"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-13-2010, 10:27 AM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Norway
Posts: 123
Roasted chicken

I love roasted whole chicken!

I but a special type here in norway that have a very good taste. They are between 3,5-4,5lbs each.

I normally roast it for about 30 minutes per kg (I think that will be about 25min per lbs). To check when its done I dry to twist the drumstick and if it twist easy its done. I have also tries putting a knife in the thigh but then all the juice runs out..

Yesterday I bought a thermometer but I wonder where should I put it? In the breast or the thigh? In the "drumstick" on the leg?

Sometimes the chicken breast gets very dry. So I guess its overcooked but when the breast is "ready" then the thigh is not twisting (and the liquid is pink). Anyone have a tip?

When I but small chicken 2-3,5 pound I don't have the problem with dry breast, its only when its above 3,5 lbs..

Would it help to brine it?

__________________

__________________
Girl from Norway thats love to cook.
I have IBS/IBD and is following SCD diet
www.scdandme.com
kamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 10:31 AM   #2
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Yes, brining would absolutely help. I am a huge fan of brining.

What kind of thermometer did you get? Is it a probe that you put in and leave in while the bird cooks or is it one that you take the temp when you check the bird? For the later, you would want to take readings in multiple spots.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 11:02 AM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Norway
Posts: 123
Itd a weber so it can be in the oven.

how to you brine?
is it possible to brine without sugar? I can't have sugar.
__________________
Girl from Norway thats love to cook.
I have IBS/IBD and is following SCD diet
www.scdandme.com
kamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 11:08 AM   #4
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Yes you can brine without sugar. I actually prefer it that way myself.

I do it to taste. I mix up a batch of saltwater that tastes "pleasantly salty" meaning when I taste it I do not have to spit it out right away. Submerge the bird in the water completely and put in the fridge. Let it brine for about 4-5 hours or so for a whole chicken. For just breasts I go 2 hours. Then take it out of the brine and rinse off if you like and then dry and use however you like.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 11:17 AM   #5
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Originally Posted by kamp View Post
I love roasted whole chicken!

I but a special type here in norway that have a very good taste. They are between 3,5-4,5lbs each.

I normally roast it for about 30 minutes per kg (I think that will be about 25min per lbs). To check when its done I dry to twist the drumstick and if it twist easy its done. I have also tries putting a knife in the thigh but then all the juice runs out..

Yesterday I bought a thermometer but I wonder where should I put it? In the breast or the thigh? In the "drumstick" on the leg?

Sometimes the chicken breast gets very dry. So I guess its overcooked but when the breast is "ready" then the thigh is not twisting (and the liquid is pink). Anyone have a tip?

When I but small chicken 2-3,5 pound I don't have the problem with dry breast, its only when its above 3,5 lbs..

Would it help to brine it?
Where to put the thermometer? In the same place you were putting the knife. You need the thickest part of the meat, and that is the junction between thigh and drumstick.

I find it really easy to keep the breast moist without brining (don't want the extra salt) by roasting for the first half of the time on the bird's stomach (tail in the air). I also often put a lemon, poked 20 times, inside the chicken. That adds both moisture and flavor.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 03:35 PM   #6
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
I've never had a perfect whole roasted chicken or turkey. After going through dozens of birds with various recipes, and ordering Poulet Roti all around the country in corner-shacks to shirt and tie establishments, I've concluded that no one else can make one either! (At least not to my taste anyways).

My solution is to break down the chicken into three pieces... two leg "quarters" and a "hotel" style breast. Everything gets rubbed with a bit of butter, sprinkled with kosher salt, and roasted in a 400F oven. Start the legs early, and they will be done when the collagen and connective tissues have broken down into luscious finger-coating gelatin. The breast will be done when the thickest part reaches 160-165F. Around 170F the breast begins to dry out.

I've had good birds cooked this way anywhere from 350F-425F - although I find that the best ratio of browned skin and evenly cooked meat occurs (in my oven) around 400F.
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 04:40 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher View Post
I've never had a perfect whole roasted chicken or turkey. After going through dozens of birds with various recipes, and ordering Poulet Roti all around the country in corner-shacks to shirt and tie establishments, I've concluded that no one else can make one either! (At least not to my taste anyways).

My solution is to break down the chicken into three pieces... two leg "quarters" and a "hotel" style breast. Everything gets rubbed with a bit of butter, sprinkled with kosher salt, and roasted in a 400F oven. Start the legs early, and they will be done when the collagen and connective tissues have broken down into luscious finger-coating gelatin. The breast will be done when the thickest part reaches 160-165F. Around 170F the breast begins to dry out.

I've had good birds cooked this way anywhere from 350F-425F - although I find that the best ratio of browned skin and evenly cooked meat occurs (in my oven) around 400F.
Hi Nicholas.... Have you done this with a turkey? I've been cooking longer than you've been alive, and your method just never occurred to me before now. Thank you!! I've never tasted a perfectly cooked turkey before come to think of it. I will DEFINITELY give this a try. Throwing kisses......lol
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 05:03 PM   #8
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,381
I have also struggled to get whole roast chicken right. I get my best results by cutting into the joint between the thigh and the body and spreading the leg/thigh away from the body so that joint will cook before the breasts dry out. I usually brine when roasting chickens.

On the other hand, since I started using the Good Eats roast turkey recipe, I get great results every time.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 05:53 PM   #9
Assistant Cook
 
amanda143's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Posts: 6
<3 Alton Brown for introducing me to the brining method! My chicken never tastes salty and it's practically perfect every time. I also started elevating it on a little roast rack too because I was getting soggy and not so crispy chicken when I let it sit in its own juice.
__________________
amanda143 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 08:07 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
DaveSoMD's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,038
Good Eats ROCKS!
__________________

__________________
Quoth the chicken, "Fry some more."
AB - Good Eats: Fry Hard II
DaveSoMD is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.