"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches > Yeast Breads, Rolls & Braids
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-30-2012, 09:37 PM   #21
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,398
Honestly I do not think it tasted the same as the bread I was looking for, but it did tasted very good and fairly close.

1 lb. flour I used bread flour and whole wheat flour 70-30
13 oz. water, maybe just a drop more.
1 pack yeast, I was not sure about exact amount as the recipe was in grams and also it called for fresh yeast cake
1/4 oz. salt
It did not call for sugar, but I put about a tea spoon.

Made starter (is it what it calls in English) using yeast, sugar about a third of both water and flour.

The recipe called for starter to seat for 4 hours, I had no time, waited for about hour 15 minutes, added the rest of flour salt and water, mixed well, using KA, do not over mix.
Covered let it seat, after an hour I pushed the dough down put it on the counter, made two balls sprinkled with flour let it seat again for maybe half an hour. After another half an hour I put in on the baking sheet, sprinkled, heavily, with flour and baked for about 30-35 minutes at 425 deg. The original recipe called for double the recipe and making two loaves, I did not wanted ruin it too much bread, but it was good I will make 2 loaves next time. The only thing I will have to try 75-25 flour mix.
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2012, 09:45 PM   #22
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,398
What is "oven spring"? For this particular bread I do not want to slush the top as it is not how the bread was made originally.
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2012, 10:12 PM   #23
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,297
"oven spring" is the extra rise you get when it goes into the oven, before the baking stops anymore rise.
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2012, 06:42 PM   #24
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
українська: полба? (spelt)?
Spelt is the closest thing to dinkel that is available in the US.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2012, 07:43 AM   #25
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,398
Never heard of it. Have to look up.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2012, 08:11 AM   #26
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
Never heard of it. Have to look up.
Good Luck with your research. Please let us know how it turns out. There are plenty of YouTube shows out there about baking. Many of the European breads are quite dense (heavy) by US standards.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2012, 09:23 AM   #27
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,398
Many US breads are not even consider breads by Russian standards. People laugh at "wonder bread" and a like. I was suffering without bread for years before this awesome bread bakery opened, baking old world breads. French, Italian, German, I love the place. I think I gain 20 pounds since they've opened. I can live on their bread.

As far as my search. You were right it is spelt. I doubt that was ever used in soviet days. Simply like everything else in Soviet Union there were standards and the quality ranking: 1-st, second, 3-rd level of quality. 1-st being the best, the finest. The flour used for this bread was a 2-nd level, which meant it was not as fine, not as clean, whatever else. I think I will continue making this bread on occasion. As I said the “Breadsmith”, that's the name of the bakery, produces awesome breads and I am pretty happy with it. But once in a while it is great to have variety.

Thank you.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2012, 09:40 AM   #28
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,413
We have a Breadsmith close to where I work.

Charlie, you might also check out Brianno's Italian Deli in Eagan. They're fresh baked peasant bread is excellent. They are on Cliff Rd near Cedar.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2012, 09:45 AM   #29
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,398
Thanks Steve I know, I used to love that place.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2012, 09:50 AM   #30
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
Many US breads are not even consider breads by Russian standards. People laugh at "wonder bread" and a like. I was suffering without bread for years before this awesome bread bakery opened, baking old world breads. French, Italian, German, I love the place. I think I gain 20 pounds since they've opened. I can live on their bread.

As far as my search. You were right it is spelt. I doubt that was ever used in soviet days. Simply like everything else in Soviet Union there were standards and the quality ranking: 1-st, second, 3-rd level of quality. 1-st being the best, the finest. The flour used for this bread was a 2-nd level, which meant it was not as fine, not as clean, whatever else. I think I will continue making this bread on occasion. As I said the “Breadsmith”, that's the name of the bakery, produces awesome breads and I am pretty happy with it. But once in a while it is great to have variety.

Thank you.
One of the best things for me about moving out of New York City was being forced to learn how to bake my own bread. Being able to bake the bread one likes gives one a certain sense of freedom and independence. The ultimate would be the ability to raise one's own grain and process it into flour but a- that's a lot of work and b- it's awful damp where I live.
__________________

__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
flour

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.