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Old 08-27-2006, 04:23 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecactuswill
How do you take it from gelatin to stock?
Just drop it into the pot...it will revert back to liquid.
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Old 08-27-2006, 06:45 PM   #22
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When I boil (slowly simmer, actually) a chicken, I always put onion, celery, parsley and garlic in it from the start. Basically, I'm doing the same thing as Alan, but cutting out one step.
I then strain the broth before I refrigerate it. Once it's chilled (the next day), if I'm not going to use it right away, I skim the fat off the top and freeze the jelled broth for later.
I have found that if I boil the strained broth until it is reduced by half, the flavor is superior to anything one can get in a can.

*Note to Alan...when we get old and stove up, we tend to compromise. Your method is excellent.
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Old 08-27-2006, 09:48 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecactuswill
But I carefully remove all skin and trim all fat from chicken pieces, and the gelatin still forms?
If you're making stock from the bones (highly highly recommended), make sure you save the skin for the stock as well. Skin has the highest concentration of collagen (gelatin) than any other part of the bird. Bones are good for stock, but skin is stockmaking gold.
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Old 08-28-2006, 04:09 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scott123
If you're making stock from the bones (highly highly recommended), make sure you save the skin for the stock as well. Skin has the highest concentration of collagen (gelatin) than any other part of the bird. Bones are good for stock, but skin is stockmaking gold.
Too much fat. Skin has to go.
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Old 08-28-2006, 06:19 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecactuswill
Too much fat. Skin has to go.

But as it cools and settles fat is easily separated from the jelly which is just good and healthy, so the fat in the skin is not a promblem in the stock....just remove it when the stuff is congealed!
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Old 08-28-2006, 07:35 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
The gelatin has nothing to do with fat!

It comes from the bones and connective tissue in the chicken.
I agree, whenever I roast a chicken or parts (on a rack), I pour the gelatin in a container and freeze it. I just keep adding to it whenever I do chicken (which is often). I use it in gravies, soups, sauces etc. adds excellant flavor !
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Old 08-28-2006, 09:35 AM   #27
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You're giving up a lot of benefits if you toss the skin.

After you make the stock and chill it, the fat rises to the top and solidifies. Then you can just lift off the stock in large pieces and toss it.
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