heat, so they brown up nicely. That should also keep the lean meat moist.

That's all I got.

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Old 02-01-2018, 05:49 AM   #3
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I found this:

stuffed baked split

the 'stuffed' part is a pocket cut in the breast.

but they are not tied together
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Old 02-01-2018, 06:44 AM   #4
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Guess I was dreaming!

I was researching all night, and canít find anything that resembles two chicken breasts trussed together then roasted. It certainly sounds interesting, but I think Iíll just go with traditional roast breast for two of them, and oven fry the other two. Still, if someone runs across something, Iíd love to hear about it!
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Old 02-01-2018, 07:30 AM   #5
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I have never heard of that method but I think that you would get the same results if you put the compound butter under the skin and put the breasts bone side down on a bed of aromatics in the roasting pan.
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Old 02-01-2018, 10:35 AM   #6
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It doesnt make a lot of sense to me to truss them.

I would brine them and roast in a cast iron skillet with butter under the skin.
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Old 02-01-2018, 11:53 AM   #7
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Like Jenny said, without a doubt I would brine them first! I often roast thighs on top of a bed of doctored up cornbread stuffing mix. You sure could do that with the breasts.
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Old 02-01-2018, 12:09 PM   #8
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According to Kenji, you are further ahead with a rack over a rimmed baking sheet than you are with a roasting pan with higher sides. Not sure what the benefits of a CI skillet are, especially in view of the fact that CI is a lousy heat conductor. My best roast chicken to date was a spatchcocked chicken on a cooling rack over a baking sheet.

Why You Don't Need an Expensive Roasting Pan | Serious Eats

I've cooked bone-in split breasts in a pressure cooker and they came out quite moist. Doesn't have the visual appeal of the browned skin you get from roasting, though.
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Old 02-01-2018, 12:21 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post

the fact that CI is a lousy heat conductor. .
tenspeed... not sure I understand that statement. Could you explain please?
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Old 02-01-2018, 03:06 PM   #10
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Sounds like you're trying to recreate a crown, but the keel bone is not there to hold the 2 breast together.

I'd treat them like basically any roast bird, just don't overcook as they will dry out fast.
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