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Old 08-07-2009, 12:48 PM   #31
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A picture is a thousand words or so they say, take any number of caned foods and just plop them on a paper plate and they are a real turn off. Take spaghetti-o, open a can and pour some on a paper plate, one look and you would never give them a second chance. Heat them up and served them in a bowl and what a difference. Not that I would eat them in the first place, just don't like them. You take potted meat spread them on a cracker with a piece of cheese, then arrange them on a platter, they look totally different and editable. Another example is canned corn beef, just dumped on a plate it looks like dog food, made into paddies and fried with eggs in the morning now that is an entirely different story.
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Old 08-07-2009, 12:49 PM   #32
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I have never tried potted meat, but I love Vienna sausages, although I haven't bought any in years. And I keep Spam Lite on the shelf all the time. But as mentioned above, that's pork shoulder.
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Old 08-07-2009, 03:46 PM   #33
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i've loved potted meat since i was a kiddo! it's good, & i love it with wht. bread, actual mayo, lettuce, pepper; not as yummy as 140-calorie-from-fat-per-serving braunswieger though!
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Old 08-08-2009, 09:24 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Armour Star: Mechanically separated chicken, beef tripe, partially defatted cooked beef fatty tissue, beef hearts, water, partially defatted cooked pork fatty tissue, salt, and less than 2 percent: mustard, natural flavorings, dried garlic, dextrose, sodium erythorbate, and sodium nitrite.

Are you kidding me!?!?


Hmmm, let me see, mechanically separated chicken; chicken that's been forced through a seive to remove the bones. Innards were removed first of course.

Beef fatty tissue, the marble part of well-marbled beef, also suet, which is used in various dishes throughout the British Isles, but in potted meat, some of the fat is removed.

Beef hearts - a rich, well flavored muscle that is underutilyzed in the U.S., but deliscious just the same.

Pork fatty tissue - bacon, side pork, ham hocks, etc., but again, with some of the fat removed.

Sodium erythorbate and sodium nitrate, both are preservatives found in virtually every deli meat ever created, as well as in all cured sausages, and most ham. The sodium nitrate inhibits the growth of the organism that excretes the botulism toxin, but in too large amounts, has been liked to cancer. The Sodium erythorbate keeps the sodium nitrate from combining with oxygen, enhancing its staining ability (keeps the meat pink in delli foods), and also negates the breakdown of the sodium nitrate into cancer-causing substances when metabolized in the body. It also is a powerful anti-oxident. It is extrated from sugars from primarily sugar beets.

Beef tripe - a relatively bland tasting tissue made of cartillage, that stuff that connects your muscles to your bones, from which collagen (a very healthful cousin to protien) is extracted to make such products as Jello, and unflavored gellatine, and that is often found in Asian soups. That same type of tissue is found in all bones and is what adds a rich and luxurious texture to oxtail soup.

And so I ask again, what's so bad about the ingredients? Methinks that we are just not used to seeing such things and so are a bit skittish towards them. Me, I'm not the skittish type. Granted, I don't eat it often as it is high in both fat and sodium. But mixed together with some pickle relish and Miracle Whip, once in a while, it make a pretty tasty sandwich. As for the looks of it plopped onto a plate, plop a blob of ground bologna on a plate. It looks very similar, and the same ingredients are often added to it to turn it into a sandwich spread.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 08-08-2009, 09:44 AM   #35
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But Goodweed, you forgot the tastiest parts:

Pig tail, ears, snout, lips, testicles and uterus!
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Old 08-08-2009, 09:54 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arky View Post
But Goodweed, you forgot the tastiest parts:

Pig tail, ears, snout, lips, testicles and uterus!
Hmmm; didn't see any of those in the ingrediant list. In fact, didn't see anything that could be distantly related, and maybe disguised with another name that sugests any of those parts. Maybe you're confusing potted meat with Comerically made Mexican Chorizo.

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Old 08-08-2009, 10:21 AM   #37
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Arky, pig snout and ears are delicacies in some parts of the world. Thymus glands (sweetbreads) are also gourmet delights. I imagine uterus would be a bit chewy but testicles seem to be commonly eaten in the States, as far as I can see from Google.
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Old 08-08-2009, 10:28 AM   #38
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They are sometimes listed under an unobtrusive term such as "pork by-products" or "Variety Meats" or "Partially Defatted Cooked Pork/Beef Fatty Tissue", which I believe is listed in both the Hormel and Libby ingredient list.

I'm not passing judgment. I simply want to know exactly what it is that I'm eating. Believe me, I've eaten more than my fair share of Vienna Sausage and Slim Jims!
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Old 08-08-2009, 10:49 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
As for the looks of it plopped onto a plate, plop a blob of ground bologna on a plate. It looks very similar, and the same ingredients are often added to it to turn it into a sandwich spread.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
You had a decent argument until this part GW. Ground bologna sounds about as apetizing as...well I won't say it because it would be rude of me seeing that you enjoy this stuff.

We eat with our eyes as well as our mouths and my eyes scream in terror when they see this stuff.

For me, meat should never come from a can.
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Old 08-08-2009, 04:14 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
Hmmm, let me see, mechanically separated chicken; chicken that's been forced through a seive to remove the bones. Innards were removed first of course.

Beef fatty tissue, the marble part of well-marbled beef, also suet, which is used in various dishes throughout the British Isles, but in potted meat, some of the fat is removed.

Beef hearts - a rich, well flavored muscle that is underutilyzed in the U.S., but deliscious just the same.

Pork fatty tissue - bacon, side pork, ham hocks, etc., but again, with some of the fat removed.

Sodium erythorbate and sodium nitrate, both are preservatives found in virtually every deli meat ever created, as well as in all cured sausages, and most ham. The sodium nitrate inhibits the growth of the organism that excretes the botulism toxin, but in too large amounts, has been liked to cancer. The Sodium erythorbate keeps the sodium nitrate from combining with oxygen, enhancing its staining ability (keeps the meat pink in delli foods), and also negates the breakdown of the sodium nitrate into cancer-causing substances when metabolized in the body. It also is a powerful anti-oxident. It is extrated from sugars from primarily sugar beets.

Beef tripe - a relatively bland tasting tissue made of cartillage, that stuff that connects your muscles to your bones, from which collagen (a very healthful cousin to protien) is extracted to make such products as Jello, and unflavored gellatine, and that is often found in Asian soups. That same type of tissue is found in all bones and is what adds a rich and luxurious texture to oxtail soup.

And so I ask again, what's so bad about the ingredients? Methinks that we are just not used to seeing such things and so are a bit skittish towards them. Me, I'm not the skittish type. Granted, I don't eat it often as it is high in both fat and sodium. But mixed together with some pickle relish and Miracle Whip, once in a while, it make a pretty tasty sandwich. As for the looks of it plopped onto a plate, plop a blob of ground bologna on a plate. It looks very similar, and the same ingredients are often added to it to turn it into a sandwich spread.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
i'm with ya, weed, except tripe is cow stomach.
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