"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-29-2015, 09:19 PM   #31
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
If you heat the pan with the drippings on the stove top, all the water will cook off. You are left with turkey fat and solids. If you sprinkle flour onto the fat and stir/cook it, you have made a roux. Then you add stock to make gravy.
This is how my mom taught me to make turkey gravy Browning the flour in the fat adds more flavor, as it does with just about anything.
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2015, 09:23 PM   #32
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
For me, a flour slurry is easier to handle than a roux, as you can always add more slurry if the gravy isn't thick enough. Just shake flour and stock in a jar.

Naturally, the gravy must be simmered and stirred long enough to cook out the flour taste.
You can add a slurry to a roux-based gravy, too, if necessary. I think browning flour in fat tastes better than just cooking it in liquid, but of course, YMMV.
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2015, 09:50 PM   #33
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
You can take out some of the fat and leave just what you want.

The dried up juices will reconstitute when you add liquid to deglaze the pan.
That's exactly what I did with the ice cubes coated with fat.

At any rate, it seems everyone was happy with their own gravy and that's what counts. Hmm, I wonder if there's a gravy cook off contest??
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2015, 07:42 AM   #34
Head Chef
 
letscook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Finger Lakes of NY
Posts: 1,879
I make my gravy a couple of day ahead. I buy turkey wings & drumsticks ahead of time, Roasted them in the oven with onion,celery, carrots, clove of garlic, s&p and little poultry seasoning. Then I remove everything and put into a pot, add a little water or broth to the roast pan to get all the good stuff on the pan and put all that in the pot. Then cover with water and let it simmer till all the meat has falling off the bones and leaves a nice rich stock I then make my gravy from that. Its is delicious . After the dinner I remove all the meat from the turkey and save the bones in a container in the freezer for turkey broth or soup later on with some more fresh wings or parts added. The drippings I either added to my already made gravy or freeze them for later,
__________________
One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching
letscook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2015, 07:53 AM   #35
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
That's exactly what I did with the ice cubes coated with fat.

At any rate, it seems everyone was happy with their own gravy and that's what counts. Hmm, I wonder if there's a gravy cook off contest??
Apparently there are lots of them!

https://www.google.com/search?q=gravy+cook-off
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2015, 08:17 AM   #36
Senior Cook
 
puffin3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Duncan
Posts: 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
You can add a slurry to a roux-based gravy, too, if necessary. I think browning flour in fat tastes better than just cooking it in liquid, but of course, YMMV.
When the flour is first browned it has been dextrinized.
" Best Answer: 1) When flour is heated until brown, the starch granules undergo a process known as dextrinization. Dextrins are fragments of starch molecules composed of chains of glucose molecules. When they are dissolved in water, they have a sweet taste, and contribute to the color and pleasant flavor of brown gravies. As the starch undergoes dextrinization, it loses its thickening power. Extensive dextrinization, as occurs when flour is browned with dry heat, may cut the thickening power by as much as one half. " Once I started dextrinizing the flour the result was/is an excellent tasting gravy somewhat lighter than a gravy using non-dextrinized flour.
For cooks who like to experiment try dextrinizing the APF. See what you think.
The only tricky part is understanding how much flour to use.
__________________
puffin3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2015, 08:22 AM   #37
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,380
Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
...As the starch undergoes dextrinization, it loses its thickening power. Extensive dextrinization, as occurs when flour is browned with dry heat, may cut the thickening power by as much as one half. "...
When making a darker roux with plain flour, the same thing happens. As the roux darkens, it loses its thickening power. So I'd guess a form of dextrinization occurs in the making of a roux.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2015, 11:52 AM   #38
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 2,841
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
No, you had said you didn't know what they would think about brown gravy, as opposed to milk gravy.

Roux is so easy to make, and so cheap, why do you need a mix?

With the fat removed, the drippings are just juices - essentially flavored water. They won't float - just whisk them into any new poultry gravy you make.
Misunderstanding then. My comment was regarding using milk for gravy and that I have never used milk, unless I'm making a white gravy. And that folks down south call it milk gravy. I read that someone used milk in turkey gravy.

Yes, roux is easy, but the mix saved me at least one step and at least one pan to wash and saved me the time it takes to make the roux.
This was sort of an experiment as I never made thanksgiving in advance. Most likely next year I make traditional turkey gravy as its also easy.

