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Old 10-17-2006, 01:34 PM   #11
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don't wash off cut up chicken anymore unless I see an exhorbitant amount of debris as anything will be killed when cooked -

Nope, not necessarily. Bacteria can produce an exotoxin that is not inactivated by heat. I think Salmonella may be one of them. Shigella is definitely one that is not inactivated.
Could have been what caused your discomfort.
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Old 10-17-2006, 01:42 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
don't wash off cut up chicken anymore unless I see an exhorbitant amount of debris as anything will be killed when cooked -

Nope, not necessarily. Bacteria can produce an exotoxin that is not inactivated by heat. I think Salmonella may be one of them. Shigella is definitely one that is not inactivated.
Could have been what caused your discomfort.
Salmonella is killed instantly at 160F. I don't know about shigella. Washing chicken is no guarantee of eliminating bacteria present on the chicken. You may be simply spreading it all over the meat. I believe that's why the USDA recommends against it.
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Old 10-17-2006, 01:51 PM   #13
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Yes that is exactly why the USDA recommends against it.

Also, washing the chicken with just water will not get rid of bacteria. It will just make it wet. Soap can kill bacteria, but I doubt anyone wants to lather up their chicken.
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Old 10-17-2006, 01:52 PM   #14
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If salmonella weren't killed by heat we'd all be I believe! What I've just read on the shigella is it's more of a "handler" transported illness but so far nothing about the cooking process. I'll have to look later.
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Old 10-17-2006, 01:55 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Yes that is exactly why the USDA recommends against it.

Also, washing the chicken with just water will not get rid of bacteria. It will just make it wet. Soap can kill bacteria, but I doubt anyone wants to lather up their chicken.
GB - should be invent edible soap like the edible body paint???

What about a 10% chlorax solution - I use that on my cutting board - if rinsed thoroughly wouldn't that help?
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Old 10-17-2006, 01:57 PM   #16
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GB - should be invent edible soap like the edible body paint???

What about a 10% chlorax solution - I use that on my cutting board - if rinsed thoroughly wouldn't that help?
...or you could just cook it.

Just say, "No!" to chicken seviche.
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Old 10-17-2006, 02:06 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Just say, "No!" to chicken seviche.
Wait - now we're back to the lemon thing! Full circle we've come!!!

I will no longer wash my chicken (spreading can be worse); I will cook thoroughly; I will never make chicken seviche again - THANKS Andy M - now I have to re-think dinner tonight!
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Old 10-17-2006, 02:07 PM   #18
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Andy you take the fun out of everything
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Old 10-17-2006, 02:36 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Yes that is exactly why the USDA recommends against it.

Also, washing the chicken with just water will not get rid of bacteria. It will just make it wet. Soap can kill bacteria, but I doubt anyone wants to lather up their chicken.
no..but my MIL uses soap
on her veggies and gets a little upset
when I won't. I do all my food prep before she
gets here now..sigh.
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Old 10-17-2006, 03:18 PM   #20
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I misspoke--and was mistaken about the Salmonella. It is staphylococcus toxin that is heat stable.

However, for me, I will continue to wash my chicken and cook it well. The basically fecal pools that suffice for washing chicken in processing plants should make me give it up, but I can't. I like it too much.


Staphylococcus aureus
Man's respiratory passages, skin and superficial wounds are common sources of S. aureus. When S. aureus is allowed to grow in foods, it can produce a toxin that causes illness. Although cooking destroys the bacteria, the toxin produced is heat stable and may not be destroyed. Staphylococcal food poisoning occurs most often in foods that require hand preparation, such as potato salad, ham salad and sandwich spreads. Sometimes these types of foods are left at room temperature for long periods of time, allowing the bacteria to grow and produce toxin. Good personal hygiene while handling foods will help keep S. aureus out of foods, and refrigeration of raw and cooked foods will prevent the growth of these bacteria if any are present.
Salmonella The gastrointestinal tracts of animals and man are common sources of Salmonella. High protein foods such as meat, poultry, fish and eggs are most commonly associated with Salmonella. However, any food that becomes contaminated and is then held at improper temperatures can cause salmonellosis. Salmonella are destroyed at cooking temperatures above 150 degrees F. The major causes of salmonellosis are contamination of cooked foods and insufficient cooking. contamination of cooked foods occurs from contact with surfaces or utensils that were not properly washed after use with raw products. If Salmonella is present on raw or cooked foods, its growth can be controlled by refrigeration below 40 degrees F.
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