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Old 03-28-2012, 08:19 AM   #11
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I want to start this no knead bread today but... the recipe I looked up after watching the video says the 12 - 20 hours you leave the dough out should be in a room temp of about 70 F. It gets down to the 50's here at night & we've already turned off the heat because it gets 70's & 80's in the day time. Will this be an issue?
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Old 03-28-2012, 08:50 AM   #12
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Bread dough doesn't have a watch and can't tell time. You need to let it double. Colder conditions slow the rise, so the only issue should be do you have time for a longer rise?

Remember once you put yeast into water, flour and salt your life is no longer your own. Those little yeastie beasties are now in charge and when they are ready you are expected to show and up do your part.
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Old 03-28-2012, 09:09 AM   #13
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Ok. I think I will turn the heat back on tonight for quality assurance & productivity's sake. Thank you.:-)
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Old 03-28-2012, 09:11 AM   #14
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Also could I sub out king Arthur's whole wheat flour for a.p. flour?
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Old 03-28-2012, 09:30 AM   #15
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Quality likely wouldn't be affected with the lower rising temperatures (at least to a point). Usually the longer the rise the better the flavor as it has more time to develop. Time is really the only factor in a sense of do you have enough time, or will you be ready when the bread is.

More or less you can sub out whole wheat flour for all or part of the AP flour (mind you I use bread flour not AP flour). Whole wheat hydrates slower and doesn't produce as nice a rise as white flour. You may want to try a mix to start. With my bread I use a ratio of 70/30 or 80/20 depending on my mood (bread flour/white whole wheat).

If you use all whole wheat you may need to add vital wheat gluten or you may end with a very dense loaf.

Be careful about changing too many factors at one time. It is best when running experiments to change one thing at a time to see what the effects are. If you make too many changes you can't be sure what caused what.

The upside with bread is if you totally bomb with it your time is really the biggest waste, the ingredients are cheap enough and you can always find a duck pond and make the little quackers happy.
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Old 03-28-2012, 10:06 AM   #16
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I've got bread flour also. So, I will do two batches. One batch with just a.p. flour, another with bread flour alone to start with so I can see the difference. I just realized my whole wheat flour is out of date anyway. I'll maybe incorporate a little of that next batch when I get fresh flour.
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Old 03-28-2012, 10:10 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankZ

The upside with bread is if you totally bomb with it your time is really the biggest waste, the ingredients are cheap enough and you can always find a duck pond and make the little quackers happy.
Great idea. I've started walking at a nearby Botanical Garden that has a couple of duck ponds on it. Those ducks will be well fed... well actually I hope I don't screw up that much. We'll see.
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Old 03-28-2012, 10:14 AM   #18
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AP flour tends to be lower protein and hence less gluten development.
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Old 03-28-2012, 10:22 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FluffyAngel View Post
I want to start this no knead bread today but... the recipe I looked up after watching the video says the 12 - 20 hours you leave the dough out should be in a room temp of about 70 F. It gets down to the 50's here at night & we've already turned off the heat because it gets 70's & 80's in the day time. Will this be an issue?
Not at all. As Frank says, it will only affect yeast activity. When I make bread, I sometimes put the dough right in the fridge. It continues to rise, just more slowly. Yeast activity is not nearly predictable as you might think. Sometimes it will rise just as quickly in the fridge as on the countertop.

The recipe as shown is almost too simple to be believed. But it does work. As tempting as it might be, for this recipe I wouldn't use 100% whole wheat. Maybe a half-half mix at most. Either bread flour or AP will work, too. I like bread flour myself, but have used both with good results.

The other thing is to make sure you heat the Dutch oven for at least 30 minutes before putting the dough in it. Just put it in the oven when you turn it on to preheat. 450 degrees is fine. It doesn't have to be 500 like the video says. Move quickly when you do put the dough in the pan. You don't want the pan or the oven to cool off. The steam that forms between the wet dough and hot pan is what makes the crust so outstanding in this loaf.
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Old 03-29-2012, 01:48 PM   #20
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Both versions did well. I'm not sure which one was which but - I think the one with bread flour was the one that was more firm & held its shape better. I believe the regular a.p. flour dough spread more. Both were good, had the overall same taste but I preferred the firmer one. Now, I wonder which flour that was? Hmmm...
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