"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-11-2006, 07:34 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 18
Unhappy What is Chicken Stock?

Hello everyone. I am new to this board and to cooking in general. I am making some fondue tomorrow night and the recipe calls for chicken stock. I looked down the cooking isle and the soup isle at the store and couldn't find it! What is it and where can I get it? Are there any substitutes in case I still can't find it? Thanks for your help.

__________________

__________________
CommMajor101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2006, 07:49 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
texasgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Texas
Posts: 9,497
You can use chicken broth. You can find it in the soup isle.
__________________

__________________
texasgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2006, 07:55 PM   #3
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Like Texasgirl said, you can use chicken broth. Broth and stock are now used interchangeably. Every grocery store will carry broth. It is usually in the soup isle and will probably come in chicken, beef, and vegetable. Swanson is a popular brand. If you don't see it then ask someone who works there. They will definitely carry it.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2006, 09:48 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
auntdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,418
I love to make stock and do it frequently (one advantage is that it makes the house smell so wonderful). And technically there is a difference between stocks and broths, but as GB said the differences today have become very muddied. In fact we often vary our recipes, most stock making here is done by the seat of our pants, and whether what we have made is a stock or a broth is often not clear. But who cares if it tastes good!

The chicken broth that you can buy in any supermarket generally works just fine. You can find the low salt version and, depending upon what you are making, you might want to use that instead. Generally we just go with the regular chicken broth, unless the dish is already salty.

I have some problems with most canned beef broths. They have a very high salt content and, therefore, usually prefer not to use them. When I need to, will cut them with low salt chicken stock, sorry broth, and find the results usually acceptable.

There are also bouillon cubes, granules, and bases. You add the stuff to water and, voila, instant broth. The products contain a lot of salt and the taste varies significantly between products. However, there are some bases that are pretty good. You can find lobster bases, ham bases, chicken, beef, a fairly extensive variety of them. But you usually have to buy a tub of the stuff and they are not carried in most supermarkets. The brands vary in quality and are primarily used by professional cooks, but they are available to the home cook and are easily found on the web.

Sorry I went on so long, but I do love stocks/broths.

They form the basis of many dishes and if the base is poor, the final dish will be also.

But canned chicken stock usually works very well.

Enjoy.
__________________
auntdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2006, 09:54 PM   #5
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
To answer your question a little further, stock is a liquid that is made by boiling animal bones. Usually vegetables are added for flavor as well. There is gelatin in the bones that when cooked makes a wonderful stock that gives you that lip smacking feel. Broth is basically the same thing, but instead of bones (and the lip smacking gelatin) you would use meat for flavor. They are not the same thing, but can usually be used interchangeably without a significant difference.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2006, 10:19 PM   #6
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 18
Thank you!

You guys rock! Those were all very helpful and much appreciated for the speedy replies! Thank you times 10!
__________________
CommMajor101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2006, 10:20 PM   #7
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
You are very welcome and by the way... Welcome to DC
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2006, 09:22 AM   #8
Master Chef
 
texasgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Texas
Posts: 9,497
Your welcome!!
__________________
texasgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2006, 09:55 AM   #9
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,764
Send a message via MSN to urmaniac13 Send a message via Skype™ to urmaniac13
those buillon cubes and granules are handy options, but as auntdot said, they can be very salty. Many of them are made with msg and its flavour is a bit overpowering, and make it saltier. Try and see if you can find a msg free version. IMO they taste much better...
__________________
urmaniac13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2006, 03:02 PM   #10
Head Chef
 
Yakuta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,208
Since GB explained the difference I will say one more thing. If you ever have some time on your hands you can make this at home. I like mine to be an inbetween broth and stock so I use a whole cut up skinned chicken with bones to make mine. The recipe is simple. If you have time try it as it's much much better than the canned variety.

1 whole chicken cut up and skinned
2 large cloves of garlic roughly chopped
1/2 stick of ginger (cut into cubes)
2 carrots cut up into rough chunks
1 large onion peeled and again chop into large chunks
I don't like celery in mine as it's too strong
6-8 cups of water

Bring this all to a boil. Reduce, cover and continue to let it simmer for 30 minutes or so. Then shut the stove and let it cool a bit. Remove the peices of the chicken with tongs and strain the soup mixture. Pour in containers and freeze.

The chicken can be shredded and used in fried rice, soups, enchilada's or any other thing you wish to use it in. The soup (combination of stock and broth) can be used in countless recipes.

One chicken makes a fairly decent batch of soup base.
__________________

__________________
Yakuta is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:09 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.