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Old 04-05-2015, 11:24 AM   #1
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A Most Delectable Bread

You've seen my written thoughts, and appreciation for the Spudnut Doughnut recipe in previous posts. Last night, I was in the mood to make some bread. I have several good recipes for white, wheat, and multi-grain breads, all of which give me great results (especially since I now, usually add vital wheat gluten to the flour mixture). But instead of using one of my bread recipes, I decided to use the Spudnut recipe, with a few tips I learned here on DC. The resulting bread was possible the best I've ever made. It is airy, light, moist, with a great yeasty, mildly sweet flavor that works perfectly with savory and sweet, such as gravies, or fruit jams.



Of course when it came out of the oven, DW and I both had a slice of warm bread with butter. It came out so good that with the first bite, my eyes rolled upward with that overwhelming sensation of something rare and wonderful. This morning, I made a piece of thick toast with it, spread on butter, then strawberry freezer jam. No eye rolls this time, as I knew what to expect. Instead, I ate it slowly, to make every bite tickle my senses as long as possible. For me at least, this was the perfect piece of toast.



Now I'm not bragging, as I certainly didn't creat the recipe. I've just used it in ways unique. It was originally a yeast-raised doughnut recipe. I've discovered that it is much more. And so, I give it to you. This recipe will make two loaves, with enough leftover to fry up some scones. Or, you can just make three loaves. I wanted three loaves. DW wanted some scones. I made two loaves with dough for a scones breakfast.



Here's the recipe, so you can enjoy this wonderful bread. I'm thinking that you could make really great English Muffins with it as well.



Spudnuts Bread:



Ingredients:



1 lb potatoes (about 3 medium russets)

2 1/4 cups whole milk

1/2 cup sugar

2 Large eggs

1 tbs. salt

1/2 cup cooking oil

8 cups all-purpose flour
2 Tbls dry yeast



Microwave, or boil potatoes until cooked through. Peel and mash until lump free. While the spuds a cooking, Heat the milk and sugar to a temperature of 110' F. Stir in the yeast until dissolved. Let sit until a head of froth develops on top. Beat in the eggs, salt, and cooking oil.



Add the mashed potatoes to the milk mixture and stir until all is creamy. Add the flour. Knead for ten minutes, or until smooth and elastic. Place in a 110' oven, with a pan of boiling water and let rise until doubled is size (about 20 minutes). Punch the dough down and fill buttered bread pans 2/3rds full of dough. Place the remainder of the dough in a zipper-freezer bag and place in your fridge for tomorrow's scones.



When the dough as again doubled, remove the pans from the oven and heat the oven to 375' F. Leave the pan of water in the oven. Place the loaf pans in, on the center shelf position, and bake for 30 minutes. When the crust is golden brown, lightly thump the bread with your knuckles. If it sounds somewhat hollow, it's done. Remove from the oven, and let cool for ten minutes. Remove the bread from the pans and let cool before bagging them.



And there you have it, one of the best breads you're gonna eat. Enjoy.



Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

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Old 04-11-2015, 04:36 AM   #2
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If it made your eyes roll, I gotta try this! Thank you!
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Old 04-11-2015, 09:09 AM   #3
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Thanks.
I'll try it this week.
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Old 04-12-2015, 04:54 PM   #4
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A Most Delectable Bread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
You've seen my written thoughts, and appreciation for the Spudnut Doughnut recipe in previous posts. Last night, I was in the mood to make some bread. I have several good recipes for white, wheat, and multi-grain breads, all of which give me great results (especially since I now, usually add vital wheat gluten to the flour mixture). But instead of using one of my bread recipes, I decided to use the Spudnut recipe, with a few tips I learned here on DC. The resulting bread was possible the best I've ever made. It is airy, light, moist, with a great yeasty, mildly sweet flavor that works perfectly with savory and sweet, such as gravies, or fruit jams.

Of course when it came out of the oven, DW and I both had a slice of warm bread with butter. It came out so good that with the first bite, my eyes rolled upward with that overwhelming sensation of something rare and wonderful. This morning, I made a piece of thick toast with it, spread on butter, then strawberry freezer jam. No eye rolls this time, as I knew what to expect. Instead, I ate it slowly, to make every bite tickle my senses as long as possible. For me at least, this was the perfect piece of toast.

Now I'm not bragging, as I certainly didn't creat the recipe. I've just used it in ways unique. It was originally a yeast-raised doughnut recipe. I've discovered that it is much more. And so, I give it to you. This recipe will make two loaves, with enough leftover to fry up some scones. Or, you can just make three loaves. I wanted three loaves. DW wanted some scones. I made two loaves with dough for a scones breakfast.

