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Old 11-24-2015, 10:39 PM   #1
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Thumbs up Turkey Gravy

This is the gravy I make after I've prepared the Herb Roasted Turkey (Baked in Oven Cooking Bag), and may I say it's some of "the best" tasting gravy I've ever had. I let the pan drippings sit overnight (in a glass bowl with a lid) in the refrigerator. The next day the fat hardens and comes to the surface of the bowl, which I then scrape it off, and make the gravy. (See *Note before preparing the gravy.)


Turkey Gravy

2 cups turkey drippings

1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper
1/4 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon chicken bouillon granules
1/4 cup flour
1 tablespoon flour
1/2 cup milk

Combine the turkey drippings, pepper, poultry seasoning, and bouillon granules in a 1-quart saucepan; simmer over low heat for 5 minutes.

While the pan drippings and spices are heating, combine the flour (the 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon) along the milk, in a jar with a tight fitting lid; shake until ingredients become smooth.

Slowly add the milk mixture into the simmering broth; stirring constantly with a spoon.

Continue to cook and stir, until the gravy is thick and bubbly, then serve.

Yields: 2-1/2 cups of gravy

*Note: If I roast a 19 lb. bird, I am able to double the gravy ingredients, and then I'll add the already cooked, cut-up turkey meat into the gravy. The gravy and turkey meat taste great served over hot-cooked mashed potatoes. Also, whenever I double the recipe, I then prepare the gravy in a 3-quart saucepan.

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Old 11-26-2015, 01:16 AM   #2
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Sounds good.
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Old 11-26-2015, 11:07 AM   #3
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Never used milk in gravy unless it was for white, sausage gravy to pour over biscuits.
They use milk a lot here in the south for gravy. Many just call it milk gravy.

I use the stock associated with the meat I am serving. Today it will be turkey stock to make turkey gravy.
Its actually a combo of chicken and turkey stock.
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Old 11-27-2015, 08:46 AM   #4
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I know what you mean. When I first moved to Texas, I used to make pan gravy for the chicken fried pieces of meat. Brown the flour, make a roux and add water with a little Gravy Master or Kitchen Bouquet. My neighbor thought I was crazy. She had never seen anyone make brown gravy for chicken fried anything. Everyone used milk. I just told her it was how crazy Yankees cooked.
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Old 11-27-2015, 09:31 AM   #5
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Milk gravy is another word for béchamel sauce. Have you ever made cheese sauce for macaroni and cheese? That's a variation of béchamel.
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Old 11-27-2015, 10:34 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Milk gravy is another word for béchamel sauce. Have you ever made cheese sauce for macaroni and cheese? That's a variation of béchamel.
It's Mornay sauce!
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Old 11-27-2015, 10:56 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Milk gravy is another word for béchamel sauce. Have you ever made cheese sauce for macaroni and cheese? That's a variation of béchamel.
Most of what I'd call gravy is a simple pan sauce, a bit from a real béchamel, although made with a similar process. What I consider as gravy starts with fat and fond from cooking meat, not with melted butter. Add flour to the fat to make your roux, then either water or milk (my mother used milk for chicken and turkey gravy, but water for pork and beef) and season to taste.

Gravy can also be made without a roux if there is a lot of flavorful juices in the pan, by making a slurry of water and flour and adding that to pan drippings, whisking as it's added to the drippings to avoid clumping the flour, then simmering for about 20 minutes to be sure that the flour is cooked.

I see béchamel as a much more pure sauce, made from a roux of butter and flour, then adding milk, salt and pepper, bring to a boil, then again simmer for about 20 minutes to ensure that there is no raw flour (this is the béchamel recipe from my Silver Spoon bible of Italian cooking). Most of the time, I only modify it with additional flavors after this point. For a garlic pasta sauce, I add garlic directly to the roux so that it sautées and infuses the butter. I also vary the thickness of the sauce depending on usage.
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Old 11-27-2015, 11:08 AM   #8
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I make your basic roux. I use 5 parts dextrinized APF and 5 parts unsalted clarified butter. Escoffier recommends equal parts. This gives the roux a grainy texture. I chill the roux before adding it into the hot turkey stock. Stirring constantly. No lumps happen.
Season with white pepper and Kosher salt.
That's it.
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Old 11-27-2015, 11:36 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
I make your basic roux. I use 5 parts dextrinized APF and 5 parts unsalted clarified butter. Escoffier recommends equal parts. This gives the roux a grainy texture. I chill the roux before adding it into the hot turkey stock. Stirring constantly. No lumps happen.
Season with white pepper and Kosher salt.
That's it.
You don't incorporate the pan drippings???
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Old 11-27-2015, 12:30 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
It's Mornay sauce!
You get a gold star! 🌟
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gravy, recipe, turkey

Turkey Gravy This is the gravy I make after I've prepared the [URL]http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f15/herb-roasted-turkey-52425.html[/URL] (Baked in Oven Cooking Bag), and may I say it's some of "the best" tasting gravy I've ever had. I let the pan drippings sit overnight (in a glass bowl with a lid) in the refrigerator. The next day the fat hardens and comes to the surface of the bowl, which I then scrape it off, and make the gravy. (See *Note before preparing the gravy.) [SIZE=3]Turkey Gravy [/SIZE] 2 cups turkey drippings 1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper 1/4 teaspoon poultry seasoning 1 teaspoon chicken bouillon granules 1/4 cup flour 1 tablespoon flour 1/2 cup milk Combine the turkey drippings, pepper, poultry seasoning, and bouillon granules in a 1-quart saucepan; simmer over low heat for 5 minutes. While the pan drippings and spices are heating, combine the flour (the 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon) along the milk, in a jar with a tight fitting lid; shake until ingredients become smooth. Slowly add the milk mixture into the simmering broth; stirring constantly with a spoon. Continue to cook and stir, until the gravy is thick and bubbly, then serve. Yields: 2-1/2 cups of gravy *Note: If I roast a 19 lb. bird, I am able to double the gravy ingredients, and then I'll add the already cooked, cut-up turkey meat into the gravy. The gravy and turkey meat taste great served over hot-cooked mashed potatoes. Also, whenever I double the recipe, I then prepare the gravy in a 3-quart saucepan. 3 stars 1 reviews
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