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Old 12-12-2007, 02:39 PM   #1
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What would cause doughy bread?

I made some bread today for the first time, but it was doughy and moist after i had cooked it. Would this be from to much liquid?

Ingrediants used
  • 700g Bread Flour
  • 1 Tsp Salt
  • 1 Tsp Quick Yeist
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 200ml luck warm water
  • 200ml luck warm milk
Method
  • Mix all ingrediants together in big bowl, free hand.
  • Place in oiled pot with tea towel over and let rise for 5 hours (i fell asleep )
  • Remove and kneed for 3 min (i added to much flour so it split a bit)
  • Place in pot and let rise for 3 hours (feel asleep again )
  • Over at 180 degrees C, cooked for 45 minutes but bowl of water underneath

    This is when i took it out and it wasnt cooked properly so i put it back in.
  • 15 minutes 160 degrees C (checked it, still wasnt cooked)
  • 15 minutes 200 degrees C
It is still edable and goes well with butter/jam ect.. but it isnt as tasty on its own. Which i think is down to it being doughy, next time i will use my sugar as it was very bland. And i wan't it sweet.



Any one got any idea's of what it could be?

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Old 12-12-2007, 02:41 PM   #2
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Undercooked, underbaked.
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Old 12-12-2007, 02:49 PM   #3
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I think your oven wasn't hot enough. The no knead bread recipes I use call for a 450 degree oven.

Your bread will be less bland if you add some more salt.
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Old 12-12-2007, 03:44 PM   #4
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I agree with the others:

oven not hot enough

not enough time in the oven

This is a large recipe, having about 40% more flour and liquid than the no knead recipe I have. Seem like too much liquid is not problem, as my calculation show about 54% hydration which is low if anything. And then there was your comment about "too much flour", which might make it even lower.

Low moisture content may produce a dense, chewy bread. Combine that with low temp and short cooking time and you get moist, dense, chewy bread.
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Old 12-12-2007, 03:50 PM   #5
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Now that my mind is working better, I agree with Mozart that it needed a lot more time in the oven -- that's a LOT of dough to bake.

Usually a recipe with that much flour will make 2 loaves of bread, meant to be baked off separately.
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Old 12-12-2007, 04:08 PM   #6
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The actual size wasnt big, probably 3-4" diameter, 1-2" heigh. Well i dont think that is big, i am probably wrong though.

Ok so i used to little water and i didnt cook it for long enough/heat to high.

So would you recommend adding more milk/water and either turning heat up or putting in for longer?

As well as seperating it into 2 buns?
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Old 12-12-2007, 04:20 PM   #7
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Id do all those things, but probablywould try to find a better recipe, actually.

Can you easily cinvert an American recipe to weight/metric?

If so, this one is a very good one.
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Old 12-12-2007, 04:31 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJWild View Post
The actual size wasn't big, probably 3-4" diameter, 1-2" high. Well i don't think that is big, i am probably wrong though.

OK so i used to little water and i didn't cook it for long enough/heat to high.

So would you recommend adding more milk/water and either turning heat up or putting in for longer?

As well as separating it into 2 buns?
OK, that doesn't seem possible with that much flour (3-4" dia. and 1 to 2" high)

Your original post on method was a little hard to follow. After the second rise, did you put it in something to bake it?

I agree about a different recipe. Bread recipes seem pretty exacting to me, and if they don't work well for you, just move on to a better one.
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Old 12-12-2007, 08:03 PM   #9
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I tried again but on a higher heat, it was a bit better, the outside layer is crusting really really hard and i perfer soft bread, after i had let it risen and i tried to punch it, it was really sticky so i couldn't. I split it into two and put them in 2 glass bowls, tried 75% bread flour & 25% regular flour, it tasted alot nicer plain then the first one did. I added a bit more sugar aswell. Everything else as the same.

Ye i kept it in the pot i used to let it rise in.

I'll try jennyema recipe tomorrow morning, prepare and let it rise before i go to college.



Also, is their a way to make it so it doesnt go crusty? as i do not like crusty bread.

Cheers
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Old 12-12-2007, 08:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJWild View Post
I tried again but on a higher heat, it was a bit better, the outside layer is crusting really really hard and i prefer soft bread, after i had let it risen and i tried to punch it, it was really sticky so i couldn't. I split it into two and put them in 2 glass bowls, tried 75% bread flour & 25% regular flour, it tasted alot nicer plain then the first one did. I added a bit more sugar aswell. Everything else as the same.

Ye i kept it in the pot i used to let it rise in.

I'll try jennyema recipe tomorrow morning, prepare and let it rise before i go to college.



Also, is their a way to make it so it doesn't go crusty? as i do not like crusty bread.

Cheers
No. You can't make it un-crusty. The whole point of the cooking technique (in a cast iron pot, at high heat) is to make it crusty!
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