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Old 11-20-2015, 05:37 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
One more turkey tip:
Roast your bird the day before it is to be served. Remove it from the oven and let it sit for twenty minutes of so. Remove the whole breast halves, the legs and thigh, and wings from the carcass. REmove the back meat as well. Slice the breasts against the grain so that each slice gets a bit of skin. Slice the dark meat from the thighs. Arrange all of the meat into an oven-proof, lidded pan along with off the juices. Place the stuffing into a covered casserole dish. Refrigerate everything overnight, with the turkey meat sitting in its own drippings. Season the drippings if needed with salt and a bit of sage. That juice will absorb back into the meat, even if it was accidentally over-cooked. When all is reheated to 140' F. in the oven, the meat will be very, very juicy, and full flavored from sitting it the broth overnight. Arrange it all attractively on a serving platter and make gravy from the drippings.

This method gives you a little wiggle room if the turkey is just a bit under, or overcooked. Your turkey will be perfect.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the Nort
What a good idea! It probably takes less space in the fridge that way and you don't have to try to remove the breast meat while the turkey is hot. I also prefer cutting off all the breast meat and cutting it across the grain. I do it with chicken too.
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Old 11-20-2015, 05:58 PM   #52
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When I was a child, my Dad (a butcher by trade) would cut up a whole turkey for us and Mom would start roasting the dark meat for a time before adding the white, ending up with both dark and white meat done to perfection at the same time. I haven't done that myself, but logic would say it's the perfect solution.
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Old 11-21-2015, 11:09 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
One more turkey tip:
Roast your bird the day before it is to be served. Remove it from the oven and let it sit for twenty minutes of so. Remove the whole breast halves, the legs and thigh, and wings from the carcass. REmove the back meat as well. Slice the breasts against the grain so that each slice gets a bit of skin. Slice the dark meat from the thighs. Arrange all of the meat into an oven-proof, lidded pan along with off the juices. Place the stuffing into a covered casserole dish. Refrigerate everything overnight, with the turkey meat sitting in its own drippings. Season the drippings if needed with salt and a bit of sage. That juice will absorb back into the meat, even if it was accidentally over-cooked. When all is reheated to 140' F. in the oven, the meat will be very, very juicy, and full flavored from sitting it the broth overnight. Arrange it all attractively on a serving platter and make gravy from the drippings.

This method gives you a little wiggle room if the turkey is just a bit under, or overcooked. Your turkey will be perfect.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the Nort
My wife asked me last night if we could roast the turkey the day before as we are trying to make things as easy as possible.
I told her I did not think it was a good idea.
You may just have given me enough confidence to try it.
Thanks Chief!

Oh.... I use the turkey drippings and stock for gravy. I will not have any drippings if i pour it over the meat. What do you do?
I use a separator and use the turkey grease for the rou. So, I'm afraid my gravy could suffer should i try this?
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Old 11-21-2015, 01:15 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
My wife asked me last night if we could roast the turkey the day before as we are trying to make things as easy as possible.
I told her I did not think it was a good idea.
You may just have given me enough confidence to try it.
Thanks Chief!

Oh.... I use the turkey drippings and stock for gravy. I will not have any drippings if i pour it over the meat. What do you do?
I use a separator and use the turkey grease for the rou. So, I'm afraid my gravy could suffer should i try this?
Michael Ruhlman describes the same technique, as well as an interesting method for braising the dark meat so all parts finish without overcooking: http://blog.ruhlman.com/2015/11/ruhl...aise-turkey-2/

Make your stock in advance with turkey parts, and save the fat and drippings from that for the gravy. There's a link on the page for that.
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Old 11-21-2015, 01:35 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Michael Ruhlman describes the same technique, as well as an interesting method for braising the dark meat so all parts finish without overcooking: Ruhlman Classic Roast-Braise Turkey | Michael Ruhlman

Make your stock in advance with turkey parts, and save the fat and drippings from that for the gravy. There's a link on the page for that.
#1. Thanks for the link, GG - does that turkey every look good.

RB, I make 'make ahead gravy' every year by spending a few extra bucks and using turkey parts. It's well worth it when Thanksgiving is over and everyone still wants gravy for hot turkey sandwiches, the leftover mashed potatoes, etc., and the gravy has been long gone.

It's time consuming, but it's not like you have to slave over a hot stove - most of the time the turkey parts and veggies are roasting, or the stock is simmering. You could also cut corners and use canned broth for part of the stock. Here's another couple of recipes - something to think about while you still have time.

Chef John's method sounds really good, but I would probably use at least 3 wings rather than 2, and not add quite so much water.

Chef John's Make-Ahead Turkey Gravy Recipe - Allrecipes.com

Make Ahead Turkey Gravy Recipe - Food.com
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Old 11-21-2015, 03:37 PM   #56
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Cook's Country/ATK had a show on today about roasting turkeys. Interestingly enough, they advocated breast down cooking for part of the roasting time so that the dark meat got done but the breast didn't overcook. Didn't get to watch the whole show because I had to be somewhere but did see the rack they were using to suspend the turkey and make it easy to flip. https://www.cookscountry.com/product...te-turkey-rack
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Old 11-22-2015, 12:30 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
My wife asked me last night if we could roast the turkey the day before as we are trying to make things as easy as possible.
I told her I did not think it was a good idea.
You may just have given me enough confidence to try it.
Thanks Chief!

Oh.... I use the turkey drippings and stock for gravy. I will not have any drippings if i pour it over the meat. What do you do?
I use a separator and use the turkey grease for the rou. So, I'm afraid my gravy could suffer should i try this?
After reheating, simply remove the carved turkey to the platter and pour off the pan juices to make your gravy. If you want, you can remove hardened fat before reheating to make separation easier. It will work beautifully for you. Give it a try.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 11-22-2015, 12:07 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
After reheating, simply remove the carved turkey to the platter and pour off the pan juices to make your gravy. If you want, you can remove hardened fat before reheating to make separation easier. It will work beautifully for you. Give it a try.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Thanks Chief. I'm certain we can get a good gravy as my turkey stock will be highly fortified.
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