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Old 05-26-2011, 02:56 PM   #1
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Question Cheesy Bread Problem

Copied from Badger & Blade forum as no one's said anything.
I'm having a problem with my cheesy bread at the moment. When I make it, I do the required raising and roll it out flat. Then I sprinkle shredded cheese (mozzarella or cheddar, or both) on that and roll it up to fit in my bread pan. Comes out absolutely beautiful. But it stays all doughy in the center!

If I bake it at a lower temperature for longer will this fix it? I modified my pizza recipe as I had the same type of problem. The bread is perfect, light, airy and so much better than my mother's bread machine bread.
Sometimes the loaves turn out right, but sometimes they don't. Would leaving them in the pans to cool help?

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Old 05-26-2011, 03:42 PM   #2
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>>Sometimes the loaves turn out right, but sometimes they don't. Would leaving them in the pans to cool help

well, something is happening different.

given your info on different methods/approaches, some slightly more detailed/specifc informations could be of some help to sort out the problem.
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Old 05-26-2011, 03:43 PM   #3
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What temperature and for how long is it baking now? Are they using a thermometer?
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Old 05-26-2011, 03:48 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scaevola View Post
...If I bake it at a lower temperature for longer will this fix it?...
That's my first thought. You might drop the oven 25 degrees and bake for an additional 15-20 minutes while watching the color of your crust, letting it get a nice dark brown as an indicator of the longer baking time.
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Old 05-26-2011, 04:23 PM   #5
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I'm still unpacking as I'm home from school for the summer, so I haven't unpacked that recipe book and I don't know where my mother's copy is.

My ex-boyfriend would start saying they need to come out when they started looking at all golden on the top, even though he doesn't cook, so it was hard to judge when they were actually done.

I've only made it a couple times, but when they did set right it seemed to be when I left them in the pans instead of pulling them out after they came out of the oven. So that led me to my thought that they need to cook longer.
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Old 05-26-2011, 05:19 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by scaevola View Post
My ex-boyfriend would start saying they need to come out when they started looking at all golden on the top, even though he doesn't cook, so it was hard to judge when they were actually done.

.
It's actually sort of the opposite, much of the time. You need to hold back until the bread is done. A thermometer will help.
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Old 05-26-2011, 05:24 PM   #7
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There's nothing in the recipe that says what temperature to cook it to.

It's only the very center of the loaf that's at all "not done" so a thermometer test won't do much, as the thermometer I have for baking doesn't go in that much, and it's a tad big for a toothpick test.
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Old 05-26-2011, 06:59 PM   #8
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Most crusty-type bread should be 190-200 (measured in the center) when done.

Buy a cheap probe thermometer. You can use it for a zillion things.
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Old 05-26-2011, 07:39 PM   #9
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Like a meat probe? I have one of those. I just didn't know I could use it for anything else.
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Old 05-26-2011, 11:08 PM   #10
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Like a meat probe? I have one of those. I just didn't know I could use it for anything else.
YES. Depending on the type they go pretty low and pretty high. Very, very useful,
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