"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches > Yeast Breads, Rolls & Braids
View Poll Results: How do you knead your breads
Mixer 1 20.00%
Food possessor 0 0%
By hand 4 80.00%
Voters: 5. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-10-2011, 09:57 AM   #11
Cook
 
pigskins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Webster, NY
Posts: 75
I'm late to the party, but thought I would jump in anyway. I've recently started getting into bread and roll making. We've had a bread machine for many years and it got a lot of use when we first bought it. It was great to add ingredients, set the timer, and wake up to a house filled with that wonderful aroma. As the kids got older and schedules got busier, the bread machine sat on a shelf. Now, I have been using it much more frequently to make/knead dough for bread, rolls, and pizza. I like it because I can "set it and forget it" to go do other things for an hour or so, then come back and take care of the rest.
__________________

__________________
pigskins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2011, 11:03 AM   #12
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,394
I've done it both ways by hand and my stand up mixer. I do not see the difference in the dough quality. It is easier to use machine.
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2011, 12:16 PM   #13
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
I'm one of the oddballs I guess. I barely knead my dough at all. I bring it together into a shag, and then knead it just enough to form a ball. I let it rise, punch it down with one or two knead motions, and then either allow it to rise again for bread or roll/stretch it out for pizza.

This produces a fine-crumb sandwich bread similar to Pepperidge Farms (but with that fresh baked flavor/aroma and crust!). I find that working this consistency dough out into a thin, almost translucent pizza also develops enough gluten to provide a stable and chewy crust.

I also find my method to be demonstrably faster than using our stand mixer for even double or triple batches (especially when you factor in clean-up). The first third of the flour is whisked into the liquids to form a thick, uniform "batter". The final 2/3 of the flour is then added and mixed/folded in with a dinner fork until all the flour is taken up. Then it just requires a dozen or so kneading motions to form a ball with the "shag". No opening/closing the mixer to scrape down the bowl, no washing parts other than a fork and mixing bowl, and done my way you get little or no dough on your hands.
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2011, 12:25 PM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,875
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher View Post
I'm one of the oddballs I guess. I barely knead my dough at all. I bring it together into a shag, and then knead it just enough to form a ball. I let it rise, punch it down with one or two knead motions, and then either allow it to rise again for bread or roll/stretch it out for pizza.

This produces a fine-crumb sandwich bread similar to Pepperidge Farms (but with that fresh baked flavor/aroma and crust!). I find that working this consistency dough out into a thin, almost translucent pizza also develops enough gluten to provide a stable and chewy crust.

I also find my method to be demonstrably faster than using our stand mixer for even double or triple batches (especially when you factor in clean-up). The first third of the flour is whisked into the liquids to form a thick, uniform "batter". The final 2/3 of the flour is then added and mixed/folded in with a dinner fork until all the flour is taken up. Then it just requires a dozen or so kneading motions to form a ball with the "shag". No opening/closing the mixer to scrape down the bowl, no washing parts other than a fork and mixing bowl, and done my way you get little or no dough on your hands.
I'm going to have to give your method a try. I'm not fond of kneading dough for 10 minutes at a time. My stand mixer is way too wimpy to do it. I have two food processors. One is on its last legs and the other doesn't have a big enough bowl. So your method sounds perfect.

I used to bake bread all my bread when I lived in a log cabin. I didn't much like kneading the dough for prolonged periods then, but I was younger and more energetic I would love to start baking bread again.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2011, 12:47 PM   #15
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
1-C Warm Water
1-T Yeast
1-T Honey
1/4-C Olive Oil

1-T Kosher Salt (Morton Coarse, Much less if using Diamond)
3-C All-Purpose Unbleached Flour

Bring the wet together as above. Add the first cup of flour and salt and whisk it to uniform consistency. Ditch the whisk, and bring in the last two cups with a fork, scraping the sides of the bowl, folding/cutting etc. Ditch the fork, and then bring all the shags and any remaining flour together by hand until you get a ball that is fairly uniform. I do this by kneading a little bit, and rubbing the whole ball around in the bowl to pick up anything stuck to the walls. This step takes about 30 seconds once you get good at it - maybe a minute or two if you've never done it (nowhere near the recommended 10 minutes).

Lightly rub another bowl with oil, and roll the ball in it. Wrap the bowl with a damp flour-sack towel. For rising, I warm my oven up a bit by setting it to 350F for a minute or two, then I shut it off (use your judgement here by sticking your hand in and feeling the warmth). Put the covered bowl in for an hour.

I punch it down and knead it a couple times, then the next step depends on what you're making. I always use my pizza peel though. If making bread, I put some cornmeal on the peel, put the ball on the corn meal, and cover with a damp towel. I let it rise while my pizza stone and oven heat up to 375F for another hour.

For pizza (this recipe makes two large thin-crusts), I just roll it out with a pin, and then finish stretching and forming the crust by picking it up by the edge and allowing the weight of the dough to stretch itself. This takes some practice. I don't start rolling the pizzas out until my oven and stone have fully pre-heated to 550F.

-----

Maybe I'll post some pics later, as it's a bread day for us and I'm baking a boule tonight.
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2011, 03:40 PM   #16
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,289
copied and pasted...I called it "Mosher Bread"
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2011, 07:12 PM   #17
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
PrincessFiona60 - Haha... I told my wife tonight her dinner (a BLT) features Mosher Bread. I got a look...

A quick photo of what the above recipe should yield when making a Boule.

__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2011, 07:14 PM   #18
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
A quick note - the bread should be left to rest until it's warm or cool, at least 30 minutes. Without the rest, the interior can stick to the blade due to the moisture and heat.

EDIT: I'll be making some pizza tomorrow, so I'll post a photo of that too.
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2011, 07:37 PM   #19
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher View Post
PrincessFiona60 - Haha... I told my wife tonight her dinner (a BLT) features Mosher Bread. I got a look...

A quick photo of what the above recipe should yield when making a Boule.
That looks wonderful! If I ever get my act together and get my recipes formatted, I have all my DC recipes credited to their creators. This will be an heirloom book for my Grandkids.
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 01:19 PM   #20
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Thanks! Despite being in my 20's (late 20's), I have begun archiving descriptions, photos, and recipes as well. My grandparents never wrote down their recipes, and it took me a long time to replicate just two that I enjoyed as a child (based on memory). I'd like to someday make a nice book and have a local printing company run a few dozen copies for my friends and family.

Pizza Pizza! (Utilizing the above recipe)...

__________________

__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.