"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches > Yeast Breads, Rolls & Braids
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-31-2012, 04:06 PM   #1
Cook
 
jawnn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 56
Question 100% rye bread water ratio?

I need to make rye bread that is not like cake. Wheat flour is not desirable but wheat gluten is ok.
I found info about how much gluten: 2 or 3 tbsp per cup of rye flour. I used a little sorghum flour for rising. May molasses would work better?
Unfortunately my first attempt turned in clay. I used yeast, and dry onion flakes with ground caraway in a ferment (50% water/ flour), then after kneading it I put it in my little oven with the pilot light and a thermometer in the dough, 100 degrees I thought was just under the edge of killing the yeast, but it seems to have killed it anyhow. Or maybe the yeast was not dissolved enough….?
I can’t find any recipes of the simple bread I want t make, they all call for cake ingredients. Why can’t bread be simple? I read long ago that pioneers would just add water to the bag of flour and let it soak in, and not have to measure any water to flour ratio. I can’t even find an ideal ratio; maybe I should just try that old method.

How does Maltodextrin improve the body??
Is there more than just gluten in wheat that makes it rise easier?? I have made enough bread bricks in my years to build a house. I am unable to follow recipes; I refuse to add salt, white flour or eggs & milk’ I may compromise on adding whole wheat flour.

__________________

__________________
jawnn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 05:43 PM   #2
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,413
I'm not sure what you mean by "cake ingredients", because I've never made a recipe that called for milk or eggs.

Bread can be simple, but by not using wheat flour or following recipes you are making it difficult for yourself, and I don't think there is much that anyone here can do to help.

You might try this website. Warning: it contains recipes.

Rye Bread Recipes
__________________

__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2012, 06:43 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,884
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
In Scandinavia they make 100% rye bread. It's a two or three day process and uses both yeast and sourdough. It makes a very heavy loaf that is sliced very thin, ~2mm.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2013, 01:19 PM   #4
Cook
 
jawnn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 56
Exclamation

So what your saying is, you cant help me because ...you have not made such bread.. or because you can't think past recipe's (not enough experience with variations of this sort.)

Well that's why I do not like recipes'; no room for variation. follow it exactly or forget it.

Does any one know how the Maltodextrin works?

Also a rule of thumb fro water ratio?

Cake used to be made with yeast before baking soda. And the only difference twixt that and bread is the eggs, milk, butter, and sweetener.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I'm not sure what you mean by "cake ingredients", because I've never made a recipe that called for milk or eggs.

Bread can be simple, but by not using wheat flour or following recipes you are making it difficult for yourself, and I don't think there is much that anyone here can do to help.

You might try this website. Warning: it contains recipes.

Rye Bread Recipes
__________________
jawnn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2013, 01:51 PM   #5
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,396
Oh, wow, that is pretty rude there mister or Ms. I was going to tell you about my expirience with rye bread, that i have been experementing with for thelast few month, but i think I better not becasue I am afraid I may "not enough experience " for you.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2013, 01:52 PM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,884
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
It's always a good idea to follow the recipe the first time you make something. Then, start making variations.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2013, 02:05 PM   #7
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,413
Quote:
Originally Posted by jawnn View Post
So what your saying is, you cant help me because ...you have not made such bread.. or because you can't think past recipe's (not enough experience with variations of this sort.)
Well, I've been making my own bread for just over 20 years and I've probably made close to 1500 loaves in that time (and the vast majority have NOT been "bricks"). So I don't think lack of experience is the problem.

What I think is exactly what Taxlady says: that you should start with tried and tested recipes, and then develop your own variations. I don't use many recipes anymore, but I did when I was learning.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 02:13 PM   #8
Cook
 
jawnn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 56
Well I think that my problem was due to lack of yeast food or acidity.
Maltodextrin is any kind of fermented syrup; corn, barley, molasses, even agave.
I also think that most people do not know how to think analytically….In fact it looks like all recipes came from the same recipe long ago, just evolved. Isn’t that interesting?
__________________
jawnn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 02:55 PM   #9
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by jawnn View Post
I need to make rye bread that is not like cake. Wheat flour is not desirable but wheat gluten is ok.
I found info about how much gluten: 2 or 3 tbsp per cup of rye flour. I used a little sorghum flour for rising. May molasses would work better?
Unfortunately my first attempt turned in clay. I used yeast, and dry onion flakes with ground caraway in a ferment (50% water/ flour), then after kneading it I put it in my little oven with the pilot light and a thermometer in the dough, 100 degrees I thought was just under the edge of killing the yeast, but it seems to have killed it anyhow. Or maybe the yeast was not dissolved enough….?
I can’t find any recipes of the simple bread I want t make, they all call for cake ingredients. Why can’t bread be simple? I read long ago that pioneers would just add water to the bag of flour and let it soak in, and not have to measure any water to flour ratio. I can’t even find an ideal ratio; maybe I should just try that old method.

How does Maltodextrin improve the body??
Is there more than just gluten in wheat that makes it rise easier?? I have made enough bread bricks in my years to build a house. I am unable to follow recipes; I refuse to add salt, white flour or eggs & milk’ I may compromise on adding whole wheat flour.
Try a long cold ferment of a 50% rye flour and 50% water mix with upwards of 1 teaspoon of dry yeast. Ferment at ~65F for 12 - 18 hours. Then adjust consistency by stirring in enough additional water or flour to make the dough just too wet to knead. Refrigerate for 3 days, remixing daily. On the fourth day add another teaspoon or two of yeast, a like quantity of kosher salt and enough flour to make the dough kneadable. Knead untill the desired consistency is achieved. Form loaves, allow to rise covered in a 70F room for about 1 hour, slash and then bake in a preheated oven at a minimum temp of 375F.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 03:38 PM   #10
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,413
Careful, Bill. That kind of looks like a recipe.
__________________

__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bread, water

« Cast Iron Rolls | - »
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.