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View Poll Results: What kind of Turkey did you buy?
Fresh - I'll brine it myself 3 14.29%
Fresh - I'll butter/oil it myself 2 9.52%
Fresh Kosher Pre-Brined 0 0%
Fresh or Frozen Organic or Free-Range 2 9.52%
Frozen Inexpensive - Self-basting 4 19.05%
Frozen Young Turkey 9 42.86%
Butterball 1 4.76%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 21. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-20-2010, 03:50 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Brining adds moisture and flavor to a turkey. Cooking a brined turkey you will not have dry breast meat unless you seriously overcook it.

During brining the moisture in the turkey is less salty than the brine so there is an exchange of moisture between the turkey and the brine to equalize the saltiness. This process draws the salted and flavored brine into the turkey resulting in a nicely flavored and moist bird.

I don't consider it a lot of work. My effort in total is no more than 20 minutes or so to prepare the brine and chill it then to drop the bird into the brine the night before and take it out and rinse it Thursday morning.

To insure a moist bird, I don't stuff the turkey but make stuffing and bake it separately.

I use Alton Brown's Thanksgiving Turkey recipe for brining and roasting. I've never had a bad result.
Not to be argumentative, Andy, but when referring to brining, that term "adds flavor" really gets me. The brine is basically salty water and a few spices, which you can add during cooking. How can adding salt, add flavor? The flavor is already there. Salt just makes the mouth water which makes one perceive that there is more flavor. If you salted the bird with the same amount of sodium it picks up from brining, you would have the same thing. Brining also makes it harder to achieve crispy skin which is something I love, so, no brining for me.

We are told not to salt our beef before cooking because it draws the moisure out of the meat. Wouldn't a salty brine do the same thing to the bird? My sister in law swears by brining. She can keep her bird..lol!
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Old 11-20-2010, 04:04 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
Not to be argumentative, Andy, but when referring to brining, that term "adds flavor" really gets me. The brine is basically salty water and a few spices, which you can add during cooking. How can adding salt, add flavor? The flavor is already there. Salt just makes the mouth water which makes one perceive that there is more flavor. If you salted the bird with the same amount of sodium it picks up from brining, you would have the same thing. Brining also makes it harder to achieve crispy skin which is something I love, so, no brining for me.

We are told not to salt our beef before cooking because it draws the moisure out of the meat. Wouldn't a salty brine do the same thing to the bird? My sister in law swears by brining. She can keep her bird..lol!

Rocky,

I use this recipe for brining and roasting my turkey. As you can see, a brine is not limited to salt so flavor is not limited to saltiness.
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Old 11-20-2010, 05:09 PM   #33
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Rocky,

I use this recipe for brining and roasting my turkey. As you can see, a brine is not limited to salt so flavor is not limited to saltiness.
That's the one I have been using for a few years. It is really good. People really rave about my turkey, saying that it is the best that they have ever had.

I always have crispy skin even when brining, I bake according to Alton's directions with great results.

I usually buy whatever frozen bird is the cheapest!
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Old 11-20-2010, 09:05 PM   #34
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i got the best one of all. FREE. it is a young turkey about 12 pounds. don't know if it is injected or not. will have to check. gonna do a beer butt turkey with bacon. saw guy feri do on big bite. although he did to chicken , am sure it will work. just a bit different, and fun.
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Old 11-21-2010, 03:16 AM   #35
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Rocky,

I use this recipe for brining and roasting my turkey. As you can see, a brine is not limited to salt so flavor is not limited to saltiness.
Good looking recipe. I'll have to give it a try sometime. Thanks..
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Old 11-21-2010, 11:21 AM   #36
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Kosher/ Kashrut certification is needed by the Abattoir sell the meat as Kosher, here the turkey would have a metal seal on it. I think that all salt is Kosher so it must be called kosher for some other reason.
I think we've had more than one conversation about "kosher" salt here that went on for pages.

And yes, all salts are in fact kosher, but if there is no rabinical supervision then the salt (any product) cannot be sold as kosher. The only reason the "kosher" salt is called kosher is because the large grain salt is used in kashering of the meat process so that is why it is called kosher.

As far as turkey. I bought Kosher turkey last year, and did not get to use it. So I guess I better use it this year. It is not brained per say. However it was salted and then it was washed.
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Old 11-21-2010, 12:45 PM   #37
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A few weeks ago I bought 5 freshly butchered back yard raised chickens, which I refrigerated for a day before I froze them. I will brine, and then roast an 8 pound chicken on Thursday.
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Old 11-21-2010, 05:24 PM   #38
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i got the best one of all. FREE. it is a young turkey about 12 pounds. don't know if it is injected or not. will have to check. gonna do a beer butt turkey with bacon. saw guy feri do on big bite. although he did to chicken , am sure it will work. just a bit different, and fun.

checked and it has been injected. i am not suppose to have much salt. oh well.
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Old 11-21-2010, 05:49 PM   #39
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Salt

I have brined and not brined and can't say I can tell any difference when baking/roasting a turkey. I think if you roast with plenty of moisture, your turkey isn't going to be dry anyway. I suspect if you were going to smoke a turkey (cook low, slow and LONG) then every bit of moisture you can get in the turkey would count.

Someone posted about salt drawing moisture out---- salt draws moisture to it. That is if you put salt water inside the meat, it will draw more water to it. That's why brining works... But for the typical 3-4 hour turkey roast, I'm a big fan of 1) stuffing my turkey with pieces of fresh onion, celery, apple, garlic, carrot & parsnips, (and putting more around and under my bird) and 2) cooking it covered for roughly 2/3 of the cooking time... Plenty of moisture every time.

Oh, and I'll vote for a fresh bird over frozen every time.
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Old 11-21-2010, 05:52 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by bethzaring View Post
A few weeks ago I bought 5 freshly butchered back yard raised chickens, which I refrigerated for a day before I froze them. I will brine, and then roast an 8 pound chicken on Thursday.
How I would love to have some fresh back yard chickens Beth!! One of my best childhood memories is my Grandma's roast chicken from her yard. I've never had anything like it since. WOW........an 8 lb. roast chicken sounds wonderful !
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