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Old 06-07-2015, 10:27 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
Put it in the oven with the interior light on. The oven keeps out draughts and the light will provide just enough heat to let the dough proof.
That's what I do. Even before I start to put the ingredients together, I put the oven light on. By the time I have everything mixed together, the dough is ready for rising and the oven is just the right temp for rising. Leave the light on. You can look at it and know when it is ready for the next step.
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Old 06-12-2015, 06:04 AM   #12
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thank you all for your responses and great ideas on how to prove bread.

But i assume no one here has tried my proposed method using a sous vide/ban marie.

So what is the perfect temperature to proof bread then for a quick rise?
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Old 06-12-2015, 08:13 AM   #13
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It never ceases to amaze me, the things you find on the internet!

Bread Proofer

I would shoot for a temperature range of about 72F degrees up to a normal body temperature of 98.6F,

You could also make a loaf of bread that requires no proofing. This recipe will give you a fresh loaf in about an hour.

Cuban Bread
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Old 06-12-2015, 08:26 AM   #14
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When it is cold my mother puts dough in microwave and every so often turns it on for couple of seconds.


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Old 06-12-2015, 09:04 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicouk View Post
thank you all for your responses and great ideas on how to prove bread.

But i assume no one here has tried my proposed method using a sous vide/ban marie.

So what is the perfect temperature to proof bread then for a quick rise?
I am just curious. Why is it so important for you to have a quick rise of your dough? the longer it takes to rise, the more structure and flavor your bread will have.
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Old 09-23-2016, 03:39 PM   #16
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The microwave trick is great!

I will turn on the light in my oven and just put it in there. Makes it just warm enough!
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Old 09-23-2016, 04:51 PM   #17
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I bake bread often, and just put a study lamp (regular low wattage) over the bread dough....just enough to give some warmth.....have the bowl covered with saran wrap...... the lamp gives a little heat but not too much.........and this was in Kazakhstan where it would get minus 40 degrees in the winter.........so that was cooooooooooold........it worked just fine.......I never had to put it in the oven, etc., but that definitely would work great, too.........
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Old 09-23-2016, 09:10 PM   #18
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Give it a try next time you are in a rush :)
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Old 09-24-2016, 04:16 AM   #19
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I turn the oven on "warm" for about one minute. Then shut it off and turn on the oven light. Just enough warmth to encourage all the proofing it needs.

I also do not use plastic wrap over the top of the bowl. I prefer wax paper to prevent a crust from forming. The plastic wrap prevents the dough from continuing rising once it reaches the top of the bowl. The wax paper placed on the dough with the sides loose, allow the dough to rise as high as it is going to without any hindrance.
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Old 09-24-2016, 07:44 AM   #20
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I have several ways of proofing,

I cover the dough with either plastic wrap or wax paper. Both are greased and laid directly on the dough. Then I cover the bowl with a tea towel.

Depending on the season and temp in the house/kitchen (I don't have central heat so it really fluctuates):-

Overnight in the fridge, on top of the fridge, in the oven with the light on, on top of the stove with the oven going (for other things), on the counter in sunlight.

It also depends on the actual recipe itself.. I try to stick to them as I'm not good at innovating new steps (unless I screw up somewhere) If they say it should take about an hour for the rise, then I put it where I think it will accomplish that.

I'm not sure I understand why people are putting water dishes under or around their rising dough. Why? I do leave a pan in the oven while actually baking and I sometimes even spritz water in during baking, but not while proofing.
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