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Old 04-08-2009, 11:06 AM   #21
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Yeast is a living organism, and since it is, there is no set time for how long it will take a yeast bread to rise. The temperature and humidity of your kitchen will both have quite a bit to do with that. Just because a recipe gives a time limit, doesn't mean you should pay too much attention. The dough will tell you when it is "double in bulk!"

Another important variable in bread recipes is the amount of flour specified. This always varies, based upon the moisture in the flour as well as in the air. You have to go by feel. This is another reason why the more you make bread the better you will get at it. Once you know what the dough should feel like and look like, it's a breeze.
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Old 04-08-2009, 03:05 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
Yeast is a living organism, and since it is, there is no set time for how long it will take a yeast bread to rise. The temperature and humidity of your kitchen will both have quite a bit to do with that. Just because a recipe gives a time limit, doesn't mean you should pay too much attention. The dough will tell you when it is "double in bulk!"

Another important variable in bread recipes is the amount of flour specified. This always varies, based upon the moisture in the flour as well as in the air. You have to go by feel. This is another reason why the more you make bread the better you will get at it. Once you know what the dough should feel like and look like, it's a breeze.
Points well taken. I usually proof my dough in my microwave oven, after boiling a cup of water and putting it in the corner. My kitchen is cool (65 F) so this helps shorten the time. Still, coarse grains will still take more time, even with help.

FG
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