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Old 09-24-2016, 03:21 PM   #31
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thanks a bunch GG and RGP for all your help.........autolyse and poolish to y'all..........will have to look up autolyse and I just love poolish......
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Old 09-24-2016, 03:53 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Ciabatta is quite a project, but can be fun. The first time I made it, I didn't notice that I needed to turn and fold it every half hour, then let it rest for a half hour, repeat, repeat, and I had errands to do. So, yes, I took it with me and did that in the car. It was a warm, sunny day - perfect for rising between folds

Pro tip: I make myself a checklist to keep track of which fold and which rise I had completed, so I would know when it was time to preheat the oven and when it was time to bake.

Light Summer Ciabatta Recipe | King Arthur Flour
Julia Child had a trick of poking her fingers into the dough. One finger for the finished first rising. Two fingers for the second. Three fingers for the third, etc.
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Old 09-24-2016, 04:35 PM   #33
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I made this for the first time a couple of weeks ago, and it turned out pretty good. In the future I'll leave it in the fridge for a few days after the 18 hour rise to allow more flavor to develop, like I do with other no knead breads I make.

This is the only ciabatta that I have made, so I can't compare it to other recipes and methods.

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Old 09-25-2016, 01:45 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
I made this for the first time a couple of weeks ago, and it turned out pretty good. In the future I'll leave it in the fridge for a few days after the 18 hour rise to allow more flavor to develop, like I do with other no knead breads I make.

This is the only ciabatta that I have made, so I can't compare it to other recipes and methods.

18 hour rise? Good grief. How much yeast do you use? Mine uses 1½ tsps and gets a great rise.

Total with the autolyse, 3 rests and a rise still only takes about 2½ hours. The 8 minutes of kneading is done in the KA mixer. All I have to remember ahead is the poolish (only takes about 5 minutes to mix up), and that can still be done just a couple of hours before mixing in the rest of the ingredients if I space out doing it the night before. I'm not organized enough to plan as far ahead as you would have to do for yours.
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Old 09-25-2016, 07:06 AM   #35
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18 hour rise? Good grief. How much yeast do you use? Mine uses 1½ tsps and gets a great rise.

Total with the autolyse, 3 rests and a rise still only takes about 2½ hours. The 8 minutes of kneading is done in the KA mixer. All I have to remember ahead is the poolish (only takes about 5 minutes to mix up), and that can still be done just a couple of hours before mixing in the rest of the ingredients if I space out doing it the night before. I'm not organized enough to plan as far ahead as you would have to do for yours.
1/4 teaspoon yeast, which is standard no knead bread amount. No, I really don't need to plan. After the 18 hour rise, the dough can go in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. All that is required is to let it warm up a bit, fold once, and wait 2 hours before it goes in the oven. I commonly have dough in the fridge, ready for when I want bread.
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Old 09-25-2016, 10:08 AM   #36
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I guess that I don't really mind the kneading. I'll do it by hand or by machine, depending on my mood.

I can't work ahead like that since we don't actually eat a lot of bread here. I make it for specific meals or occasions, but not daily or even weekly. I bake bread 5 or 6 times a year, mostly during the cold months. If I made up a batch of dough today, it might not be used for a couple of months, and that seems like a bit stretch.
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Old 09-25-2016, 12:00 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
This is the recipe that I use from Artisan Bread Baking.com: Ciabatta

If any of his techniques are unfamiliar to you, Barry also includes a "how to" section as well.
Not sure if I should thank you or curse you for the link! I have been looking for good solid bread recipes this is it. But now I will spend a lot of time going thru these!
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Old 09-26-2016, 12:51 PM   #38
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Hey All,

I find it quite difficult to proof my bread in the UK because of its cold weather.

I was wondering if it would be possible to proof bread in a covered glass bowl and set it over a sous vide bain marie or even let it float in the warm water, therefore I can have more control over the temperature.

Has anyone tried this before?
Why would you want to. I live in the north of England and have an unheated kitchen (except when the oven is in use) and have no trouble getting my dough to rise. it just takes longer - but that improves the flavour! The cooler the atmosphere, the longer my dough takes to rise but I don't stand and watch it. In the winter I generally mix the dough in the evening and leave it in a covered bowl or Lock and Lock box overnight and knock it back and bake it in the morning. Most experienced bakers will tell you that a long slow rise gives a better bread than a quick one.

Elizabeth David does give an old method of "proving" (in the UK - "proofing" is American) dough in a large bath of water but IIRC this was to slow down the rise in warm weather. I'm not at home so can't look it up but it's in her bread book. Ignore anything on the subject by that arrogant idiot who appears/appeared on television with Mary Berry!!

(EDIT: - OK, so I'm an arrogant idiot too but I've been baking bread since he was a glint in his Daddy's eye and a blush on his Mummy's cheek and much of what he has to say is downright WRONG!)
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