"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
View Poll Results: What kind of Turkey did you buy?
Fresh - I'll brine it myself 3 14.29%
Fresh - I'll butter/oil it myself 2 9.52%
Fresh Kosher Pre-Brined 0 0%
Fresh or Frozen Organic or Free-Range 2 9.52%
Frozen Inexpensive - Self-basting 4 19.05%
Frozen Young Turkey 9 42.86%
Butterball 1 4.76%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 21. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-20-2010, 04:01 AM   #1
Flour Child
 
mollyanne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 1,406
What Turkey Type Are You Buying

Trader Joe's is selling "Fresh Brined Turkeys". How can that be when the brining process is only suppose to be going on for 24 hours?

I didn't think to ask them that while I was there. I was too busy asking them why there was a separate section for Kosher Salt Brined and another section for Sea Salt Brined. She said that Kosher Salt seeps into the meat better.

Then I had to google what the big diff is between Kosher Salt and Sea Salt...then I got even more confused. Sea Salt comes from the sea only (duh) and Kosher comes from either mines or sea and can be approved by Jewish priests or not. Table Salt comes only from underground mines and can be iodinized or not.

Some said it's all about texture as some prefer crunchy chunks and cooks can pinch it easier. Others say there is a taste difference but not after it's been heated.

I walked away turkeyless mostly because I didn't want it to be over-brined...is that possible?

Eek...I must make my decision today as time is running out.

__________________

__________________


. My kitchen is for dancing. Bring me sunshine in a cup~emily dickinson. Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
mollyanne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2010, 05:15 AM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Zhizara's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 12,537
Brining seems to be the latest "thing" I can't imagine going to that much trouble and the chance of ruining my food with too much salt makes me cringe.

I'll stick to TNT roast turkey.
__________________

__________________

If you can't see the bright side of life, polish the dull side.
Zhizara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2010, 05:20 AM   #3
Flour Child
 
mollyanne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 1,406
I was thinking the same thing, Zhizara...brining is like a fad this year. It's the first time I've heard of it
__________________


. My kitchen is for dancing. Bring me sunshine in a cup~emily dickinson. Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
mollyanne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2010, 06:26 AM   #4
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
I hate to say it, but I buy the cheapest frozen 20 pound turkey I can find in the grocery store. As my mother did. It has never failed me. I have, over the years, had many people sit at my table, from many walks of life and other cultures. All have chowed down like the famine was going to start tomorrow. If the breast is a little dry, well, that's why God invented gravy. I keep saying I'm going, some day, to brine a fresh turkey, but in my world, experimentation isn't for big holiday meals.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2010, 07:09 AM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Selkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 3,796
A dead one.
__________________
"Food is our common ground, a universal experience." - James Beard
Selkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2010, 07:10 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Zhizara's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 12,537
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire View Post
I hate to say it, but I buy the cheapest frozen 20 pound turkey I can find in the grocery store. As my mother did. It has never failed me. I have, over the years, had many people sit at my table, from many walks of life and other cultures. All have chowed down like the famine was going to start tomorrow. If the breast is a little dry, well, that's why God invented gravy. I keep saying I'm going, some day, to brine a fresh turkey, but in my world, experimentation isn't for big holiday meals.
You said it all. I've been thinking about this while puttering around this morning, and I couldn't think of ever having a problem with turkey. I agree, it's no time to experiment. I just can't imagine ever going to so much trouble (just think of the logistics) with a huge bird that might or might not make a small improvement. By my way of thinking, why would I want my turkey to soak up a bunch of salt. Yeeech.

Thank you both for the backup. I'm glad I'm not alone on this one.
__________________

If you can't see the bright side of life, polish the dull side.
Zhizara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2010, 07:14 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
bakechef's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 4,084
I have been brining for years. Food network chefs have been brining for many years, so it isn't a new fad.

If the brine is the right salinity it can be brined for quite a while. The TJ's Turkey was probably brined, rinsed and packaged.

In grocery stores their rotisserie chicken comes to the store in a brine and has an uncooked shelf life of 10-15 days. They aren't overly salty to most, but it does make the meat softer.
__________________
bakechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2010, 07:15 AM   #8
Executive Chef
 
bakechef's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 4,084
In my TJ's there was a section for "brined" and a section for "Kosher" I believe that it was a Kosher certified turkey, not a Kosher salt brined turkey, at least in my store.
__________________
bakechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2010, 07:16 AM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Zhizara's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 12,537
While we're on the subject, deep fried turkey is another story. A group of us who had no special place to go on holidays, always met up for a party on holidays. A couple of times, DFT was made with a bunch of guys standing around helping each other do it right. It was especially good eating, but unless there are a lot of people and more than one turkey, I can't see it.

I can't imagine not having drippings for my gravy.
__________________

If you can't see the bright side of life, polish the dull side.
Zhizara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2010, 07:17 AM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Zhizara's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 12,537
What are the benefits of brining that would justify so much work?
__________________

__________________

If you can't see the bright side of life, polish the dull side.
Zhizara is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.