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Old 10-20-2004, 09:29 AM   #11
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I found this in my Zebco Fish & Wild Game cookbook. I have not tried it but it looks pretty good.

Venison Roast in Beer

1 venison ham, deboned*
1 large onion, sliced
1/2C. ketchup
2Tbsp. brown sugar
1 clove garlic, minced
1 can beer

*Note: Almost any wild game can be used.
On a doubled piece of heavy duty foil, place the ham & slices of onion. Mix ketchup, brown sugar, garlic, & beer. This has no salt, so add salt only if you wish. Shape foil so sides will hold in liquid. Add sauce & wrap meat very securely. Bake at least 6 hours at 250F. Slice meat across grain & serve hot with thickened sauce or serve cold for sandwiches. When cold this is just as good as deli roast beef.
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Old 10-20-2004, 09:31 AM   #12
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thanks, crewsk. I've heard that soaking venison in milk will take some of the wild taste out. Is this true, anyone?
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Old 10-20-2004, 09:36 AM   #13
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Well since you said anyone I'll answer. Yes it does work. Buttermilk works, IMO, works better than regular milk, but they both do a good job. Plus it tenderizes the meat some.

I hope Lifter gets here soon with more ideas for you mudbug. I really think Lifter is more of an expert on this subject than I am! I'd love some of his ideas as well.
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Old 10-20-2004, 07:52 PM   #14
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Paging Mr. Lifter!!
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Old 10-21-2004, 11:45 PM   #15
 
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Sorry to be late Mudbug...

The important thing(s) with game are to cut it off the bones, and to eliminate any and all "fat", plus, of course, to hang it for as long as possible...14 days is the absolute minimum, 21 days would be a lot better....

Coming up to cooking it, I'd go the marinading route, probably (today) with a teriyaki or garlic herb mix, adding a good deal more oil to the mix, as you have depleted the fats...and marinate it longer than you would beef or pork...this is wild meat and it's going to be tougher...

Bacon fats or a shell of pork rind around it, do NOT be afraid to baste it, or put a separate container of water in the oven for a "steaming" effect", and ABSOLUTELY cook this no more than "medium rare" on a digital probe, and don't count on a usable gravy....

A red wine (medium sweet?) in the marinade, and/or with dinner, avoid over-browning of the meat (it dries up terribly quickly!) at all costs...

Of course if you don't like this prospect, use at least some of it, and segue on to the "Stews" section of the Board, and look in on Audeo's posts with mine on "Chili", and grind the marinated meat coarsely and make some variant of the right hand extreme as she suggests from the 1800's or the left wing Canadian version that I posted, and try to enjoy it...

The animal that involuntarily donated the roast would take this as the "final compliment" on how it tried to live its life...

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Old 10-22-2004, 12:06 AM   #16
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When I was about 12 years old, my dad made some boiled dinner with venison. It was very tasty. But my eyes were bigger than my stomach, as the saying goes. I couldn't finish my bowl-full. I had been dipping bread into the bowl and enjoying myself. I wanted to let the food in my stomach digest some so I set the bowl to the side and promised to come back later. Now you have to remember that this was before microwave ovens were first made available to the public.

To make a long story short, the food got cold. I removed the bread from the bowl, not paying much attention to what I was doing, and took a bite. It was like biting into a candle. The venison tallow had hardened.

For those who don't know, venison fat was rendered to give early settlers, and native americans, wax for candles and fuel. It was easily stored. The tallow-wax, when burned, is rather smokey.

As Lifter said, the venison fat must be removed before cooking the meat to help remove the wild flavor, and to get rid of the tallow.

Personally, I like the wild flavor.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North :D
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Old 10-22-2004, 02:34 AM   #17
 
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Ergo sum, quid pluribus...

And I mentioned to marinate it well, put some olive oil into it, etc...?

Am being borne out here, I expect...

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Old 10-22-2004, 08:21 AM   #18
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Thanks for the additional instructions, Lifter. You were not late (I'm in no hurry); I suspect we keep different hours. A question and a comment:

My venison roast is frozen, so do I hang it anyway, after it's thawed? Hanging surely is only for freshly killed animals?

The guy who gave us the roast also gave us several sleeves of ground venison, which we have used to make chili with good results. Still have some of that too, so I will try one or other of the chili recipes you and Audeo have kindly provided.
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Old 10-22-2004, 10:18 PM   #19
 
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No, 'Bug, you don't hang it after its thawed...it will (hopefully!) have been hung some time before it was butchered. You might add a bit of age to it by defrosting it very slowly, in the fridge, perhaps in a plastic bag, with some marinade?

Let us all know which method(s) you follow, and what you thought of the results!

PS
If using ground venison for chili, if they haven't added pork fat, do so when you cook it up, otherwise it'll be very dry and tough

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Old 10-22-2004, 10:57 PM   #20
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hey lifter, just read your complaint, sorry, just having fun. relax dude.

to stay on topic, i always soak wild game and fishes, (except buffalo because it's not really wild, it's farm raised on the same stuff as cows) in buttermilk to remove some of the gaminess. this is especially effective with bluefish and shark. i can't stomach that gamey taste in bluefish unless it has been soaked, then grilled over a smokey hardwood fire.
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