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Old 08-25-2013, 11:00 AM   #1
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Question Bread question for those in the know

I have been struggling to get that wonderful open texture in my bread. You know, full of holes that serve to make wells for tons of melting butter. You see this texture in ciabata bread (sometimes). What is it that gives bread this texture? My assumption is that I need more yeast and/or a longer second rise. But when I did that I got an even finer textured bread. What am I doing wrong? Recipe is 3 cups AP flour, 1/2 teaspoon yeast, 1/2 cup water, and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt. I also add 1/2 teaspoon sugar to get my yeast started.

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Old 08-25-2013, 11:13 AM   #2
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Well, for one thing, it takes two days to make it This allows the yeast to go to town and make a really well-developed flavor, as well as provide lots of carbon dioxide for making those holes. So you need more of both yeast and time.

Here's one recipe: http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recip...iabatta-recipe
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Old 08-25-2013, 11:26 AM   #3
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I let the bread rise overnight then again for an hour or so on the second rise. Still need a longer rise?
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Old 08-25-2013, 11:33 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joesfolk View Post
I let the bread rise overnight then again for an hour or so on the second rise. Still need a longer rise?
You didn't say originally how long you let it rise, so probably not. It looks to me as if the ratio of ingredients isn't quite right.

Another option is the no-knead bread developed by a writer at the New York Times. They allow it to rise for 22 hours in the fridge, then bake in a covered cast-iron pan to increase the heat as much as possible. It makes a lot of dough and keeps for up to two weeks in the fridge.
http://tastykitchen.com/recipes/brea...o-knead-bread/
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Old 08-25-2013, 11:53 AM   #5
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The No Knead bread is just what you are looking for if you want crusty bread with lots of wholes.

It's super easy, with the exception of timing the long rise.
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Old 08-25-2013, 12:09 PM   #6
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As one who doesn't like to bake, I too can vouch for this recipe, have made it several times. Super easy and good!
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Old 08-25-2013, 12:15 PM   #7
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This was my first try at no knead bread. FANTASTIC toasted with butter and is great for meatloaf sammies!! LOL



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Old 08-25-2013, 12:34 PM   #8
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Rapid expansion of the bread in the oven is what creates those holes. The problem is that it takes moisture in the form of steam to get the job done.

When you put a loaf of bread into the oven without any moisture, the crust begins to harden within a few minutes and prevents further expansion of the loaf.

One trick you can do is to put an empty metal pan on the bottom rack of the oven while preheating it. When you put the loaf in, quickly (because you don't want to let the heat out of the oven) add a cup of very hot water to the pan. This will create the steam needed for those critical first 10 minutes your bread is baking.

http://www.thekitchn.com/food-scienc...team-whe-76586
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Old 08-25-2013, 12:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joesfolk View Post
I have been struggling to get that wonderful open texture in my bread. You know, full of holes that serve to make wells for tons of melting butter. You see this texture in ciabata bread (sometimes). What is it that gives bread this texture? My assumption is that I need more yeast and/or a longer second rise. But when I did that I got an even finer textured bread. What am I doing wrong? Recipe is 3 cups AP flour, 1/2 teaspoon yeast, 1/2 cup water, and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt. I also add 1/2 teaspoon sugar to get my yeast started.
BTW I used to make dense loaves of bread. I find more water produces a crumb with more holes.
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Old 08-25-2013, 01:41 PM   #10
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Thanks everyone. I'll have to wait till next weekend to try again. My cupboard is teeming with bread now.
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