"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-31-2011, 02:04 PM   #11
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,339
Quote:
Originally Posted by chopper View Post
Attachment 12708



Attachment 12709

These are the best things for lifting a Turkey. They are called bear claws. The mail order place they came from (20 years ago) is no longer in business. It was called Walter Drake. I have seen other turkey lifters but none as great as these.

Also a great tool for shredding pork shoulder for pulled pork.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2011, 02:19 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: va by way of upstate ny
Posts: 4,442
makes you feel like cooking a bird just so you can get to use your cool handle claws, doesn't it?
__________________

__________________
vitauta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2011, 08:17 PM   #13
Executive Chef
 
chopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Colorado
Posts: 4,345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.

Also a great tool for shredding pork shoulder for pulled pork.
They DO work great for pulled pork!
If you don't have them you are missing out on a lot of fun times in the kitchen!
__________________
No matter where I serve my guests, it seems they like my kitchen best!
chopper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2012, 01:17 AM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,698
i want a pair of those to use on the scratching post just to freak out the cats...
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2012, 01:38 AM   #15
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,277
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
i want a pair of those to use on the scratching post just to freak out the cats...
I need a pair to keep Shrek's back scratched.
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2012, 08:01 PM   #16
Executive Chef
 
chopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Colorado
Posts: 4,345
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
i want a pair of those to use on the scratching post just to freak out the cats...

Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
I need a pair to keep Shrek's back scratched.


I actually used them today...not to scratch anything, but to lift my ham out of the pan and on to the platter. They are so easy to fit into the dishwasher too!
__________________
No matter where I serve my guests, it seems they like my kitchen best!
chopper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 09:04 AM   #17
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1
Resurrection alert!

There is an "easy way" to roast a bird, but I don't agree with the OP. I've never roasted a dry, flavorless chicken or turkey in my life. In fact I just roasted two chickens last night, and the diners couldn't stop commenting on how juicy and flavorful they were, especially the breast meat.

I do not cook breast side down. Never have, so I've never had to flip a bird midway through cooking. I do not use a thermometer, aluminum foil, roasting bags, or a roasting rack. All of this seems like unnecessary fuss to me, and the furthest thing from "easy".

I have always cooked my birds in a mixture of oil, water, and whatever seasonings I chose at the bottom of whatever pan I use. I keep the meat moist by making many tiny slits in the bird, deep enough to catch whatever seasoned liquid I marinate/baste with, but small enough to go undetected when serving. The combination of the oil/water mixture, and the slits, never fails to keep my birds extremely moist and tender. And this method cuts down significantly on the need to baste often.

Try it, and see how it works for you.
__________________
Iwishyouwell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 09:43 AM   #18
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 2,409
I looked the bear claws up on Google. They are $9.99 but shipping charges are 7.99. I refuse to pay those exorbitant shipping charges, so won't be ordering them.
__________________
I can resist anything, but temptation. Oscar Wilde
lyndalou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 09:48 AM   #19
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,407
I also disagree with the OP that his way is the ONLY way to cook a turkey. Being that he's from Texas, I'm sure he's convinced himself that his method is the standard that others must live up to, but, just like the proverbial cat-skinning, there are several ways to accomplish this task and still have a tasty and juicy bird (WITH skin, I should add. This is a necessity as far as I'm concerned). These include, but are certainly not limited to, roasting, deep frying, and smoking.

My plan for this year is to try turkey on our rotisserie grill. I've had outstanding chickens and roasts cooked this way over the summer months, and they always come out juicy and falling-off-the-bone tender. The only remaining question in my mind is whether it will be warm enough to do so in November. Hopefully the weather cooperates.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 12:30 PM   #20
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
I'll stick to my guns too. I roast, skin side up, either in a 425' oven, or between beds of charcoal, with wood for smoke. In the oven, the pan bottom serves as the drip pan, with plain water added, but not touching the bird. On the Webber, the drip pan is placed between the charcoal beds, and the vents are all closed half way. With both methods, the skin is oiled, or buttered, and seasoned with salt and granulated garlic. No basting, no fussing, not turning, no anything. Just leave it be until the meat thermometer reads 1645' in the thickest part of the meat.

The bird, be it turkey of any size, game hens, ruffed grouse, or chicken, come out ridiculously juicy, well flavored, and tender. I wish you could hear what people say about them, and not just my family.

Again, the only think I need to worry about after prepping, is pull the bird at 165' F. Let it rest for 15 to 20 minutes, depending on the bird size. Carve.

I'm not going to say that my way is the only way, or even the best way. I am going to say that it's the best way for me.

It is the easiest way I know to cook a bird.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
other, turkey

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.