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Old 02-02-2014, 08:11 PM   #1
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Could milk be used to make bread?

Since all recipe's add water for bread making, i was just wondering if milk would be used, and what might the affects be.

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Old 02-02-2014, 08:37 PM   #2
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My MIL used milk to proof the yeast before adding it to the flour. I believe that the extra fat, and protein from the milk would add body and extra moisture to the bread. On the downside, the bread would have to be carefully watched, and I would worry about the milk spoiling, as bread rises in ideal conditions to create milk spoilage. That's pr0bably why milk isn't used. I have seen powdered milk added to bread recipes though. And I know milk is often used to make biscuits. Buttermilk is often used in baking recipes because the living cultures create an inhospitable environment for other critters. The bread would have a mildly sour flavor, like a sourdough, but probably would be very good.

Hope that helps.

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Old 02-02-2014, 08:54 PM   #3
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I'm wondering if you mean, specifically, the liquid used to proof the yeast. If so, I've done that and had no problem. If you mean using only milk as the liquid, I've done that also, no problem. I'm sure with a little research a recipe will come up for an all milk bread, no water, recipe and you would probably end up with a softer loaf.
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Old 02-03-2014, 12:52 AM   #4
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Yes, i was just wondering if milk could be used in the break making process, instead of water, I guess it wouldn't hurt, just too chicken to try it.
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Old 02-03-2014, 05:35 AM   #5
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I have used fresh milk, canned milk and powdered milk to make bread with no problems. It changes the texture of the bread and also helps to keep it fresh/soft for a few days. You can also add eggs and butter to the dough, along with the milk, if you want a rich dough for sweet breads. I still use a 1/4 cup of water to proof the yeast. It really depends on what you are making. Italian style bread is pretty much just flour, salt, yeast and water. Country or farm style white bread is likely to contain half milk, half water and a little butter. Keep reading recipes and asking questions, it will all fall into place with some practice.
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Old 02-03-2014, 06:48 AM   #6
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Actually, quite a few recipes call for only milk, particularly sweet breads. There are also recipes that use only whey (leftover liquid from cheesemaking). Not sure where you got the idea that all bread recipes call for water .
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:32 AM   #7
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I was curious about using milk, but i'll stick to water when making my dough.
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:49 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
, and I would worry about the milk spoiling, as bread rises in ideal conditions to create milk spoilage. That's pr0bably why milk isn't used.
Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
No, the milk doesn't spoil in that amount of time. I've made a family favorite for holidays for 30+ years that uses ONLY milk as the liquid, and uses fresh whole eggs and real butter as well, and have never had a problem. BTW, it's a Betty Crocker recipe.
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Old 02-03-2014, 08:08 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
No, the milk doesn't spoil in that amount of time. I've made a family favorite for holidays for 30+ years that uses ONLY milk as the liquid, and uses fresh whole eggs and real butter as well, and have never had a problem. BTW, it's a Betty Crocker recipe.
Thanks. I was postulating. I knew the milk would make the dough sweeter, and more moist. But I was simply concerned that the acids produced by the yeast would react with the milk. Thank you (and the rest of you as well) for teaching me something new.

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Old 02-03-2014, 12:12 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmaker60 View Post
Since all recipe's add water for bread making, i was just wondering if milk would be used, and what might the affects be.
Yes, you get a softer crumb and the crust isn't as crusty when you use a mixture of milk and water. I don't normally use all milk unless a recipe asks for it. Sweet doughs often use milk.

The recipe I use for muffins (ours not yours) asks for milk and water and I us it if I'm making a plaited loaf for pulling apart and I don't want bits of crust flying around when we're eating it.

We can buy a soft sliced loaf in the UK which goes under the name of "milk bread" so presumably contains milk. It's mass-produced and a bit nasty IMO but some people like it.
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