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Old 08-13-2013, 05:25 AM   #21
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I'm wondering what would happen if I'd take water out completely?
When I make French bread, I always put a pan of water and a water-soaked brick in the oven. I also mist the walls of the oven. I do bake it at 400 or 425. I would try bumping up the oven temp. Also, do you have the water in while preheating the oven?
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Old 08-13-2013, 09:35 AM   #22
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I did not have water when I was preheating. Put the tray with water in right before the bread, per recipe.
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Old 08-13-2013, 09:38 AM   #23
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Hmmm...I always put mine in when preheating the oven. I "mist" the oven walls when I put the bread in. Don't know why I do that--that's the way my grandma did it.
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Old 08-13-2013, 09:48 AM   #24
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I'll try it again soon, it was very simple recipe, though rising took a long time, but that is no problem.
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Old 08-13-2013, 09:52 AM   #25
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Experiment! Like I said, I don't know why I do it the way I do except that was how my grandma did it and that is how I learned to do it.
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Old 08-13-2013, 10:52 AM   #26
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Water creates steam, and steam helps the loaf puff up in the oven.

When I bake bread, I bake it in a dutch oven. For the first half hour, I leave the lid on the dutch oven. This creates steam, which increases the size of the loaf. For the last 20-30 minutes, I remove the lid. This helps crisp up the crust. The result is a loaf with both good rise and a good crust.
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Old 08-13-2013, 01:45 PM   #27
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I'm wondering what would happen if I'd take water out completely?
It would be crumbly not crunchy.
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Old 08-14-2013, 08:56 AM   #28
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I love to make both bread and cheeses at home. There is a wonderful bread that is made from the whey you pour off when making mozzarella....rather than just throwing away this typically unused product, it can be made into a beautiful loaf that is crusty on the outside but tender and fluffy on the inside.
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:56 PM   #29
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I love to make both bread and cheeses at home. There is a wonderful bread that is made from the whey you pour off when making mozzarella....rather than just throwing away this typically unused product, it can be made into a beautiful loaf that is crusty on the outside but tender and fluffy on the inside.
Do you have a recipe or link to one? I plan on making a soft cheese in the near future. Would love to use the whey...although the chickens would probably like it.
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Old 08-16-2013, 02:41 PM   #30
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You use the whey from making mozzarella to make ricotta. Ricotta was invented as a way to use the whey left over from moz.
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