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Old 11-19-2011, 04:10 PM   #1
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Hoagie rolls

Around here we call them sub rolls but hoagie rolls seems to be what the "universal" term is. I am fairly new to breadmaking and have been working on my rolls. Sandwich or burger style rolls aren't too bad, flattening, folding, then rolling/shaping into round balls. But I can't seem to make a long roll, like one for a hot dog, sausage, or hoagie. I try to roll the dough between my hands to stretch it out and I think I am working it too much. But then when I get the dough into a log shape and let it sit to rise, they shrink back down into ovals, much wider in the middle than at the end and any hot dog or sausage hangs out of both ends!

I have been looking for videos on good hoagie-making technique but haven't found one yet. Maybe someone here has seen one or can describe the proper technique to make a hoagie-style roll? TY!

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Old 11-19-2011, 06:11 PM   #2
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They work best when baked in the right pans

Chicago Metallic Uni-Lock™ Baguette / French Bread Loaf Pan 49036 | Bread Pans - Wasserstrom Restaurant Supply
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Old 11-19-2011, 06:41 PM   #3
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I might consider getting something like that. But what is the proper method to take a ball of dough and elongate it into the proper hoagie shape?
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Old 02-18-2012, 11:47 PM   #4
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I am also getting into making hoagie rolls. I now make decent dinner rolls, and need a good sandwich roll. There may be good information online from Reinhart's bread book. I believe you make a rectangle, then fold and pinch the seams, and finally roll it tapering the ends, similar to making a baguette. Then you may want them to proof in the above mentioned pan.
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Old 02-18-2012, 11:52 PM   #5
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it's like making a baguette, the dough should be flat, then roll it, proof it again, slice the tho down the length, butter and bake.
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Old 02-18-2012, 11:54 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taurus430 View Post
I am also getting into making hoagie rolls. I now make decent dinner rolls, and need a good sandwich roll. There may be good information online from Reinhart's bread book. I believe you make a rectangle, then fold and pinch the seams, and finally roll it tapering the ends, similar to making a baguette. Then you may want them to proof in the above mentioned pan.

My bad, didn't see you right above me, but yes. and honestly, you don't even need a pan/form/mold.
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Old 02-19-2012, 12:00 AM   #7
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Maybe the following site will help you. It is rather long and you have to go rather far down to get the answer to your problem. Plus there are some excellent tips for making bread.

Farmgirl Fare: Ten Tips on How To Bake Better Artisan Breads at Home

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Old 02-19-2012, 03:06 AM   #8
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If you don't mind soft sides, try laying them out side by side in a 9X13 inch pan. Leave some space between them when you set them to rise and as they expand they will provide some support to each other. Sort of like large New England style hot dog rolls.
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Old 02-19-2012, 03:22 AM   #9
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I've not baked bread for years. I do notice what local supermarkets offer up as their daily fresh baked "rolls for hoagies" (subs or whatever). Some bake their bread from dough that is almost too fluffy. A hoagie roll should be slightly firm to chew.

Doesn't the dough you start with have a lot to do with how genuine a hoagie type roll ends up baking from a breadmaker?
I passed on this one major chains offering of hoagie rolls, they were too squishy soft.

It almost leads me to believe that a home type breadmaker can't duplicate deli style hoagie rolls baked in supermarket ovens.
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Old 02-19-2012, 04:24 AM   #10
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are you in northern or western ny, pigskin?

the reason i ask is that in southwestern ny, the bread/sandwiches that you referrred to are known as heroes or even baguettes, french or italian loafs, or portugese rolls.

subs also, but less commonly, and then there's hoagies or grinders.
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