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Old 11-19-2013, 10:04 PM   #11
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I read tonight that there is no buttery flavor at all, but the name came from the large broad breasts. I don't have any concrete proof of that though.

Apparently the frozen ones always have a solution, and there are some fresh that do and some fresh that don't, one has a slightly different label than the other.
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Old 11-19-2013, 10:07 PM   #12
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I thought Butterballs were injected with "buttery flavour".
Nope. Only some of them and then not butter flavor. Artificial butter flavor would be impossibly disgusting.
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Old 11-19-2013, 10:12 PM   #13
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After a few subpar results, I've decided against the farmed turkey brands and now only do Bell and Evans or organic. I still brine,so a heritage would be a waste of money.
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Old 11-19-2013, 11:46 PM   #14
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Someone can have my turkey. It's about the only meat that I just really don't care for.

Seriously, my wife gets a Butterball turkey from her work and, in what's become an annual tradition, we always donate it to a local homeless shelter.
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Old 11-19-2013, 11:48 PM   #15
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Jenny, one time I bought a Bell and Evans chicken. I wanted to see what all the hoopla was about. I hate white meat on chicken or turkey. I even ate the white meat on this one and didn't even need gravy to cover it up. It just melted in my mouth. Worth every single cent. But not something I could afford on a regular basis. So I settle for just the legs and thighs from your standard run of the mill chickens. Preferably thighs only.
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Old 11-20-2013, 12:03 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Someone can have my turkey. It's about the only meat that I just really don't care for.

Seriously, my wife gets a Butterball turkey from her work and, in what's become an annual tradition, we always donate it to a local homeless shelter.
Same here.

One place I worked paid for a Xmas bird. They thought I was weird when I said I didn't want a turkey. They let me buy a goose instead and bring them the bill.
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Old 11-20-2013, 12:24 AM   #17
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Same here.

One place I worked paid for a Xmas bird. They thought I was weird when I said I didn't want a turkey. They let me buy a goose instead and bring them the bill.
One place I worked they gave out expensive bottle of whiskey. Chevris Regal. Just what I needed. Me, the Carrie Nations of Boston.

A friend of mine who worked with the street alcoholics took the bottle to a liquor store and exchanged it for a gallon of their cheapest whiskey. On Sunday, (before the stores were open on Sundays) he would find them on the street really sick because they needed a drink. He carried paper cups and the bottles in his trunk. He would pour them about an 8 oz. cup to hold them over until the stores opened. I know you are going to say he wasn't really helping them. But withdrawal from alcohol cold turkey can be very dangerous. Starting with the DT's. These were street people who slept on the streets all year long. They needed a drink more than food. Occasionally if one of them was already starting to have the DT's, he would either call an ambulance or take them to the hospital himself. I use to go with him on Sunday when he made his rounds.
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Old 11-20-2013, 01:17 AM   #18
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No Addie, I do understand about DTs. I once worked in a hospital in Denmark. A fifty something year old alcoholic "bum" was brought in because he had been hit by a car (not the driver's fault). He had a few broken bones, including a broken jaw. His jaw was wired shut, so he had a feeding tube. He also had an IV drip and a catheter. He had DTs and was pulling everything out and fighting with the staff. He had no idea what was going on or where he was. They tried a tranquilizer, but by the time they gave him enough to see any reaction, it was enough to make him unconscious. They got him breathing and then seven doctors discussed what to do about him. They finally decided on the suggestion of the Russian doctor. They gave him alcohol IV and then slowly weened him off of it. That worked.

I saw him a week later, and I couldn't recognize him. He looked so much better. He also apologized for fighting with me, even though he didn't remember it. Other staff had told him.
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Old 11-20-2013, 04:13 AM   #19
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part of my voluntary work brings me into contact with homeless/addicted youngsters from salford,parts of which are some of the most deprived,crime riddled,violent & drug infested in the uk.it is very rare to come across a drug addict or alcholic.they usually have both addictions with psychosis as a result.visions & voices etc.they will usually be on a cocktail of methadone,benzodiazepine & anti psychotics,plus drugs to conteract the side effects of the "treatment"drugs.they also buy diazepine,crack,weed & other illegal drugs on the street.to give someone alcohol in that situation may well make them vomit.if they have just taken their "meds" they would bring those up too.they would then,most likely,start to "rattle" then nosedive into a coma.
not good advice to administer alcohol on the streets,you don't know what else the recipient is taking.it may well kill them.
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Old 11-20-2013, 11:23 AM   #20
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Good point Harry.
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