The floater would be for the soup and does not necessarily have to float. But would be called a floater in my mind as i would put some onto the top center of the soup just before serving.
Seems it would be a waste to pour the drippings into turkey soup stock.
We are done with gravy. This is about soup.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
For me, a flour slurry is easier to handle than a roux, as you can always add more slurry if the gravy isn't thick enough. Just shake flour and stock in a jar.
Naturally, the gravy must be simmered and stirred long enough to cook out the flour taste.
I used this method long before I found out about roux. Its how my mother made gravy. I think roux makes a better gravy and is a better thickener.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
This is how my mom taught me to make turkey gravy Browning the flour in the fat adds more flavor, as it does with just about anything.
Agree. I always cook my roux to the color I am pairing with. Beef gravy gets a darker color and turkey gets a lighter color.

Quote:
Originally Posted by letscook View Post
I make my gravy a couple of day ahead. I buy turkey wings & drumsticks ahead of time, Roasted them in the oven with onion,celery, carrots, clove of garlic, s&p and little poultry seasoning. Then I remove everything and put into a pot, add a little water or broth to the roast pan to get all the good stuff on the pan and put all that in the pot. Then cover with water and let it simmer till all the meat has falling off the bones and leaves a nice rich stock I then make my gravy from that. Its is delicious . After the dinner I remove all the meat from the turkey and save the bones in a container in the freezer for turkey broth or soup later on with some more fresh wings or parts added. The drippings I either added to my already made gravy or freeze them for later,
This is how I make stock. Roast everything in oven till nice and brown, then transfer to stock pot and simmer for hours.
GG helped me to do it this way as I have been browning everything in the pot instead of the oven. Oven is much easier.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
When making a darker roux with plain flour, the same thing happens. As the roux darkens, it loses its thickening power. So I'd guess a form of dextrinization occurs in the making of a roux.
Thanks Andy. I did notice that myself. Was not sure why though.
__________________
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2015, 12:39 PM   #39
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Yes, roux is easy, but the mix saved me at least one step and at least one pan to wash and saved me the time it takes to make the roux.
I make the roux in the roasting pan as Andy described above, so no extra pan. I use prepared foods regularly, but since I became disabled and had to quit work, I developed an aversion to buying certain things, like packet mixes, when I have the ingredients in my kitchen already

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
This was sort of an experiment as I never made thanksgiving in advance. Most likely next year I make traditional turkey gravy as its also easy.
I'm glad it worked out for you

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
The floater would be for the soup and does not necessarily have to float. But would be called a floater in my mind as i would put some onto the top center of the soup just before serving.
Seems it would be a waste to pour the drippings into turkey soup stock.
We are done with gravy. This is about soup.
Well, it gets into the stock one way or the other. What you do with the stock after that doesn't matter. I don't see how putting some in each bowl is different from putting all of it into the stock.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2015, 01:22 PM   #40
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,398
Quote:
Originally Posted by Domestic Goddess View Post
... I let the pan drippings sit overnight (in a glass bowl with a lid) in the refrigerator. The next day the fat hardens and comes to the surface of the bowl, which I then scrape it off, and make the gravy.
...
Do you mean to say that you prepare your turkey a day ahead?
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
gravy, recipe, turkey

Turkey Gravy This is the gravy I make after I've prepared the [URL]http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f15/herb-roasted-turkey-52425.html[/URL] (Baked in Oven Cooking Bag), and may I say it's some of "the best" tasting gravy I've ever had. I let the pan drippings sit overnight (in a glass bowl with a lid) in the refrigerator. The next day the fat hardens and comes to the surface of the bowl, which I then scrape it off, and make the gravy. (See *Note before preparing the gravy.) [SIZE=3]Turkey Gravy [/SIZE] 2 cups turkey drippings 1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper 1/4 teaspoon poultry seasoning 1 teaspoon chicken bouillon granules 1/4 cup flour 1 tablespoon flour 1/2 cup milk Combine the turkey drippings, pepper, poultry seasoning, and bouillon granules in a 1-quart saucepan; simmer over low heat for 5 minutes. While the pan drippings and spices are heating, combine the flour (the 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon) along the milk, in a jar with a tight fitting lid; shake until ingredients become smooth. Slowly add the milk mixture into the simmering broth; stirring constantly with a spoon. Continue to cook and stir, until the gravy is thick and bubbly, then serve. Yields: 2-1/2 cups of gravy *Note: If I roast a 19 lb. bird, I am able to double the gravy ingredients, and then I'll add the already cooked, cut-up turkey meat into the gravy. The gravy and turkey meat taste great served over hot-cooked mashed potatoes. Also, whenever I double the recipe, I then prepare the gravy in a 3-quart saucepan. 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.