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Old 07-13-2012, 05:00 AM   #31
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Heroes, Submarines & Hoagies

To All Contributors On This Thread,

Buon Giorno,

Firstly, thanks for all the feedback ...

Secondly, it is obvious we are all born and bred in an enormous variety of places, near and far, and we should take a moment to remember, our varied cultures can be such a positive factor, when discussing the culinary arts, gastronomy, wines, restaurants and Chefs ...

Thanks.
Have a great wkend.
Ciao, Margaux Cintrano
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Old 07-13-2012, 07:34 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Zagut: thanks for your contribution.

Craig: I know that you are a native Floridian, however, where or what does NO stand for ?

I do agree with you that each local place has their own take on a specific dish or sandwich, in this case and different ingredients.

Eating a Hero in downtown NYC tastes different than eating one in Puglia, Italia.

Have nice wkend,
Ciao. Margi.
Margi, NO stands for New Orleans. As you know it is in Louisiana.
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Old 07-13-2012, 07:39 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Thanks for your feedback Addie,

Ciao,
Have nice wkend.
Margi.
As sick as I am on lobster, lobster salad is different. I think it is that the celery and mayo cut down the sweetnes of the lobster meat. Some places use celery salt. It is cheaper than adding fresh produce. I want the crunch of the celery. And I never use or buy salt anything spice. When you look at the ingredients, salt is always the first ingredient listed. I would much rather just buy the spice standing alone and add it as well as the salt to my own liking.
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Old 07-14-2012, 08:46 PM   #34
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A Philly cheese steak is good, but bake it in a pizza oven like they do in the other side of the state and call it a hoagie....then you'll have a great sandwich
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Old 07-15-2012, 12:35 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Has something to do with the OP's subject.
jpb. you've been away from nyc and a lawn guylander too long.

being a native ny'er that spends half of my waking hours in nyc, and now living in jersey (which is close to philly ),
if someone asked me to name the quintessential nyc hero, or a philly hoagie besides a cheesesteak, i couldn't do it.

there's so many choices and people's personal preferences, it's too open ended of a question to be answered in the op's context. almost anything can be put on bread and it be called a hero/hoagie. not to mention submarine sandwich or grinder.


now, if you said a nyc or philly italian style coldcut hero or hoagie, then it's a good question. you see, you have to actually live here to understand. research doesn't cut it.

anyway, in that context -

for nyc, it's ham and/or a salumi or two (coppa, cappocola, salami, soppressatta, pancetta, prosciutto, bresaola, mortadella, speck, etc.), a cheese or two (mozzarella, provolone, asiago, fontina, ricotta salata, parmesan, etc.), shredded lettuce, tomatoes, onions, roasted red peppers, oregano, and red wine vinegar and evoo.

i have no idea what kind of coldcuts they eat in philly that's any different than nyc, except maybe lebanon balogna.

besides, if i'm in philly, screw the cheesesteaks, i'm goin' for roast pork, broccoli rabe, and sharp provolone.
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Old 07-16-2012, 02:13 PM   #36
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I was born and raised (for the most part) in New York City (manhattan), lived & worked there, as well. (Lived on avenue I in brooklyn in my senior year.) Never had a sub/hero until I ate at a small Italian deli/market in so california - called Salerno's. (There's lots of history there, but it's a long story. I'll try to condense.) The line got so long in his tiny deli, he bought a larger store (same neighborhood -close to the studios in Burbank), and myself & all the regular patrons followed. With word-of-mouth, the place was so jammed at lunchtime, he employed a helper. It became a restaurant over time, & I read it was taken over in 2007. The menu is quite extensive, but nothing will compare to the original Salerno's, where he made the sandwiches himself His name is carried on, but it's now a cafe/restaurant, & very different from the days when he started making subs/heros for his son & son's friends. They caught on in a big way & the biz took off.)

What set his heros/subs apart, for me, were the fresh baked rolls, juicy ripe tomatoes, assorted deli from his shop, his own dressing (oil & red wine vinegar?), topped with a shaker of fresh-grated parmesan cheese. The tuna subs/heros were made with a whole can of imported tuna.

He later branched out to meatball, eggplant parm (my personal favorite), sausage & peppers, steak & peppers, & the list goes on.

.
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Old 07-16-2012, 02:23 PM   #37
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Cerise,

Thanks for sharing your lovely story with us. Truly enjoyed.

Expansion does tend to dampen the Italian Deli business ... Ruin it may I say ?

Good things always come in small packages they say...

Have a nice summer.
Margi. Ciao.
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Old 07-16-2012, 03:43 PM   #38
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It broke my heart to go to the website & see his deli/market had turned into an outdoor cafe, breafast burritos, sandwich wraps, and greek salads. Went to the "About Us" page, & no mention of Salerno, history etc. from the owner. Time marches on, I guess, & things change :( I don't think he could have ever imagined that his little grocery w/ italian meats would take off, as it did, & become a huge success. The quiet humble man who made sandwiches in his tiny deli, Salerno, will always be my Hero

Back then, Jonathan Winters would come in, and do a stand-up comedy routine (just being himself) for the studio, neighborhood folks, & patrons in line. Those were the days.

There are Subway chains, but they don't hold a candle to his subs. Back in 1965(?) there were subway seats & maps of the NYC subway transit. Nothing memorable. Admittedly, I take out from Subway now, it's more like fast food - not much quality (a slice of a slivered onion or tomato), but it's quick & sometimes will do in a pinch.
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Old 07-17-2012, 04:43 AM   #39
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Cerise, Buon Giorno,

Unfortunately, the loss of uncountable deli markets of family size businesses are or have gone out of business or their children and families have enlargened and modernized or re-engineered the businesses to go larger scale. This has been happening in numerous big cities, Madrid Capital for example.

Over in Puglia, where I am through August, there are uncountable small family deli grocers and it is so much fan, to explore the shelves, and showcase glass. I absolutely find the nooks and crannies, fab to explore ... The small talk, with the owners and the opportunity for language exchange, as Italian is my 2nd language ( paternal family ).

I have to say, I agree with you, and in big cities, many old timers have been bought by Immigrants from Asia, and things have changed, not to my personal liking.

However, in the villages and small towns, things in the Mediterranean hold The Fort, and for this, I am very pleased.

Your new Avatar is lovely, pretty woman.

Have nice day.
Ciao, Margaux.
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Old 07-19-2012, 04:32 PM   #40
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Philly. Hoagie. Spent part of my childhood living in the apartment over Pileggi's Grocery, 19th and Venango. City of Brotherly Love...
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