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View Poll Results: What kind of Turkey did you buy?
Fresh - I'll brine it myself 3 14.29%
Fresh - I'll butter/oil it myself 2 9.52%
Fresh Kosher Pre-Brined 0 0%
Fresh or Frozen Organic or Free-Range 2 9.52%
Frozen Inexpensive - Self-basting 4 19.05%
Frozen Young Turkey 9 42.86%
Butterball 1 4.76%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 21. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-20-2010, 07:28 AM   #11
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Zhizara, I think the brining makes the meat more tender.

Bakechef, thank you for that clarification. I'm not positive now but I thought it was kosher brined. I would assume Kosher Turkey means using Kosher Salt. I'm confused. If it's not Kosher brined then what makes the turkey kosher?

One more thing: Doesn't salt draw out the moisture from meat? Thus brining would make it less juicy?
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Old 11-20-2010, 09:09 AM   #12
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I buy a fresh turkey from a local farm...killed the day before...I make an herb butter and rub in under the skin, I salt and pepper the outside and cavity, I put in some aromatics, I lay root veg in my pan and put the bird on top of them and roast. Delish.
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Old 11-20-2010, 09:49 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mollyanne View Post
Zhizara, I think the brining makes the meat more tender.

Bakechef, thank you for that clarification. I'm not positive now but I thought it was kosher brined. I would assume Kosher Turkey means using Kosher Salt. I'm confused. If it's not Kosher brined then what makes the turkey kosher?

One more thing: Doesn't salt draw out the moisture from meat? Thus brining would make it less juicy?
That's what I thought too.

Here's a hilarious thought for the day. Imagine me in my 7X8 kitchen with sink or some kind of container of brine, and a big, awkward, wet, slippery bird. Just the thought of that bird ricocheting around gave me a belly laugh.
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Old 11-20-2010, 10:07 AM   #14
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I'm not buying a turkey this year since my dad is hosting and he got a smoked turkey which is not on your list for voting. He really enjoys the smoked turkey so he ordered it about 2 months ago! If I'm buying, I get the biggest cheapest frozen turkey I can. I don't brine or oil. No one complains and there are little leftovers.
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Old 11-20-2010, 10:25 AM   #15
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Kosher/ Kashrut certification is needed by the Abattoir sell the meat as Kosher, here the turkey would have a metal seal on it. I think that all salt is Kosher so it must be called kosher for some other reason.
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Old 11-20-2010, 10:29 AM   #16
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If we buy a Turkey it will be a bronze feather which is a cross between a standard white and a black turkey that is supposed to have originated from your wild bird.
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Old 11-20-2010, 10:31 AM   #17
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A dead one.
Selkie mate where is your spirit of adventure.
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Old 11-20-2010, 10:36 AM   #18
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I usually buy the cheapest one I can find. Preferably a fresh one. That just means a turkey that the store has mostly thawed out. I have bought several "fresh" turkeys that were still frozen in the center. They are more convenient.
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Old 11-20-2010, 10:49 AM   #19
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Brining adds moisture and flavor to a turkey. Cooking a brined turkey you will not have dry breast meat unless you seriously overcook it.

During brining the moisture in the turkey is less salty than the brine so there is an exchange of moisture between the turkey and the brine to equalize the saltiness. This process draws the salted and flavored brine into the turkey resulting in a nicely flavored and moist bird.

I don't consider it a lot of work. My effort in total is no more than 20 minutes or so to prepare the brine and chill it then to drop the bird into the brine the night before and take it out and rinse it Thursday morning.

To insure a moist bird, I don't stuff the turkey but make stuffing and bake it separately.

I use Alton Brown's Thanksgiving Turkey recipe for brining and roasting. I've never had a bad result.
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Old 11-20-2010, 10:56 AM   #20
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That's good info...thank you. Also, William Sonoma has a recipe for Dry Brining. Just when you thought it couldn't get more confusing, I have to throw Dry Brining into the mix here Has anyone tried that?
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