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Old 11-16-2008, 05:47 PM   #1
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ISO good solid directions for making bread

Hi all

I'm going to try to make bread this week - but I've never been successful in the past. I always kill the yeast somehow. Can anyone provide me with a link to really good bread making directions and does anyone have any tips?

I've decided I MUST learn to do this. Challenge 08.

So far, the deer have been enjoying what I chuck off the deck for them.

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Old 11-16-2008, 06:20 PM   #2
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what kind of yeast? are you proofing it in water first?
dont make the water too hot. 100 degrees is cooler than you would think... use a thermometer if you are not sure.
I dont have a link just a long list of screw-ups.
good luck!
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Old 11-16-2008, 06:33 PM   #3
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we have many very good bread making people here at d.c. look in forums, i am sure you will find several threads on yeast bread there
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Old 11-16-2008, 08:31 PM   #4
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Hi Jeni78,

Here's a pretty good recipe that I use for both loaf bread as well as sanwich rolls and hot dog buns. Yep, same dough, just shape it differently. Here ya go...

Basic White Bread Recipe
For KitchenAid Stand Mixer

Ingredients:

1/2C (4 oz.) milk
3 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt
3 tablespoons butter or margarine
2 (1/4 ounce) packages active dry yeast or 2 teaspoons Instant Yeast (.34 oz.)
1-1/2 C (12 oz.) warm water (105F to 110F)
5-6 C (1# 13 oz.) Unbleached bread flour

Directions:

1. Combine milk, sugar, salt, and butter in small saucepan. Heat over low heat and stir until butter melts and sugar dissolves. Cool to lukewarm (less than 110 F.
2. If using active dry yeast, dissolve yeast in warm water in warmed bowl and let stand for 10 minutes. If using Instant Yeast, just add it to the flour and mix it in before adding liquids.
3. Add lukewarm milk mixture and water to 4 1/2 C (1# 6 oz.) flour. Attach bowl and dough hook. Turn to speed 2 and mix 1 minute. Continuing on speed 2, add remaining flour, 1/2 C (2.5 oz.) at a time (slowly so it doesn’t fly out of bowl), until dough clings to hook and cleans side of bowl. Knead on speed 2 for 2 minutes longer, or until dough is smooth and elastic. Dough will be slightly sticky to the touch. (At this point I take the dough and knead it for 5-7 minutes, adding flour as needed, until I get the “feel” I want from the dough.)
4. Place in a greased bowl, turning to grease top. Cover; let rise in warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk, about an hour.
5. Punch dough down and divide in half. Shape each half into a loaf and place in a greased 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 2 1/2-inch loaf pan. Cover; let rise in warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour.
6. Bake at 400 degrees F for 30 minutes. Remove from pans immediately and cool on wire racks.

For Hamburger and hot dog buns, divide the dough into 2-1/2 oz portions and shape into a ball. Allow dough balls to rest for 5 minutes, then flatten with the heel of your hand and place on cookie sheet dusted with cornmeal. Allow about 1” between rolls for expansion/proofing. For hot dog buns, shape into about 5-6” long tubes with seam down. Brush with wisked egg white/water mix and sprinkle with sesame or poppy seeds. Bake at 400° F for 12-14 minutes or until 200° F.


Here's what the loaf bread looks like...




...and here are the sandwich/hamburger buns...



Have fun, and just take your time and follow the directions. You'll be surprised at just how easy it is to make bread. Don't be afraid to ask questions, because there are a lot of bread bakers who can give you good direction. We're all interested in your success. Also, if you buy Instant Yeast, you don't have to go through the process of blooming the yeast in water. The Instant Yeast just gets mixed in with your dry ingredients. Lastly, be sure your water and milk are below 110 degrees F. An inexpensive ($6.95 at Bed Bath & Beyond, Target or Wal-Mart) thermometer that goes up to 200 F, will help you monitor the liquid, and you can also check to see if your bread is done with the same thermometer. If the bread is 195-200 F, it's done.

JoeV
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Old 11-16-2008, 08:34 PM   #5
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Thanks so much!

It seems I need to buy bread flour? I didn't know there was a difference. LOL, maybe that has been my problem?
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Old 11-16-2008, 08:35 PM   #6
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Crap I don't have the kitchen aid mixer. Was going to go at this by hand...
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Old 11-16-2008, 08:53 PM   #7
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Jeni, this recipe was easy enough for even ME to succeed with! NY Times bread recipe--what FUN

Lee
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Old 11-16-2008, 09:16 PM   #8
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No problem. You can do this by hand or in a stand mixer. Here's the drill;

In a large bowl combine the milk mixture and warm water. Begin to stir in flour using a heavy wooden spoon, mixing until you cannot stir it any longer. Pour out the dough onto your work surface and begin kneading in the balance of the flour until it's all combined and the dough is smooth (not sticky) and elastic. You'll knead the dough for about 8-10 minutes. The dough is elastic when you shape into a ball and take two fingers and press into the dough about 3/4" deep. The finger marks should spring back when the dough is fully kneaded. Then follow the balance of the recipe.

Here's a good video link to see how to knead the flour into the dough.

Hand Kneed Bread Dough: How to Make Homemade Bread | eHow.com

JoeV
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Old 11-16-2008, 09:27 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QSis View Post
Jeni, this recipe was easy enough for even ME to succeed with! NY Times bread recipe--what FUN

Lee
Yes, this is another way to get started baking bread that is virtually foolproof. If you haven't seen the no-knead bread, here's somethimg to whet your appetite.





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Old 11-16-2008, 11:00 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeV View Post
Pour out the dough onto your work surface and begin kneading in the balance of the flour until it's all combined. . .
Jeni78, you may not need all the flour that any bread recipe calls for. When I teach breadmaking, I tell my students to stop short approximately 1/2 cup of the lowest amount of flour called for. For example, if the recipe calls for 4 to 5 cups of flour, stop at the 3-1/2 cups and see how your dough feels. If it is still loose, very sticky, gradually add more flour in small amounts, like a tablespoon at a time, kneading that amount in well and before adding more. Continue to add the flour in the small amounts until the dough is smooth and soft. Once you reach that point, you can then knead for 6-8 minutes. Be careful when flouring your countertop or table, where ever it is you are kneading, as even that flour can be too much flour incorporated into you dough. As an alternative, you can lightly grease your dough, your hands, and the countertop with some veggie oil and continue to knead it that way, thus avoiding adding too much flour.

Also, you do not always have to use bread flour. Using "all purpose" flour is fine. If a recipe does not state bread flour, it is all purpose flour it is referring to. If you wish to use bread flour, keep in mind that you will need less bread flour than all purpose flour. DO avoid using any "self-rising" flours, however, as that type of flour contains leavening agents such as baking powder and/or baking soda, and you do not need those added to your bread!

Also, as already mentioned several times in this thread, invest in a thermometer, an instant read type, if you can. It will not only help you with your yeast, so you do not kill it with too hot liquid, it will aid you by not activting it with not hot enough. More and more bread recipes are also stating internal temperatures of your baked loaf and the instant read thermometer will be very helpful at this point.

Just relax and have fun and you'll be turning out great loaves in no time!

JoeV, great looking loaves!!
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