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Old 11-23-2004, 02:18 PM   #11
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Never heard of rubbing salt on it. What does that do for the bird?
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Old 11-23-2004, 02:21 PM   #12
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I would not think rubbing it with salt would be a good idea, but then again I have never tried it. Just doesn't sound like it would be beneficial and could actually make for a drier turkey.

Follow Jennyema's instructions and you will have the best turkey you have ever tasted.

I usually do not use sugar in my brine, but I have tried it and it does not make the meat sweet. The reason I usually don't use it is that I can be pretty lazy at times and salt and water is abut as simple as you can get
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Old 11-23-2004, 02:43 PM   #13
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Make sure the sodium content is low in the broth, or it may be too salty. Or you may want to back out some of the kosher salt.
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Old 11-23-2004, 02:45 PM   #14
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I think I would tend to agree that coating the bird with salt will draw moisture out of the cells. I'd like to hear more on the science of this. It seems like the opposite of brining.

Whereas, I know that brining works great.

Maybe I'll try a chicken coated in salt sometime though.
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Old 11-23-2004, 03:29 PM   #15
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Thanks for your replies everyone. I believe I saw the tip about salt on one of the foodnetwork programs. It is suppose to make the turkey moist. I guess I wont do it seeing as so many of you seem to think it will take moisture out of the turkey. Guess I'll just stick with the way I usually make it. I've never turned my turkey breast side down, but that sounds like a good idea, since it would make the moisture flow into the breast. One more question. Do you all prefer a metal roasting pan or the throw-a-way aluminum types with the handles? I bought the aluminum one, but am a bit weary that it may affect the flavor somehow. I've mostly used my metal roaster. I only bought the aluminum so I can toss it away. Any preferences?
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Old 11-23-2004, 04:00 PM   #16
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great replies and thanks, i will definitely air dry.

is it necessary to "cook" the sugar into solution, or is it okay to mix it cold as long as it dissolves?
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Old 11-23-2004, 04:01 PM   #17
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just let it dissolve
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Old 11-23-2004, 05:14 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amber
Do you all prefer a metal roasting pan or the throw-a-way aluminum types with the handles?
I do not like the throw-a-way aluminum types. They can be flimsy and the last thing you would want is to spend all that time and effort cooking that bird only to have it fall on the floor as you pull it out of the oven because the pan collapsed.

I am wondering if the salt thing you saw was a salt encrusted bird. I have seen it with chicken and fish, but never turkey, although in theory it should work for that as well. I don't remember exactly how to do it, but you take a lot (a real lot) of salt and mix with 1 egg (I think) and completely cover the bird. All you see is a mound of white salt. Then roast it and when it is done you crack open the salt and the bird inside is done, juicy, and not salty. Could this have been what you saw?
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Old 11-23-2004, 06:40 PM   #19
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The basic brining solution is always, in my book anyway, 1 gallon water plus 1 cup of salt plus 1 cup of sugar. I will also add herbs to the solution. The turkey I did last week, I used turbinado sugar because that's what I had the most of and hardly ever use it. The bird was one of those that was injected with brine. I still brined it because they don't inject all that much into the bird. I brined it for 24 hours. Stuffed the bird with celery, onion, and carrots to give it extra flavor.

Mayo is mostly oil, so it's like rubbing the turkey with a thick oil.

I roast my bird in a bag. I don't care about the appearance or the skin. I'm more interested in how it tastes and doing it in the bag, in my opinion, gives a superior roasted meat that doesn't shrink and is about as moist as it can get. Besides, roasting in the bag cuts out a significant amount of roasting time.
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Old 11-23-2004, 06:51 PM   #20
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Apple Cider-Brined Turkey with Savory Herb Gravy


Brine:
8 cups apple cider
2/3 cup kosher salt
2/3 cup sugar
1 tablespoon black peppercorns, coarsely crushed
1 tablespoon whole allspice, coarsely crushed
8 (1/8-inch-thick) slices peeled fresh ginger
6 whole cloves
2 bay leaves
1 (12-pound) fresh or frozen turkey, thawed
2 oranges, quartered
6 cups ice

Remaining ingredients:
4 garlic cloves
4 sage leaves
4 thyme sprigs
4 parsley sprigs
1 onion, quartered
1 (14-ounce) can fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and divided
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided
1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
Savory Herb Gravy

To prepare brine, combine first 8 ingredients in a large saucepan; bring to a boil. Cook 5 minutes or until sugar and salt dissolve. Cool completely.
Remove giblets and neck from turkey; reserve for Savory Herb Gravy. Rinse turkey with cold water; pat dry. Trim excess fat. Stuff body cavity with orange quarters. Place in non-metalic container. Add cider mixture and ice. Refrigerate for 12 to 24 hours,
Preheat oven to 500º.

Remove turkey from brine and discard brine, and orange quarters. Rinse turkey with cold water; pat dry. Lift wing tips up and over back; tuck under turkey. Tie legs together with kitchen string. Place garlic, sage, thyme, parsley, onion, and broth in the bottom of a roasting pan. Place roasting rack in pan. Arrange turkey, breast side down, on roasting rack. Brush turkey back with 1 tablespoon butter; sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon pepper and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Bake at 500º for 30 minutes.

Reduce oven temperature to 350º.

Remove turkey from oven. Carefully turn turkey over (breast side up) using tongs. Brush turkey breast with 1 tablespoon butter; sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon pepper and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Bake at 350º for 1 hour and 15 minutes or until a thermometer inserted into meaty part of thigh registers 170º (make sure not to touch bone). (Shield the turkey with foil if it browns too quickly.) Remove turkey from oven; let stand 20 minutes. Reserve pan drippings for Savory Herb Gravy. Discard skin before serving; serve with gravy.

Note: Nutritional analysis includes Savory Herb Gravy.

Yield: 12 servings (serving size: 6 ounces turkey and 3 tablespoons gravy)

CALORIES 338 (30% from fat); FAT 11.3g (satfat 4.2g, monofat 2.5g, polyfat 3g); PROTEIN 51.3g; CARBOHYDRATE 4.5g; FIBER 0.1g; CHOLESTEROL 138mg; IRON 3.3mg; SODIUM 770mg; CALCIUM 45mg;
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