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Old 08-08-2012, 11:59 AM   #1
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Italian Bread used the same recipe, tastes different

Several months ago I made a bread that I have never made. Found the recipe online, labeled as Italian Bread. It was AMAZING. I made it twice that week and we loved it. You could really taste the olive oil

Every since then, I've used the same recipe, and the bread has no flavor...none. I've probably tried it 10 more times. Also used the same olive oil and other ingredients.

The recipe is simple. I put it in the bread machine on dough cycle then transfer it to cook in the oven . Mix 1 cup water with 2 tablespoons olive oil, and 2 teaspoons of yeast and 2 teaspoons of sugar, let it bubble a bit. Add about 3 cups flour and 1 teaspoon of salt.

I can't figure out why it had such a great flavor the first two times and now is bland.

Help!!!!!!!!!!!

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Old 08-08-2012, 12:11 PM   #2
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Welcome from Italy on DC forums, drnewman6

I'm no master in bread making, but I'm sure that some of our friends here will come to the rescue...
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Old 08-08-2012, 12:26 PM   #3
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By chance, have you changed the Olive Oil Brand or Type ?

Have you had an extreme change in climate perhaps ?

How do you store your flour and other products ?

The machine, is it totally clean of crumbs or dough that might have stuck to the interior parts ?

Just investigating ...

Have lovely August,
Margi.
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Old 08-08-2012, 12:32 PM   #4
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Howdy!
Welcome to D.C.
I am in the same boat with my compadre, Luca. I can make bread, but I ain't no expert.
Is the flour fresh? Same brand?
Are you certain of the yeast measure? Too much yeast can affect the flavor. Too little and the rise will be affected.
Good question, Margi.. How is your flour stored?
Mrs Hoot and I have an on-going discussion about flour storage. She stores it in the refrigerator, which means I have to let the flour come to room temp before I make bread.
We have a number of baking superstars here....They will be along shortly.
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Old 08-08-2012, 12:52 PM   #5
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Hoot,

Thanks for compliment. We are on the same wavelength. I bake bread for holidays or special occasions ... I am good at it, however, not a professional baker or caterer or chef.

Kindest.
Ciao, Margi.
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Old 08-08-2012, 03:03 PM   #6
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Flavor comes from fermentation, which in turn causes the dough to rise. The longer the rise, the better the flavor. Is it possible you made your first loaves during the winter months, when it might've taken longer for the dough to rise?

The recipe I use for my "everyday bread" recipe calls for only a quarter teaspoon of yeast for 3 cups of flour. Then it's left to rise for up to 24 hours at room temperature. In this case, it's actually less yeast that creates better flavor, since it takes much longer for the cells to propagate and do their business.

What I would suggest is cutting back on the amount of yeast - maybe a teaspoon instead of two, and then allowing a longer rise time.
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Old 08-08-2012, 03:33 PM   #7
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Ok, let me see if I can answer all of you and thanks for your input.

I use the same brand of Olive Oil and the same flour. Now how I store it could be different from the first times because I normally keep it in the frig but I have been keeping it in cannisters, simply because of space in the frig lately........ but it doesn't set long because I bake so much that my flour doesn't stay around more than a week or two, at the most. It was probably in the 70's or 80's the first times I made it and it has been in the 100's now but I made more loaves when it was still around the same temp that also didn't taste right. Also, my house is about the same temp year around.

Now, I could try decreasing the yeast a bit and letting it rise longer, I didn't think about that but I'm sure that I use the same amount each time, as I use the same measuring spoons.

Is there a brand of Olive Oil that anyone recommends because of superior flavor?

Everyone else likes the bread but since my husband and I ate the first two loaves, we know it is not right, its just plain.

Thanks!!
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Old 08-08-2012, 03:39 PM   #8
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Couple of new questions It sounds like your yeast is not old, since you bake often, but just checking - it is still good? Also, I had a problem with bread-baking several years ago - it turned out, the water I used was too cool and so the yeast didn't get going enough. I started measuring water temp with an instant-read thermometer and have not had a problem since. Hope that helps.
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Old 08-08-2012, 04:41 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Flavor comes from fermentation, which in turn causes the dough to rise. The longer the rise, the better the flavor. Is it possible you made your first loaves during the winter months, when it might've taken longer for the dough to rise?

The recipe I use for my "everyday bread" recipe calls for only a quarter teaspoon of yeast for 3 cups of flour. Then it's left to rise for up to 24 hours at room temperature. In this case, it's actually less yeast that creates better flavor, since it takes much longer for the cells to propagate and do their business.

What I would suggest is cutting back on the amount of yeast - maybe a teaspoon instead of two, and then allowing a longer rise time.
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Old 08-08-2012, 08:57 PM   #10
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Actually I have similar problem with my bread. But I know for sure that I did not use the same amount of flour, unless you weigh flour it is not the same, I did not let it rise the same amount of time, and probably whole bunch of other little things that in the end affect the end result.
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