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Old 01-09-2011, 05:21 AM   #1
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Safeway's young chicken legs...young?

I recently purchased Safeway Young Chicken legs at my local major chain supermarket. Bulk pack of 14 or so. They're really large. They don't cook up as well as smaller drumbsticks.
A lot more sinew/fat or whatever too.

They were out of the better company that sells legs in just 6 packs. That brand (Foster Farms) seems to not let the chickens grow to gargantuan size.

I'm just saying, the bulk pack looked more like young turkey legs, not young chicken drumbsticks. Didn't used to be like that.
A sign of the times? I think they're "beefing" them up, so to speak. The meat isn't as tender, doesn't cook as well. They're too big.

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Old 01-09-2011, 11:40 AM   #2
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When I researched raising chickens, there were some "meat breeds" that matured very quickly (6-8 weeks, if memory serves). Most of the chicken sold in supermarkets are raised on factory farms (not ideal conditions for raising chickens, IMO). The best poultry I've ever eaten was organic, free-range. Quite a difference re: taste, texture, and juiciness. And price.
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Old 01-09-2011, 12:04 PM   #3
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I got a great deal on boneless skinless chicken one time $1.39 per pound (wrapped in store, so I don't know the brand). Holy crap were those breasts big! One half breast was enough to feed the both of us for dinner and we usually eat a decent sized serving of protein. Trouble was, these breasts were not very tender and were quite bland (even more bland than regular chicken breast.).

I don't currently have a budget for organic or free range chicken, so I find that Tyson breasts tend to be a reasonable size with decent flavor.
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Old 01-09-2011, 12:09 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
I don't currently have a budget for organic or free range chicken, so I find that Tyson breasts tend to be a reasonable size with decent flavor.
Nor do I--hence why I was researching raising chickens...
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Old 01-09-2011, 12:13 PM   #5
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Nor do I--hence why I was researching raising chickens...
We raised chickens a few times to eat when I was young, I remember them being very tasty.

My HOA and neighbors would probably take issue with me raising chickens on my back deck
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Old 01-09-2011, 12:32 PM   #6
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Wink

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Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
We raised chickens a few times to eat when I was young, I remember them being very tasty.

My HOA and neighbors would probably take issue with me raising chickens on my back deck
Check your HOA rules and local bylaws...it may be that this possibility was not covered, so your neighbours and the HOA would have to "suck it up."
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Old 01-09-2011, 01:14 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
I got a great deal on boneless skinless chicken one time $1.39 per pound (wrapped in store, so I don't know the brand). Holy crap were those breasts big! One half breast was enough to feed the both of us for dinner and we usually eat a decent sized serving of protein. Trouble was, these breasts were not very tender and were quite bland (even more bland than regular chicken breast.).

I don't currently have a budget for organic or free range chicken, so I find that Tyson breasts tend to be a reasonable size with decent flavor.

Hmmm... we had an organic turkey for Thanksgiving last year. I was truly disappointed in it. First it was just scrawny and was tough and tastelss. All that after I used all my turkey tricks on it. Really disappointing.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:15 PM   #8
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Hmmm... we had an organic turkey for Thanksgiving last year. I was truly disappointed in it. First it was just scrawny and was tough and tastelss. All that after I used all my turkey tricks on it. Really disappointing.
Oh gosh, you must've bought it at the wrong farm.

A friend's husband ordered an 'organic' turkey for her one year...he didn't specify weight. Well, his bird was 48# (they couldn't get it in the fridge--it was the size of a small child). He had to quarter it in the workshop using the bandsaw. My last one, which was the "smallest" one available was 26#.

Here in SE Ontario, the first ones are available around October for Canadian Thanksgiving. I was able to get a 13-15 # then, a 17-20# one for Xmas, but the Easter turkey was the biggy. That was a $50+ turkey. I can't afford that anymore. But it was good--moist, tender, and tasty.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:20 PM   #9
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Take a look at the drumsticks on a good sized whole chicken fryer. If a fryer were proportional to the drumsticks I got, that chicken would be larger than a whole sized fryer chicken. Bigger isn't better. economical maybe.
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Old 01-09-2011, 04:04 PM   #10
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CWS this made me actually laugh out loud. Thanks.

Quote:
Well, his bird was 48# (they couldn't get it in the fridge--it was the size of a small child). He had to quarter it in the workshop using the bandsaw.
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