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Old 06-27-2008, 09:01 AM   #31
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Knight,
Is the chicken going to be in chunks or pieces in your dish?
If so, I find it turns out best to sort-of poach it... I'm not suure what you call it what I do. It's not browning....
Cut chicken into 1/2 to 3/4 inch chunks, (or desired size for mucnhing) heat a TB or so of oil in non-stick pan.
Add all chicken at once... it will get very liquidy in the bottom, dont pour it off. Cook til white all the way thru. Maybe 5-7 min?
I find the combo of oil / chicken juice keeps the chunks very moist.
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Old 06-27-2008, 11:10 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
I read somewhere when you cook a chicken and stick the thermometer in the breast it will read 180 when done and the thigh will read 160 when done.

That's backwards. It's 160 for white meat and 180 for dark meat.
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Old 06-27-2008, 01:35 PM   #33
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Hi, If I am grilling chicken pieces I marinade them in mixture of milk and olive oil for couple of hours first. It tenderizes the meat and doesn't taste dry.
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Old 06-27-2008, 03:20 PM   #34
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GB, Andy, I totally agree with you guys.
Like I said a few posts back, I think I transferred what I read for a whole chicken and applied it to doing chicken pieces. Next time you cook a whole bird, see it the breast doesn't register a higher temp than the thighs.
And I in turn will see if cooking chicken breasts to 180 using my thermomter is really cooking them lower than what it reads. I'll boil some water and take a reading.
So, does boiling water remain 212F? Or does it keep climbing once it reaches boiling point?
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Old 06-27-2008, 03:22 PM   #35
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the temp of boiling water stops climbing as soon as it boils. At sea level, boiling water will always be 212. It could be boiling for 4 hours and it would still be 212.
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Old 06-27-2008, 04:55 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
...Next time you cook a whole bird, see it the breast doesn't register a higher temp than the thighs...

This was never in question. It's just not what gives you the best results. You have to keep cooking the bird after the breasts reach 160F until the thighs reach 180F.
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Old 06-27-2008, 07:02 PM   #37
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For the creamy fettuccine dish I am going to cook, I am not sure which way I will go yet. I have young kids so cutting into bite sized cubes would make more sense as they can't but it up themselves. They love pasta though.
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Old 06-27-2008, 07:20 PM   #38
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If you are going to roast your chicken breasts, try this method. The meat tastes seasoned ALL the way through, as if it has been brined:
Preheat your oven to 450F and line a 9X13 metal pan with foil. If you have a rack that will fit in the pan, so much the better.

Take two large and meaty (about 1.5 lbs each) whole chicken breasts, not split, complete with skin and bone. Stand them in the pan, letting the ribs make a sort of rack for them to stand on.

Make a paste of 2 TBS soft butter and 2 tsp salt. Gently lift the skin from the breasts and use a spoon to insert 1/4 of this mixture under each half of each breast. Pat it gently to spread it around. Then, turn the breasts over and salt and pepper liberally. Rub about a TBS of oil all over the top of the breasts and then liberally pepper them.

Roast at 450F for 35-40 minutes, until an instant thermometer reads 160F. Remove from oven, cover with foil, and let them rest about 10 minutes, then carve. There is enough juice left in the pan to make gravy, sauces, or just pour over the chicken.

This chicken meat was SO juicy and well-seasoned. Very tender. You can use your imagination and come up with lots of seasoning ideas, but this is just a basic start.

When I saute chicken breasts for this fettucine dish, I use very thinly sliced chicken that I buy here already sliced (a la Milanesa). But you can take a boneless skinless breast and do that yourself. Slice about a half inch off at a time (from the top), not quite all the way through, turn it around, slice again, etc. You will end up with a "sheet" of chicken. I cut these into manageable pieces and fry them in my cast iron skillet in a mixture of butter and oil, very hot, very fast, just a few minutes on a side. Then I slice them into strips. Use them for many things at that point....
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Old 06-27-2008, 09:53 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by knight76 View Post
I am going to be cooking one of the creamy pasta recipe's from my other thread but am after tips on how to saute or fry chicken so it does not come out dry?

Chicken for me, seems to cook through, but be dry and quite hard. I am guessing sauteing in butter would help this but what is the secret for this?

I tend to cook chicken so it is completely white all the way through as I am worried about being poisoned.
Hi Knight76,

You entitled this thread "SAUTÉEING AND GRILLING".

The reality is that, when it comes to cooking, they are two entirely different and discrete methods of cooking. The heat source and direction, at least in classical cooking, comes from a different direction for each method.

When an item is to be sautéed, the heat source comes from below, as in a frying pan or saucepan, and the heat may be regulated to ensure that the food cooks with or without browning (more heat reqiures to be applied for browning and less for sautéeing without browning as for cooking chicken fillets as in poéle which is cooking without colouring, IIRC. This method is used for classic dishes such as Veal Tallyrand or Fricassé de Poulet a l`Ancienne as described by Simone Beck, Louisette Bertholle and Julia Child on pages 282-285, of their seminal text "Mastering the Art of French Cooking".

Grilling (conceptually and practically) is a method which has gone through some degrees of change in the last 20 years as the word "griddling" or process of cooking on a "griddle pan" has entered the culinary repetoire. Grilling traditionally meant the subjection of an item to heat from above and was used for whole fish like lemon/dover sole or fish steaks or meat (filet, lamb noisettes etc.,) which required the application of heat from above and turning half way through cooking.

Ridged "Griddle pans" have enabled people to cook the same items, dare I say, short order items on a griddle (base heat) as opposed to a grill or commercially via a salamander (top heat). Essentially, the items need to be composed of short fibres like those of fish or in the case of meat, derived from cuts from the body which are less exercised and short in terms of fibre length, connective tissue content such as filet, ribeye, noisettes of lamb etc.

More tomorrow!!!!
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Old 06-28-2008, 02:29 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by archiduc View Post
Hi Knight76,

You entitled this thread "SAUTÉEING AND GRILLING".

The reality is that, when it comes to cooking, they are two entirely different and discrete methods of cooking. The heat source and direction, at least in classical cooking, comes from a different direction for each method.

When an item is to be sautéed, the heat source comes from below, as in a frying pan or saucepan, and the heat may be regulated to ensure that the food cooks with or without browning (more heat reqiures to be applied for browning and less for sautéeing without browning as for cooking chicken fillets as in poéle which is cooking without colouring, IIRC. This method is used for classic dishes such as Veal Tallyrand or Fricassé de Poulet a l`Ancienne as described by Simone Beck, Louisette Bertholle and Julia Child on pages 282-285, of their seminal text "Mastering the Art of French Cooking".

Grilling (conceptually and practically) is a method which has gone through some degrees of change in the last 20 years as the word "griddling" or process of cooking on a "griddle pan" has entered the culinary repetoire. Grilling traditionally meant the subjection of an item to heat from above and was used for whole fish like lemon/dover sole or fish steaks or meat (filet, lamb noisettes etc.,) which required the application of heat from above and turning half way through cooking.

Ridged "Griddle pans" have enabled people to cook the same items, dare I say, short order items on a griddle (base heat) as opposed to a grill or commercially via a salamander (top heat). Essentially, the items need to be composed of short fibres like those of fish or in the case of meat, derived from cuts from the body which are less exercised and short in terms of fibre length, connective tissue content such as filet, ribeye, noisettes of lamb etc.

More tomorrow!!!!
Now this is a more supercillious post wouldn't you say Michael in FtW?

Good points archiduc, I guess by grilling I meant more like griddling. Just the term Griddling has not really permeated the Australian cooking vernacular.
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