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Old 03-08-2011, 05:27 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Was that white line at the bottom of your sliced roll whole wheat flour? It seems a shame you're not interested in using Durum flour.
I'm not sure why there was a white line at the bottom of the sliced roll. I don't understand what you mean when you ask if it was whole wheat flour. The rolls were made with 100% whole grain wheat flour. Maybe the line is there because I stuck the bread back in the oven 'cause it wasn't done in the middle on the first try?

It's not that I don't have any interest in using Durum flour. I just haven't found it. What I usually buy for bread is the second one* on this page (it's in English): Meunerie Milanaise - Farines biologiques moulues sur pierre. I see that that company has whole durum flour, but I haven't seen it. Is it worth asking for?

*elsewhere on that site, they say that "integral" means they get 100 grams of flour out of 100 grams of grain.
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Old 03-08-2011, 05:38 PM   #12
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While King Arthur (KA) is quite pricey you might want to read their description of their durum as opposed to their semolina flour. Their durum even smells good.
You might also find the following to be of interest-
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winter_wheat
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Old 03-08-2011, 06:12 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
While King Arthur (KA) is quite pricey you might want to read their description of their durum as opposed to their semolina flour. Their durum even smells good.
You might also find the following to be of interest-
Winter wheat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
King Arthur is a U.S. company. I don't want to bother trying to order from them and have to deal with customs. Is their durum flour whole grain? If it is, I will look for it if we drive down to Vermont.

I like whole grains and don't much like bread without the bran. There is usually a way to make it work with whole grain. I make whole grain sponge cake. I just use soft whole grain wheat flour.
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Old 03-09-2011, 04:06 AM   #14
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From-
The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan | Details

The second species of wheat (Triticum durum) grown in Saskatchewan is represented by one market type, the Canada Western Amber Durum (CWAD) class. Durum wheat production in Saskatchewan was initiated in the 1920s and has grown to be the second most widely produced wheat in Canada. The area seeded to CWAD wheat in Saskatchewan averaged 1,879,892 ha between 1998 and 2002. Saskatchewan accounts for roughly 83% of Canadian durum wheat production, which is concentrated in the traditionally lower-rainfall portions of the province, the brown and dark brown soil zones. Durum wheat typically has a protein level similar to that of CWRS wheat; it is used in the manufacture of pasta, bulgur, couscous, and bread. Within the last five years a subtype of CWAD durum has been introduced: the Extra Strong CWAD subclass addresses a preference for very strong gluten durum types in the Italian market. It is anticipated that up to 15% of CWAD production in Saskatchewan could shift to this ES type once more varieties are in place.

Over the last twenty years, common wheat production in Saskatchewan has declined by 37% while the durum wheat area has increased by 13%. This change in production reflects higher returns for durum and continuing low prices for bread wheat, as a result of hefty subsidies for wheat production and export enhancement in the EU and the USA, relative to Canada.

Pierre Hucl

KAF durum is not whole grain. To our taste, breads containing whole grain seem to be more palatable when made with a dough that contains no more than 50% whole grain flour. We prefer bread made from hard wheat to that made from cake-like soft wheat. A notable problem with many whole grain flours is their higher propensity for rancidification.
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Old 03-11-2011, 10:39 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
From-
The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan | Details

...

KAF durum is not whole grain. To our taste, breads containing whole grain seem to be more palatable when made with a dough that contains no more than 50% whole grain flour. We prefer bread made from hard wheat to that made from cake-like soft wheat. A notable problem with many whole grain flours is their higher propensity for rancidification.
Interesting info.

I use soft flour when making sponge cake, not bread. Whole grain flour doesn't get a chance to go rancid at my house Well, I bought soft flour and put it in the freezer. The soft flour doesn't get used nearly as often as the hard one. I don't bother to buy all purpose. I got used to having two kinds when I couldn't get all purpose whole grain flour.

I've eaten whole grain bread my entire life. I'll bet you would enjoy the 100% whole rye (rugbrød) they make in Denmark, even though you might not want to eat it every day.
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Old 03-15-2011, 02:18 PM   #16
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Baked a whole wheat, durum, bread flour blend 550 gram free form loaf with a black sesame seed topping early this morning(0500) at 425F for 1 hour. By 0900 we only had a 65 gram heel left uneaten. The bulk of 1+#'s was consumed with sweet butter and a few slices schmeared with goose liverwurst. Shoulda took few pics before we only had the heel left.
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Old 03-15-2011, 06:52 PM   #17
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Bill, that looks really yummy (but a bit pale for my taste ).

How would you compare the taste of black sesame seeds to the pale ones? I have never tried the black ones.
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Old 03-15-2011, 06:56 PM   #18
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Black ones seem nuttier and less prone to going rancid.
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