"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-26-2008, 10:42 AM   #11
Senior Cook
 
knight76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: NSW, Australia
Posts: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
There is no need to brine steak. If cooked properly it will not be dry.
Somehow I knew that was going to be the answer
__________________

__________________
Vegemite - Just say no!!
knight76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2008, 10:43 AM   #12
Sous Chef
 
bowlingshirt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Compton
Posts: 551
Put the breast between two layes of plastic wrap and gently use a mallet to flatten and even out the chicken. You should then be able to saute the breast to nice golden brown color on the outside while maintaining a juicy inside.
__________________

__________________
Official member of the club
Vegans die from arrogant smugness & sprout rot. - pighood
bowlingshirt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2008, 11:16 AM   #13
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,253
Quote:
Originally Posted by knight76 View Post
For the purpose of the fettuccine dish I would like to brown it as it will look better against the white of the sauce.

With brining - Couldn't you brine a nice thick piece of ribeye and then pat dry, sear and oven cook to finish for a nice juicy steak? I was reading in my link I posted about brining that you need to add some saltpeter to the brine to ensure the meat does not turn white during brining.

Brining doesn't really work with beef the way it works with pork, chicken and shrimp. So you shouldn't try to brine beef.

And NO, there is no reason to add saltpeter to a brine. Salt and sugar do not turn meat white.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2008, 02:26 PM   #14
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
If you need to brine beef--especially ribeye--to make it juicy, you've got problems.

For safety reasons, chicken *should* be cooked to a minimum of 160 degrees F to kill any possible salmonella, but chicken does go from a raw to cooked state at 140 degrees F. Regardless, if your chicken is not brined, cooking it higher than 165 will result in dry cardboard. If you don't have a thermometer, do the juice test. Poke a small hole in the chicken all the way to the center. If the juices run clear, you're good to go.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2008, 03:07 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
DaveSoMD's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,038
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowlingshirt View Post
Put the breast between two layes of plastic wrap and gently use a mallet to flatten and even out the chicken. You should then be able to saute the breast to nice golden brown color on the outside while maintaining a juicy inside.
Exact;y what I was going to post. I do this all the time with Bnls/Sknls breasts. The other option is to roast bone-in and skin-on breasts in the oven at 350 degrees. The fat from the skin wil help keep the breast meat moist.

Depends on what you are planning to use the chicken for.
__________________
DaveSoMD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2008, 03:16 PM   #16
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef View Post
If you don't have a thermometer, do the juice test. Poke a small hole in the chicken all the way to the center. If the juices run clear, you're good to go.
This is all accurate information. The only problem I have with this method is that juices will run clear at 185. They will run clear at 200. This method only tells you if the chicken is safe to eat because it has been cooked to a high enough temp. It does not tell you if you have overcooked it. Of course if you do not have a thermometer then it is a great way to know if you cooked the chicken until done.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2008, 03:33 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
My thermometer must be 15 degrees off, because the breastmeat of the chicken I cook is always cooked to 180 and has never resulted in dry cardboard. And I don't let it raise to 180, it is 180 when it comes off the grill over stove.
I'll have to check my digital probe against my old dial thermometer.
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2008, 03:48 PM   #18
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,253
Pacanis

180 is way too much for breast meat. Plus if it's 180 when you take it off the heat it''ll be 190 or more after, accounting for carry-over temperature. Just the physics of cooking means that that meat will, in fact be drier that meat cooked to a lower temperature.

Your thermometer may not be to blame. Take the chicken off the heat at 160 and cover it for a few minutes. Then cut into it. I'll bet you $$$ that it will be fully cooked and pretty juicey.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2008, 04:49 PM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
I'll give it a try next time, Jennyema, after I compare two thermometers, but the thermomter must be off for what I've been reading. Because believe me, I'm the last person that will eat a chicken breast if it is dry. I don't even like white meat.
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2008, 04:51 PM   #20
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
You don't need to compare two thermometers. Just boil some water and put the one thermometer in. It should read 212 (assuming you are at sea level).
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.