"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches > Yeast Breads, Rolls & Braids
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-29-2017, 07:29 PM   #1
Sous Chef
 
JustJoel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 803
Japanese shokupan/Tang zhon

I searched all the bread sub-forums for this unique starter. Itís used to make Japanese shokupan, or milk bread. Technically itís not a starter, itís a roux. Liquid/flour at a 5:1 ratio, with the flour being at 5% of the total flour. Itís then heated and whisked until it reaches 150įf, when it gelatinizes. Itís then cooled to room temp, and added the to other ingredients. I have yet to try it; I wondered if any of you have any experience with it?

If youíve never had shokupan, youíre missing out! Pillowy, fine crumb, delightfully square (makes it easy to slice). And because of the tang zhon, it keeps better than regular breads (thereís a whole lotta science behind that). Nothing is better in the morning than a steaming cup of dark, sweet coffee, and a thick slice of shokupan slathered with butter and jam.

__________________

__________________
Dance like no oneís watching, sing like no oneís listening, but cook like EVERYONE is eating!
https://justjoel59.wordpress.com
JustJoel is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2017, 07:39 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Park Drive Bar/Grill Los Angeles
Posts: 11,199
Problem with pre-sliced Japanese breads is that they're too thick to fit in standard American toasters.
__________________

roadfix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2017, 09:42 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 10,916
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJoel View Post
...Technically it’s not a starter, it’s a roux. Liquid/flour at a 5:1 ratio..
Technically technically, it's not a starter nor a roux - it is a slurry. A roux is equal parts fat and flour, period. A slurry is a dry thickening agent (flour, cornstarch, arrowroot) thoroughly combined with a liquid (water, broth, juice) at a ratio of 1:4.

What's the difference between a roux and a slurry?

You are welcome to my allotment of sweetener for your coffee. I'll have mine plain and black, please.
__________________
"Eating ruins your appetite"~Mom

"The only running I do anymore is running late..."~~~moi
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2017, 10:41 PM   #4
Sous Chef
 
JustJoel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 803
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
Problem with pre-sliced Japanese breads is that they're too thick to fit in standard American toasters.
If I recall correctly, Japanese shokupan loaves were all the same size, but there were different slice options available. I think four, six, and eight were the common slice amounts. Also, when I was living there, most households relied on a toaster oven, as Japanese kitchens are too small for both a toaster oven and a toaster.

The bread is delicious, toasted or not, and if you make it at home, it’s your loaf and you can slice it any way you want!
__________________
Dance like no oneís watching, sing like no oneís listening, but cook like EVERYONE is eating!
https://justjoel59.wordpress.com
JustJoel is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2017, 10:44 PM   #5
Sous Chef
 
JustJoel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 803
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
Technically technically, it's not a starter nor a roux - it is a slurry. A roux is equal parts fat and flour, period. A slurry is a dry thickening agent (flour, cornstarch, arrowroot) thoroughly combined with a liquid (water, broth, juice) at a ratio of 1:4.

What's the difference between a roux and a slurry?

You are welcome to my allotment of sweetener for your coffee. I'll have mine plain and black, please.
Technically, you are quite correct, but all the tang zhong recipes I’ve come across so far, if they don’t use the Chinese word, refer to it as “water roux.” Go figure!
__________________
Dance like no oneís watching, sing like no oneís listening, but cook like EVERYONE is eating!
https://justjoel59.wordpress.com
JustJoel is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2018, 01:08 PM   #6
Sous Chef
 
JustJoel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 803
Other uses for tangjhon?

My shokupan came out so well that I’d like to use the starter, tangjhon, in other types of loaves. But an internet search for “breads that use tangjhon” only delivered recipes for shokupan or pan au lait? Can a tangjhonbe used in any other type of loaf?
__________________

__________________
Dance like no oneís watching, sing like no oneís listening, but cook like EVERYONE is eating!
https://justjoel59.wordpress.com
JustJoel is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.