Here's the recipe, so you can enjoy this wonderful bread. I'm thinking that you could make really great English Muffins with it as well.

Spudnuts Bread:

Ingredients:

1 lb potatoes (about 3 medium russets)
2 1/4 cups whole milk
1/2 cup sugar
2 Large eggs
1 tbs. salt
1/2 cup cooking oil
8 cups all-purpose flour
2 Tbls dry yeast

Microwave, or boil potatoes until cooked through. Peel and mash until lump free. While the spuds a cooking, Heat the milk and sugar to a temperature of 110' F. Stir in the yeast until dissolved. Let sit until a head of froth develops on top. Beat in the eggs, salt, and cooking oil.

Add the mashed potatoes to the milk mixture and stir until all is creamy. Add the flour. Knead for ten minutes, or until smooth and elastic. Place in a 110' oven, with a pan of boiling water and let rise until doubled is size (about 20 minutes). Punch the dough down and fill buttered bread pans 2/3rds full of dough. Place the remainder of the dough in a zipper-freezer bag and place in your fridge for tomorrow's scones.

When the dough as again doubled, remove the pans from the oven and heat the oven to 375' F. Leave the pan of water in the oven. Place the loaf pans in, on the center shelf position, and bake for 30 minutes. When the crust is golden brown, lightly thump the bread with your knuckles. If it sounds somewhat hollow, it's done. Remove from the oven, and let cool for ten minutes. Remove the bread from the pans and let cool before bagging them.

And there you have it, one of the best breads you're gonna eat. Enjoy.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
There are a lot of precedents for the use of potatoes in bread, for example when the Corn Laws (in England) made bread very expensive and during WWII to eek out the flour supplies. Bread wasn't rationed during the war but flour was often in short supply. Back then most of our bread flour was imported from Canada because flour grown here wasn't "strong" enough to make very successful bread. Most flour available during the war was "soft" wholewheat which tended to make rather solid heavy bread and the addition of mashed potatoes tended to lighten it up a bit and improve the keeping.

Sorry, I'm doing my history teacher bit again! I hope you and DW didn't have indigestion after eating new bread warm from the over,
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Old 04-12-2015, 08:05 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
There are a lot of precedents for the use of potatoes in bread, for example when the Corn Laws (in England) made bread very expensive and during WWII to eek out the flour supplies. Bread wasn't rationed during the war but flour was often in short supply. Back then most of our bread flour was imported from Canada because flour grown here wasn't "strong" enough to make very successful bread. Most flour available during the war was "soft" wholewheat which tended to make rather solid heavy bread and the addition of mashed potatoes tended to lighten it up a bit and improve the keeping.

Sorry, I'm doing my history teacher bit again! I hope you and DW didn't have indigestion after eating new bread warm from the over,
I have a truly cast-iron stomach. DW didn't complain of any indigestion either.

Thanks for your good thoughts though, and the history lesson. Look up the history of Spudnuts on Wiki. 'Tis an interesting story.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 04-13-2015, 10:21 AM   #6
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I am not a bread eater as such, but if I have to have white bread, I prefer the potato bread.

MC, funny you should mention bread of England during WWII. We had a supermarket that sold Farmers Potato Bread in the early 60's. I bought it once and my husband who was from England fell in love with it. He told me all about his mother making her bread with potatoes due to the shortages and the war. He basically told me the same story as you just did. Thanks for the memory. He made a couple of loaves for me. They were delicious.
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Old 04-13-2015, 01:57 PM   #7
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A Most Delectable Bread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Spudnuts Bread:

Ingredients:

1 lb potatoes (about 3 medium russets)
2 1/4 cups whole milk
1/2 cup sugar
2 Large eggs
1 tbs. salt
1/2 cup cooking oil
8 cups all-purpose flour
2 Tbls dry yeast

Microwave, or boil potatoes until cooked through. Peel and mash until lump free. While the spuds a cooking, Heat the milk and sugar to a temperature of 110' F. Stir in the yeast until dissolved. Let sit until a head of froth develops on top. Beat in the eggs, salt, and cooking oil.


Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
How much yeast Chief?
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Old 04-13-2015, 04:32 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
How much yeast Chief?
Opps, Sorry about that. The recipe calls for 2 tbs. dry yeast.

Hope your bread comes out great.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 04-13-2015, 04:37 PM   #9
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A Most Delectable Bread

Fixt. Nice catch, Kay!
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Old 04-13-2015, 04:42 PM   #10
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Thanks Chief. I'm no baker but I thought maybe all those who said they were going to make it just "knew" how much yeast to use.
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