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Old 12-29-2009, 04:49 PM   #1
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Problems with bread!

I have tried making bread several times and the last 2 times I have used the same recipe it was some sort of olive bread and it did not rise as much as it should. It was 2 totally different times and different yeast. Are there recipes that are harder or easier of what can I do?

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Old 12-29-2009, 06:12 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raidencmc View Post
I have tried making bread several times and the last 2 times I have used the same recipe it was some sort of olive bread and it did not rise as much as it should. It was 2 totally different times and different yeast. Are there recipes that are harder or easier of what can I do?
I'm no expert, but your yeast could be the problem. You might have killed the yeast with to hot use of water, the yeast might have expired. Sorry that is all I could come up with. We have some wonderful bakers here.Here's hoping they see and can help you out. You might give a list of ingredients for us to look at.
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Old 12-29-2009, 06:42 PM   #3
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Can you post your recipe and what you did and we will try to troubleshoot for you?
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Old 12-29-2009, 08:18 PM   #4
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Not knowing the recipe, and what you did, makes it a little hard to narrow down the problem.

It could be the yeast being too old, but with two different brands of yeast that seems less likely (you did check the expiration date on the packages didn't you). If the water was too hot you could have killed the yeast that way - another would depend on the recipe and how/when you added the salt, that can kill yeast, too.

Another "rise" problem is that ****able "X number of minutes or until double" instruction in most recipes. That throws a lot of new bread bakers for a loop when their dough doesn't double in size in X minutes. The temperature makes a big difference in how quickly the dough will double. Let the dough proof until it doubles in size even if that is an hour or more. My regular bread dough takes about an hour in a warm place.

Well, that's just a couple of thoughts.
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Old 12-29-2009, 10:01 PM   #5
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It could be anything along the line, so you will have to describe your process and your recipe before anyone can know what went wrong.

Sometimes you can have too much flour vs. water and then you will wind up with a brick. Also if your bread isnt rising the yeast might have been exposed to too much heat.
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Old 12-30-2009, 09:34 AM   #6
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I might be getting a head of myself but I understand that certain parts of recipe are flavor but certain parts are needed for the reaction. Is there anywhere that I can get more info on bread making in general?

Also if I would like to make rolls and not a loaf what would I do differently or is it more complicated then that.

Ingredients
  • 3 cups flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp fast action yeast
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 black or green olives, pitted and chopped
  • 3 sun dried tomatoes in oil, drained and chopped



Directions
  1. Place flour and salt in a bowl and sprinkle over the yeast and thyme. Make a well in the center and then pour in 7/8 cup warm water and 2 tbsp of olive oil.
  2. Mix to a dough and knead on a floured surface for 1- minutes, until elastic.
  3. Place dough in a large oiled plastic bag. Seal and leave in a warm place for about 2 hours, or until doubled.
  4. Turn out on a floured surface and knead lightly. Flatten the dough with your hands. Sprinkle over the olives and tomatoes and knead them in until they are well distributed. Shape the dough into a long oval and place on a lightly greased baking sheet. Cover and leave to rise in a warm place for 45 minutes.
  5. Preheat the oven to 375
  6. When risen, press your finger several times into the dough, drizzle the remaining oil and sprinkle with crushed rock salt.
  7. Bake for 35-40 minutes or intil loaf is golden and sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom.
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Old 12-30-2009, 09:59 AM   #7
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While cooking is an art, and, in general, baking is a science, the baking of bread falls somewhere in between with the addition of experience and a keen sense of touch. Learn to get a feel for the texture and response of worked dough. The flour/liquid ratio varies with humidity. Gauging the right surface texture is what is needed to make your bread(s) - only gained through experience.

There are hundreds and hundreds of bread recipes, but:

Breadworld

is a good place for you to start. I've been baking bread (seriously) for nearly 20 years. It can be a very rewarding endeavor and the part of cooking that I enjoy the most. For me, it began with receiving James Beard's "Beard On Bread" book as a gift, and I haven't stopped since.

Your recipe looks OK. I would do things differently, such as creating a poolish with the yeast to get it active before adding it to the flour, but that's just me. Be patient while waiting for the proving (also known as proofing). There's no such thing as waiting too long for it to rise. It will get there when it's ready. And wait to slice it until it's mostly cooled. Slicing too soon may ruin it! After slicing, look at the crumb (the interior texture - the size, distribution and softness of the holes) Remembering this will help you the next time you bake that recipe, and how you got there.

May you enjoy yourself and bring goodness to those around you.
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Old 12-30-2009, 10:40 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raidencmc View Post
I might be getting a head of myself but I understand that certain parts of recipe are flavor but certain parts are needed for the reaction. Is there anywhere that I can get more info on bread making in general?

Also if I would like to make rolls and not a loaf what would I do differently or is it more complicated then that.

Ingredients
  • 3 cups flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp fast action yeast
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 black or green olives, pitted and chopped
  • 3 sun dried tomatoes in oil, drained and chopped



Directions
  1. Place flour and salt in a bowl and sprinkle over the yeast and thyme. Make a well in the center and then pour in 7/8 cup warm water and 2 tbsp of olive oil.
  2. Mix to a dough and knead on a floured surface for 1- minutes, until elastic.
  3. Place dough in a large oiled plastic bag. Seal and leave in a warm place for about 2 hours, or until doubled.
  4. Turn out on a floured surface and knead lightly. Flatten the dough with your hands. Sprinkle over the olives and tomatoes and knead them in until they are well distributed. Shape the dough into a long oval and place on a lightly greased baking sheet. Cover and leave to rise in a warm place for 45 minutes.
  5. Preheat the oven to 375
  6. When risen, press your finger several times into the dough, drizzle the remaining oil and sprinkle with crushed rock salt.
  7. Bake for 35-40 minutes or intil loaf is golden and sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom.
Suggestions-
Use Kosher or non-iodized salt
Add yeast to water then 2 or 3 tbs of the flour.
When above mixture becomes bubbly add a cup of flour & stir well
Then add olive oil salt and thyme stirring well
Slowly incorporate enough of the remaining flour to create a dough that does not stick to mixing bowl.
Knead on floured surface for 10 minutes.
Return kneaded dough to lightly oiled mixing bowl.
Cover bowl with large dinner plate
Allow to rise in 75 - 80 F room till doubled (should be less than 2 hours)
Do your thing with tomatoes and olives.
You'd probably get a better rise if you used less olive oil.
Read up on surface tension and slashing bread to get a better oven spring.
Use a high gluten or bread flour.
Save your rock salt for deicing sidewalks
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Old 12-30-2009, 11:04 AM   #9
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In making an Olive Focaccia, the use of rock salt, although not necessarily healthy, is classic. Also, you don't slash Focaccia. You're looking for texture, not rise. 2-3" is just fine for this kind of bread, with a very airy crumb (texture with large holes.) 3 tbls. of olive oil is right. Focaccia is closer to pizza dough than regular bread.
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Old 12-30-2009, 11:14 AM   #10
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You're 100% correct. However-
It wasn't clear the OP was making Italian Bialys. The OP was complaining about the lack of rise.
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