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Old 07-17-2005, 10:52 AM   #1
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Turduckin

Sounded interesting so decided to post.

TURDUCKEN

This is a turkey stuffed with a duck, stuffed with a chicken stuffed with dressing. You will need toothpicks and kitchen string for this recipe. " Original recipe yield: 12 servings.


INGREDIENTS:

3 pounds whole chicken, boned
salt and pepper to taste
Creole seasoning to taste
1 (4 pound) duck, boned
16 pounds turkey, boned

DIRECTIONS


Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). Lay the boned chicken skin-side down on a platter and season liberally with salt, pepper and Creole seasoning. Lay the boned duck skin-side down on top of the chicken and season liberally with salt, pepper and Creole seasoning. Cover and refrigerate.


Lay the boned turkey skin-side down on a flat surface. Cover with a layer of cold Sausage and Oyster Dressing and push the dressing into the leg and wing cavities so they will look as if they still have bones in them.

Lay the duck on top of the turkey skin-side down and cover it with a layer of cold dressing. Lay the chicken on top of the duck skin-side down and cover it with a layer of cold dressing.


With the help of an assistant, bring the edges of the turkey skin up and fasten them together with toothpicks. Use the kitchen string to lace around the toothpicks to help hold the stuffed turkey together. Carefully place the turducken, breast up in a large roasting pan.


Roast covered for 4 hours or until the turducken is golden brown. Continue to roast uncovered for 1 hour or until a meat thermometer inserted through the thigh registers 180 degrees F. and a thermometer inserted through the stuffing registers 165 degrees F. Check the turducken every few hours to baste and remove excess liquid. There will be enough pan juices for a gallon of gravy. Carve and serve.

Sausage and Oyster Dressing



INGREDIENTS:

1 pound pork sausage

16 ounces unseasoned dry bread stuffing mix

2 (8 ounce) cans oyster pieces, liquid reserved

2 cups chopped celery

1 onion, chopped

Place sausage in a large, deep skillet. Cook and crumble over medium high heat until evenly brown.
In a large bowl combine the dry bread stuffing with the sausage and pan juices. Stir in the oyster pieces and liquid, chopped celery, chopped onion, and butter.

Add the broth/liquid a little at a time until the dressing is moist but not soggy. Season to taste with salt, pepper and Creole seasoning. Refrigerate until cold and stuff in turducken


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Old 07-17-2005, 01:18 PM   #2
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I purchased a Turduckin in AZ as a Xmas present for a friend. It was amazing. She said it was very tasty.
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Old 07-17-2005, 03:16 PM   #3
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I believe the recipe originated with Paul Prudhomme.

There is a recipe for it in his "The Prudhomme Family Cookbook."

Each boned fowl has a different dressing: the turkey an andouille dressing, the duck one of cornbread, and the chicken is dressed with an oyster stuffing.

Always wanted to make it but it is just so time consuming.

Yes, I know you can buy them on the web, but they are quite dear.

Maybe, just maybe, will do so this year.

But probably not.
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Old 07-17-2005, 04:03 PM   #4
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I wanted to make one too, but doubt very much that I will. Unless you have a gang of people coming over.........
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Old 07-17-2005, 04:13 PM   #5
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I think it's actually a variation of an old medieval dish; and there were about 6 or 7 different size birds used!
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Old 07-17-2005, 05:29 PM   #6
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I think you're right. I think the original recipe was with smaller game birds like pigeon, grouse, and so on up to ducks and a goose... The turkey was a much later addition, after the Americas were discovered
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Old 07-17-2005, 06:15 PM   #7
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Cool, thanks for the info. Found it at a site and thought it was funny. Didn't realize that people really make this.
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Old 07-17-2005, 08:11 PM   #8
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THE NAME IS GROSS!
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Old 07-18-2005, 01:22 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by auntdot
I believe the recipe originated with Paul Prudhomme.

There is a recipe for it in his "The Prudhomme Family Cookbook."
The idea of wrapping smaller birds inside successively larger birds might be midievil in origin ( I know I've run across that somewhere before ) - but Paul Prudhomme get's credit for the the Cajun Turdukin! And, if anyone wonders why auntdot and I are too lazy to type in Paul Prudhomme's recipe - it's because it's 5 1/2 pages long!!! (The Prudhomme Family Cookbook - pages 109-115).

Tony Chachere has a good product for those less adventurious (either in spirit or pocketbook) - if you can find them - they run about $10. It's a frozen 3-lb deboned chicken stuffed with either rice and crawfish, rice and shrimp, cornbread dressing, rice dressing, or pork sausage. I've tried them all and it's a tough call on which is my favorite ... but I lean towards the rice and crawfish. Trust me, if you like Cajun food - once you wrap a lip around one of these you'll eat 'till your eyes bug out!

Someday I'll learn how to debone a chicken from the inside ...
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Old 07-18-2005, 03:32 AM   #10
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The chicken would be stinking before I could debone it from the inside. I have a difficult enough time separating a chicken breast from its bone when they cut it at the grocery. I have no problems deboning a chicken breast when it is a whole chicken, its just the weird way they cut it at the store.
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