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Old 11-16-2015, 01:23 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by lyndalou View Post
I am making a green bean casserole and a corn pudding. If I can assemble them ahead and refrigerate until the next day, that would be perfect. What do you think?
Absolutely, that will work. Fresh green beans can even be blanched ahead and finished the next day, as in this recipe: Sautéed Green Beans With Mushrooms and Caramelized Cipollini Onions | Serious Eats

And my MIL made a corn pudding in the microwave once that was delicious. IMO, just about everything but the turkey itself can be done ahead
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Old 11-16-2015, 01:27 PM   #22
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I have never cooked a bird breast-side down, on the grill, or in the oven. My turkeys come out ridiculously juicy and tender. Plus, I advise against this practice as accidentally dropping a hot bird into teh pan could result in scalded skin on the cook. I know what a severe burn feels like, not from cooking, but from a different kind of accident. The pain lasts for many months and is extreme.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
And that would be why you turn it ON/OVER THE RACK! If it drops, it falls on the rack, not into the juices in the pan. It's not a big deal to flip it if you use common sense. I can do it by myself but will admit it's A LOT easier if 2 people do it. And I've never dropped it.
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Old 11-16-2015, 02:00 PM   #23
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JMHO, I don't believe roasting a turkey breast side down, on its own, results in a juicier turkey. The juices run right past the breasts and into the pan. They don't get absorbed by the breasts.

If your turkey came out dry, it was overcooked.
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Old 11-16-2015, 02:02 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Absolutely, that will work. Fresh green beans can even be blanched ahead and finished the next day, as in this recipe: Sautéed Green Beans With Mushrooms and Caramelized Cipollini Onions | Serious Eats

And my MIL made a corn pudding in the microwave once that was delicious. IMO, just about everything but the turkey itself can be done ahead
So true. And it is like having leftovers the next day. And we all know how good leftovers are. The food has a chance to sit and develop flavor. YUM!
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Old 11-16-2015, 03:03 PM   #25
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JMHO, I don't believe roasting a turkey breast side down, on its own, results in a juicier turkey. The juices run right past the breasts and into the pan. They don't get absorbed by the breasts.

If your turkey came out dry, it was overcooked.
+1. I've tried both ways and didn't notice any difference. Three ways, if you want to count trying roasting bags.

Now I just take the bird from the fridge a couple of hours before roasting, pat it dry if it needs it, season with s and p, and sometimes I'll stuff an onion and herbs in the cavity. Oven preheated to 425, and the bird gets tented with foil towards the end if it needs it. The giblets (except the liver) are cooked as soon as they're thawed enough to remove from the cavity and used in bread dressing and gravy, along with the broth they were cooked in.

So many ways to cook a delicious bird, this is just how I do it. Simple and with the least fuss possible. I save the fuss for the sides.

Oh, and speaking of sides - I absolutely make most of them the day before. The less preparation and clean up the day of the dinner, the better.
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Old 11-16-2015, 10:19 PM   #26
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For the last few years, I've used my bread machine to make the dough for yeast rolls and then baked them in the oven. The dough can be made up to two days before and refrigerated after the first rise and shaping (I make the amount for nine rolls and put them in a round baking pan).

Take them out of the fridge to warm up and rise again, then bake. They're so easy and delicious!
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Old 11-16-2015, 10:59 PM   #27
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For the last few years, I've used my bread machine to make the dough for yeast rolls and then baked them in the oven. The dough can be made up to two days before and refrigerated after the first rise and shaping (I make the amount for nine rolls and put them in a round baking pan).

Take them out of the fridge to warm up and rise again, then bake. They're so easy and delicious!
I have been wanting a bread machine for years. As much as I enjoy the kneading of the dough by hand, severe arthritis has brought that to a halt. So maybe I should put it on my Christmas Wish List. I doubt I will get it, but I can wish.
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Old 11-16-2015, 11:20 PM   #28
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I love my bread machine.
I got the $60 Oster.
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Old 11-17-2015, 12:50 AM   #29
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The 1997 edition of Joy of Cooking recommends turning a chicken on it's side, then flipping to the other side, and finally roasting breast side up. They recommend flipping side to side every 30 minutes for a turkey and finishing breast side up.

"To be tender and juicy, the breast needs to be cooked to an internal temperature no greater than 165°F. The legs, meanwhile, must be cooked to 175° to 180°F, or else they will remain chewy and disturbingly pink. In roasting a turkey, then, the object is to encourage the legs to cook at a faster rate than the breast. Unfortunately, when you roast by the simple breast-up method, precisely the opposite happens. Exposed throughout roasting to the glaring heat of the oven roof and drained of juice by gravity's downward tug, the breast inevitably overcooks and dries out by the time the legs are done and the stuffing heated through."

My MIL and I roasted a turkey one year for Thanksgiving and only flipped it three times. It was wonderful. The breast was juicy enough for me (and I almost always find white meat too dry). It was, according to my BIL, "Not dry enough".
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Old 11-17-2015, 12:50 AM   #30
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Quote:
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I have been wanting a bread machine for years. As much as I enjoy the kneading of the dough by hand, severe arthritis has brought that to a halt. So maybe I should put it on my Christmas Wish List. I doubt I will get it, but I can wish.
Don't you have a KitchenAid mixer? Wouldn't that knead the bread for you?
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