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Old 06-20-2007, 10:36 PM   #1
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What did I do wrong with my bread?

I'm new here! -waves-

Tonight I attempted my first loaf of bread. I went out and bought some yeast and king aurther whole wheat flour and decided on a recipe someone on this board posted from meanmeals.com.

Well the bread came out looking great, and a sliced off an end peice for a taste and it tasted great too! Only problem is that when I sliced through the rest of the loaf I found it was a bit under cooked in the middle, towards the bottom. I think it's fine to eat,just a bit doughy in that one spot on all the middle peices. I put tried putting it back in the oven for 10 minutes, and then another 15 minutes with a cover thinking that might help. Only made the outside crust slightly crispier. I did make a few changes to the original recipe... I used vanilla yogurt instead of plain, and made one big loaf (about the size of the storebought pepperidge farm loafs) rather than 2 smaller ones, and I sifted the flour.. not sure if I was supposed to do that or not. Perhaps those things had something to do with it. I'm betting on the bigger loaf size.

Overall I am thrilled with the bread, considering it's my very first try - but what can I do next time to prevent the under cooking? Longer cooking times or maybe a higher temperature? I look forward to your suggestions. Thanks in advance!

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Old 06-20-2007, 10:43 PM   #2
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try baking it for 50 minutes at 325
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Old 06-20-2007, 10:48 PM   #3
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if you sliced a slice off immediately after taking it out of the oven the inside will be all gummy, so to avoid that you have to let it cool completely before slicing. as peter reinhart says, the last step to baking bread isn't baking, it's cooling! if you want warm bread it's better to wait until it cools completely then reheat it.
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Old 06-20-2007, 10:49 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baking fool
if you sliced a slice off immediately after taking it out of the oven the inside will be all gummy because the starches haven't set. so to avoid that you have to let it cool completely before slicing. as peter reinhart says, the last step to baking bread isn't baking, it's cooling! if you want warm bread it's better to wait until it cools completely then reheat it.
good point
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Old 06-20-2007, 10:54 PM   #5
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I have to second these comments. I know how tempting it is to want to slice off a piece of the yeasty bread and slather it with butter, but you need to wait. It's a little like letting a roast "rest" until you cut it. Your patience will be rewarded.
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Old 06-21-2007, 12:14 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E
I have to second these comments. I know how tempting it is to want to slice off a piece of the yeasty bread and slather it with butter, but you need to wait. Your patience will be rewarded.
that's right. good bread is all about patience.
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Old 06-21-2007, 03:43 PM   #7
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What I have learned in my scratch bread making is that I preset my oven to 355, and then upon opening the oven, I kick it down to 340 for 40 minutes.

Once you open the oven you are automatically dropping the temperature anyhow, so bringing it up higher than needed, you can open your oven and keep the desired temperature you need to bake perfect bread.
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Old 06-21-2007, 05:43 PM   #8
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Sour Rye

