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Old 11-22-2006, 09:44 AM   #11
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KE, you could just put some apple juice in a spritz bottle and spray that over the bird to baste it. Are you going to put some apple juice in a pan near the heat source in the smoker? That might put some extra moisture into the smoker to help keep the bird from drying out.
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Old 11-22-2006, 10:17 AM   #12
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Darn - OK, it as only in overnight, I'll take it out of the brine since I did have salt in it. Thanks guys.

Allen - yes, I always put apple juice in the water pan of my smoker for most everything I love the flavor.

GB, do you think just overnight hurt it?
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Old 11-22-2006, 10:19 AM   #13
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Well it did do something. If it hurt it or not, I can't say. I am sure it will turn out great no matter what. Just make sure to watch the cooking temp, as I am sure you will, and it will be delicious!
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Old 11-22-2006, 12:18 PM   #14
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Here is an excellent recipe for smoked brined turkey...we have used it numerous times.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/reci...ml?rsrc=search

That is a big bird. I'd recommend smoking the turkey until the skin is brown and lovely, then covering with foil and finishing in the oven. Also, if you cook it breast down, at least for a while, the fat from the back will run down over the breast and help make it juicer.

I've cooked a lot of big Tom's, and never had a problem with them being dry. Actually, the bigger the turkey, the better the bargain, as the percentage of meat to bone goes up as the turkey gets larger.
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Old 11-22-2006, 01:11 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
Here is an excellent recipe for smoked brined turkey...we have used it numerous times.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/reci...ml?rsrc=search

Thanks for sharing the recipe. I was under the impression from other sources that a Turkey should be cooked to around 175-180 mark. According to this recipe, it says up to 160.

What do the rest of you cook your turkey to?

-Brad
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Old 11-22-2006, 01:22 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by candelbc
Thanks for sharing the recipe. I was under the impression from other sources that a Turkey should be cooked to around 175-180 mark. According to this recipe, it says up to 160.

What do the rest of you cook your turkey to?

-Brad
Brad, the assumption is that carryover heat will continue to raise the internal temperature another 20 degrees (or so) before it starts to cool.

In another Good Eats episode for deep frying a turkey, he takes it out at 151 F to allow for carryover.
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Old 11-22-2006, 03:55 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Andy M.
Brad, the assumption is that carryover heat will continue to raise the internal temperature another 20 degrees (or so) before it starts to cool.

In another Good Eats episode for deep frying a turkey, he takes it out at 151 F to allow for carryover.
That's what I was wondering. Since I am smoking in colder outdoor temperatures, is this still true?

I saw both episodes, but obviously didn't pay enough attention.

-Brad
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Old 11-22-2006, 04:55 PM   #18
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Since you're smoking at a lower temperature, there won't be as much of a temperature differential from the outer surface to the innermost flesh. As a result there will be less carryover. I can't guess here. The safe thing to do is continue to cook to 160F and any carryover will raise the temp to a rreasonable level without overcooking.
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Old 11-22-2006, 07:00 PM   #19
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My husband smokes wonderful turkeys. He takes them out at 155 or 160, wraps in foil, and lets stand in the house for about an hour.
He's home now, so I'm able to ask him questions. He says while he prefers the smaller ones, he has done up to 18 lbs, and that a 22 pounder is no problem...it just takes longer.
Do understand that a turkey is not solid meat...it has a large cavity inside it.
We fill that cavity with chunks of onion, orange, lemon, a halved head of garlic, salt, pepper, fresh sage, parsley, hearts of celery with leaves, and thyme.
We rub the outside with a halved lemon, then olive oil, salt, pepper, and sage. Kim then gives it a good sprinkling of Bayou Blast (Cajun Seasoning) just to give it a little "BAM!


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Old 11-24-2006, 05:57 PM   #20
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GB, I ended up leaving it in the brine overnight - it wasn't mushy at all and it was the most flavorful and moist white meat! I will smoke my turkey from now on. I ended up finishing it in the oven because after 8 and "some" hours it was still at 120° and fast approaching the dinner hour. I'm glad I did because I had made a gravy from just the stock and while it was OK the pan drippings from being in the oven made it a rich very dark brown gravy and then I thinned it out with the stock gravy.

Thank you everyone (Allen, Andy, GB, TATT) and all who put up with my continuous questions and lack of confidence!!!!!!
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