CREATING & MAINTAINING A RYE SOUR
To start a rye sour-
Day One
By noon combine cup rye flour,1/8 TSP dry yeast, 1 cup warm water, 1 TSP minced onion, and (optionally)
1 TSP crushed caraway seeds and ferment covered at 70F 80F (75F = 24C ) for up to 24 hours.
Day Two
Between 07:15 and noon the following day add 1 cup rye flour and 1 cup water. Ferment covered overnight.
Day Three
Mix thoroughly, remove a cup for the bread to be baked that day, add cup each water and rye flour to the
remaining sour and refrigerate in a sealed 1 quart glass mayonnaise jar.
MAKING ONE 1 POUND LOAF-
See above for rye sour which is originally made from rye flour, water, yeast
and chopped onion and may be kept for months in the refrigerator.
Ingredients: 1 cup rye sour, cup warm water, 2 cups high gluten flour, cup first clear flour, 1 TSP yeast, TSP diastatic malt, 1 TSP salt
Night before- remove 1 cup rye sour from refrigerator and supplement refrigerator supply with cup water and cup rye flour.
07:15- mix cup warm water with yeast and diastatic malt
07:30- blend first clear flour, 1 cup high gluten flour and rye sour into above mixture
07:40- blend in salt and then enough additional high gluten flour to form plastic dough
07:50- turn out onto floured surface and knead for 15 minutes.
08:00- place ball of dough in oiled bowl and coat surface of dough with oil from bowl
cover bowl with towel and allow to double
09:10- turn out and knead for 10 15 minutes
09:25- begin second rising in covered bowl and prepare baking sheet by sprinkling with coarse corn meal
10:25- turn out, knead lightly to remove large bubbles. Roll and shape into loaf
10:30- set on baking sheet and cover. Prepare corn starch and water solution
turn on oven set to 400F = 204C with pan of water on top shelf rear
11:00- paint loaf with warm, but not hot, corn starch solution and cut 3 diagonal 5/8" (16mm) deep slashes
11:10- place loaf in oven
11:13- spray loaf with water mist
11:16- spray loaf with water mist
11:20- rotate baking sheet 180 degrees and spray with water mist
11:25- spray loaf with water mist
11:30- turn oven down to 375F = 191C
11:40- move loaf off sheet and onto stone
11:45- remove pan of water
11:50- turn off oven
12:00- remove loaf to cooling rack
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Old 06-21-2007, 06:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill
CREATING & MAINTAINING A RYE SOUR
To start a rye sour-
Day One
By noon combine cup rye flour,1/8 TSP dry yeast, 1 cup warm water, 1 TSP minced onion, and (optionally)
1 TSP crushed caraway seeds and ferment covered at 70F 80F (75F = 24C ) for up to 24 hours.
Day Two
Between 07:15 and noon the following day add 1 cup rye flour and 1 cup water. Ferment covered overnight.
Day Three
Mix thoroughly, remove a cup for the bread to be baked that day, add cup each water and rye flour to the
remaining sour and refrigerate in a sealed 1 quart glass mayonnaise jar.
MAKING ONE 1 POUND LOAF-
See above for rye sour which is originally made from rye flour, water, yeast
and chopped onion and may be kept for months in the refrigerator.
Ingredients: 1 cup rye sour, cup warm water, 2 cups high gluten flour, cup first clear flour, 1 TSP yeast, TSP diastatic malt, 1 TSP salt
Night before- remove 1 cup rye sour from refrigerator and supplement refrigerator supply with cup water and cup rye flour.
07:15- mix cup warm water with yeast and diastatic malt
07:30- blend first clear flour, 1 cup high gluten flour and rye sour into above mixture
07:40- blend in salt and then enough additional high gluten flour to form plastic dough
07:50- turn out onto floured surface and knead for 15 minutes.
08:00- place ball of dough in oiled bowl and coat surface of dough with oil from bowl
cover bowl with towel and allow to double
09:10- turn out and knead for 10 15 minutes
09:25- begin second rising in covered bowl and prepare baking sheet by sprinkling with coarse corn meal
10:25- turn out, knead lightly to remove large bubbles. Roll and shape into loaf
10:30- set on baking sheet and cover. Prepare corn starch and water solution
turn on oven set to 400F = 204C with pan of water on top shelf rear
11:00- paint loaf with warm, but not hot, corn starch solution and cut 3 diagonal 5/8" (16mm) deep slashes
11:10- place loaf in oven
11:13- spray loaf with water mist
11:16- spray loaf with water mist
11:20- rotate baking sheet 180 degrees and spray with water mist
11:25- spray loaf with water mist
11:30- turn oven down to 375F = 191C
11:40- move loaf off sheet and onto stone
11:45- remove pan of water
11:50- turn off oven
12:00- remove loaf to cooling rack
i think you replied to the wrong thread. this is about a loaf that was gummy & sticky inside.
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Old 06-22-2007, 05:35 AM   #10
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I use a digital thermometer to check before I take it out--it should read 190 degrees in the center.
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